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Public Scholars Program

Qualifying training

GET STARTED

STEP 1

Get familiar with the program

STEP 2

Complete the qualifying training

STEP 3

Apply to the program (by invitation)


Book a meeting with us

Strategic Public Communications Training

The Strategic Public Communications Training is an eight-week seminar (not for credit) that teaches PhD students research dissemination, content creation, and strategic social media management. The seminar comprises six two-hour workshops plus asynchronous activities, and runs from January to March. Throughout the training, you will be asked to apply your learning by producing regular social media content, a research pitch video, or a LinkedIn article.

certificate_of_completion

Upon completion of the program requirements, you will receive a certificate of completion, and a notation on your GradProSkills record.


Training schedule

The training programs run every Winter term between January and March.

Weeks 1 and 2
Program introduction and knowledge democratization
Acquire necessary skills and tools to innovate and democratize research knowledge outside the academic context.
Week 3
Preparing a successful research pitch
Develop a compelling and brief engaging presentation of your PhD research that can be presented in any context to a diverse, non-specialist audience.
Week 4
Writing for the public
Outline the key elements, ideas and strategies that contribute to writing an accessible blog or essay for a broad audience.
Weeks 5 and 6
Social media training
Explore the professional side of social media and start positioning yourself as an influencer in your field by creating captivating content and managing online presence.
Week 7
Online networking using LinkedIn
Leverage the LinkedIn platform to maximize your reach and network allowing you to communicate your message strategically to an extended audience.
Week 8
The Power (and perils) of Twitter
Explore Twitter’s opportunities and etiquette leveraging the platform's connection potential to build a relevant network and draw attention to your research.

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