ALLISON MOORE

MUKOJIMA DIORAMA

November 7 - December 16, 2022

A group of 3 Japanese buildings in miniature

Exhibition description

MUKOJIMA DIORAMA is a video mapping installation that presents a portrait of the Sumida-Ku ward in Tokyo, Japan. The intimate installation uses observational filming, archival photographs, and spatialized sound composition to portray the historical resonance of architecture in this unique neighborhood and reveal how cities transform and change over time. The project uses video-mapping onto laser-cut building models to create the illusion of ghostly buildings in a miniature theatre set. Within the windows and doors, daily life comes alive in the projected imagery. More than a historical document, the installation portrays the house as it represents a psychological state of being. The building’s story is told through the personal lives of the buildings’ inhabitants, just as the inhabitants' private life is represented through the façade of a disappearing building. MUKOJIMA DIORAMA  was created during residency at Tokyo Arts and Space in 2018.

About the artist

Based in Montreal, Allison Moore is a new media artist working in expanded cinema. Her work has been presented at Tokyo Arts and Space (Japan), OBORO (Montreal), Traverse Video (France), Museu de Arte de Belem (Brazil), Festival of Nouveau Cinéma (Montréal), FIFA Experimental (Montréal), MAPP Festival, MUTEK Montreal and ISEA 2020. Her recent projects are inspired by themes of narrative storytelling in digital arts, video-mapping landscapes and architecture, VR, site-specific public art, and performance. Moore's works reinterpret and rebuild the world as a metaphoric landscape in which sensitive beings are in synergy with their allegorical macrocosm. Moore works as a freelance editor, compositor, animator, and workshop facilitator in New Media practices.

Websitehttp://www.allisonmoore.net

IG: @allisonmoo

Acknowledgements

The artist acknowledges the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec, Tokyo Arts and Space (TOKAS), and 39art Mukojima.

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