Skip to main content
LATEST INFORMATION ABOUT COVID-19

READ MORE

The Cannabis Use Disorders Identification Test (CUDIT) helps a person identify if their cannabis use is problematic.  Answer the questions below and add up your points.

Have you used any cannabis over the past six months?      YES / NO

If YES, please answer the following questions about your cannabis use. Add up the points to the responses that are most correct for you in relation to your cannabis use over the past six months

Points 1. How often do you use cannabis?
0
1
2
3
4
Never
Monthly or less
2-4 times a month
2-3 times a week
4 or more times a week
 
2.  How many hours were you “stoned” on a typical day when you had been using cannabis?
0
1
2
3
4
Less than 1
1 or 2
3 or 4
5 or 6
7 or more
  3.  How often during the past 6 months did you find that you were not able to stop using cannabis once you had started?
0
1
2
3
4
Never
Less than monthly
Monthly
Weekly
Daily or almost daily
  4. How often during the past 6 months did you fail to do what was normally expected from you because of using cannabis?
0
1
2
3
4
Never
Less than monthly
Monthly
Weekly
Daily or almost daily
  5. How often in the past 6 months have you devoted a great deal of your time to getting, using, or recovering from cannabis?
0
1
2
3
4
Never
Less than monthly
Monthly
Weekly
Daily or almost daily
  6. How often in the past 6 months have you had a problem with your memory or concentration after using cannabis?
0
1
2
3
4
Never
Less than monthly
Monthly
Weekly
Daily or almost daily
  7. How often do you use cannabis in situations that could be physically hazardous, such as driving, operating machinery, or caring for children?
0
1
2
3
4
Never
Less than monthly
Monthly
Weekly
Daily or almost daily
  8. Have you ever thought about cutting down, or stopping, your use of cannabis?
0
2
4
Never
Yes, but not in the past 6 months
Yes, during the past 6 months

Scoring
Scores of 8 or more indicate hazardous cannabis use.
Scores of 12 or more indicate a possible cannabis use disorder, for which further intervention may be required.

Alcohol

  1. Abstaining from alcohol, or following low-risk guidelines if you do drink has many benefits. that include more energy, better concentration, achieving and maintaining a healthy weight, a reduced risk of many illnesses, and it is much better for the environment.
  2. A healthy diet consists mainly of plant foods such as fruit, vegetables, legumes (e.g. beans, lentils, chickpeas), whole grains, nuts and seeds.
  3. Foods are more nutritious when they are closer to their natural state (e.g. whole grains as compared to refined grains); so include many unprocessed (or slightly processed) foods in your diet and avoid highly processed foods.
  4. There are practical  guidelines to help people make healthy food choices, including Canada’s Food Guide, My Plate, the Vegetarian Food Pyramid and the Healthy Eating Plate.
  5. Tasty, healthy meals and snacks can be prepared in little time and at low cost

 

Healthy eating is one of the most important things you can do to enhance and maintain optimal health.     

This section summarizes the most important information you need to know about healthy eating.  Consult the "For Those Who Want to Know More" section below for additional information.  

 

 

Back to top Back to top

© Concordia University