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Austin Henderson

Henderson_Austin

Thesis Title 

Over the Rainbow, Beyond the Screen: Queer Legacies of The Wizard of Oz (1939) in Contemporary Art and Visual Culture

Program

MA - Art History

Supervisor

Dr. John Potvin

Research Interests

  • Film History
  • Popular Culture
  • Visual and Material Culture
  • Fashion and Costume Design History
  • Queer Theory
  • Histories of LGBTQ+ Activism

Biography 

    Austin Henderson is currently completing his MA in Art History at Concordia University. Austin’s thesis investigates the influence of the film "The Wizard of Oz" (Fleming, 1939) in works of contemporary art and visual culture. Fundamentally, his thesis aims to bridge the scholarly gaps between the histories of art and film. Through using queer theory as its core methodological framework, Austin's thesis is attentive to the film’s ongoing reverence within broader histories of queer (LGBTQ+) culture and activism. To conduct archival research for his project, he has been received at The Margaret Herrick Library (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences) in Beverly Hills, California.

    Austin has presented his research for Context and Meaning at Queen’s University in Kingston (2020) and the Society for the Study of Architecture in Canada Conference in Halifax (2019). His writing has recently been contributed to esse arts + opinions and The Concordian. Austin is a core member of the Ethnocultural Art Histories Research Group (EAHR) at Concordia, and served as the Vice President of the Art History Graduate Student Association (AHGSA) from 2019-2020. His research has been supported by the Faculty of Fine Arts Fellowship and the Fine Arts Travel Award.

    Austin holds a BFA in Visual Art from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. He has studied internationally at UNSW Art & Design in Sydney, Australia and The New York Academy of Art in New York City. His artwork has been shown in group exhibitions throughout Canada and the United States.

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