Concordia University

https://www.concordia.ca/content/shared/en/news/main/items/2018/09/04/Ask-Our-Experts11.html

Traffic and Urban Mobility

Ask our Experts
Posted on September 4, 2018

As Montrealers head back to school and back to work, next week’s commute will very likely be a headache-inducing mess. Traffic jams, countless detours, exhaust fumes, short tempers—it isn’t something anyone looks forward to. But, again this year, the problems are exacerbated by sprawling roadway construction everywhere we look.

Does it always have to be this bad? What can policy-makers and urban planners do to make the annual ritual of the post-Labour Day commute a little less unpleasant?

Concordia University has several researchers who have expertise in traffic management, mobility alternatives and urban sprawl. They will be available for interviews as of Tuesday, September 4.
 

Building better infrastructure

Few cities and provinces spring to mind faster than Montreal and Quebec when it comes to problematic road construction and maintenance. Associate professor Luis Amador Jimenez in the Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering department in the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science can discuss road and highway design and management, urban mobility and transportation analysis.

luis.amador@concordia.ca
(514) 848-2424 ext. 5783

 

Urban transport alternatives

Anjali Awasthi, an associate professor at the Concordia Institute for Information Systems Engineering, can speak on topics relating to sustainable urban traffic models, intelligent transport systems and how cities can implement them.

Anjali.awasthi@concordia.ca
(514) 848-2424 ext. 5622

 

Urban sprawl

What does the ongoing expansion of built-up areas mean for local ecology, and how does it affect road construction, planning and management? Associate Professor Jochen Jaeger of the Department of Geography, Planning and Environment has made such questions the focus of his research.

Jochen.jaeger@concordia.ca
(514) 848-2424 ext. 5481

 

Benefits of cycling

We all know that bicycling to work is good for your health, but what other benefits does it bring? Stéphane Brutus, RBC Professor of Motivation and Employee Performance at the John Molson School of Business can share some encouraging research findings. He can also describe his own experiences as a regular bike commuter.

Stephane.brutus@concordia.ca
(514) 848-2424 ext. 2992

Back to top

© Concordia University