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Workshops & seminars

Measuring the forest in your own backyard: A live workshop for NDG residents

Date & time

Tuesday, June 23, 2020
12 p.m. – 1 p.m.

Other dates

Monday, May 25, 2020

Cost

This event is free

Website

4TH SPACE

Where

Online

A new research project led by Concordia’s Carly Ziter, assistant professor of biology in the Faculty of Arts and Science, invites residents of Montreal’s Notre-Dame-de-Grâce neighbourhood to explore and document the trees in their own backyard!

On June 23, at 12:00 p.m., join Kayleigh Hutt Taylor, an MSc Candidate and member of Ziter’s Urban Ecology Lab, for a live workshop on how to explore, get to know, and measure the trees in your own backyard! If you live in NDG, you can submit your results to be included in the larger project.

Why measure your trees? The city’s urban tree inventory, a key resource for understanding the scope of urban forest diversity and its benefits for our communities, rarely includes information about trees on private land, which make up nearly half of all urban trees. Your contribution can help expand this important resource and deepen our understanding of urban biodiversity.

What will you need? String or twine; a pen, pencil, or marker; a notebook or downloaded worksheet; your phone or laptop with a Wi-Fi connection.

How can you participate? Register for our Zoom workshop or you can also join us by following along on our Facebook page. If the weather allows, join us directly from your backyard on your phone or laptop. We want to see your trees! #CUTrees

Can’t join us on June 23? You can participate in the project anytime by following a few simple steps to measure your trees and submit your results. Learn more here.

Have questions? Send them to info.4@concordia.ca.

Submitting your results after the workshop? Don’t forget to also share your photos on social media, using the tags #CUtrees and #CU4thSpace!


WORKSHOP FACILITATOR:

Kayleigh Hutt-Taylor, MSc Candidate, Biology


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