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Workshops & seminars

Workshop: The Good Drama

Date & time

Tuesday, April 7, 2020 –
Tuesday, June 23, 2020
7 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Speaker(s)

Sandy El Bitar

Cost

This event is free

Organization

Office of Community Engagement and the Engage Living Lab

Contact

Alex Megelas

Where

Online

The good drama is a virtual creative and fun activity. It is offered on Tuesdays from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. via Zoom.

It is a brave space to explore, experiment and take risks. It is inspired by drama therapy, theatre and clown work. The facilitator uses the imagination, art, movement, storytelling and humour to offer exercises aiming to achieve a healthy, fun and creative goal. The good drama sessions provide the participants with a context to tell their stories, set goals, solve problems, express feelings and connect with oneself and with others.

Get ready, we will move, improvise and play — and be careful — it might get creative and fun!

Facilitator: The good drama sessions will be Facilitated by Sandy El-Bitar. Sandy has an academic and experiential background in the art of theatre and clown, and psychology. She has worked as a therapeutic Clown in different paediatrics, oncology and nursing homes. She has worked as a life enrichment facilitator with people in physical, social and mental distress. She is currently finishing her Masters in Drama therapy at the university of Concordia while conducting her research on the impact of humour on resilience. Also, she is the coordinator of the Meet Me at the Mall Living lab project, in collaboration with the Art hives initiatives and Media Spa.

Sandy believes in the power of creativity, play and humour as tools to cope with challenges.

Zoom link:
https://concordia-ca.zoom.us/j/96159926660

Meeting ID: 884 847 3585

Picture of the participants and the objects that they have chosen to talk about. They shared stories, expressed emotions and thoughts in relation to these objects while being in social isolation.
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