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https://www.concordia.ca/content/shared/en/events/main/2020/01/27/cinema-politica-presents-its-opening-winter-season-film-the-mosque-with-director-and-guests.html

Films

Cinema Politica presents its opening winter season film The Mosque with director and guests

Date and time
Date & time

January 27, 2020
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Where
Where

D.B. Clarke Theatre
Henry F. Hall Building
1455 De Maisonneuve Blvd. W.
Sir George Williams Campus

Cost
Cost

Admission is by donation — $5 to 10 suggested

Wheelchair accessible
Wheelchair accessible

Yes

Speaker(s)
Speaker(s)

Ariel Nasr, Samaa Elibyari and Sarah Abou-Bakr

Contact
Contact

Kaia Singh

Join Cinema Politica Concordia for its first screening of the winter 2020 semester! The Mosque (La Mosquée: une communauté menacée) tells the poignant and resilient story of the Muslim community of Sainte-Foy, Quebec, in the aftermath of the Quebec City mosque shooting.

A question-and-answer period with director Ariel Nasr, Samaa Elibyari, a member of the Canadian Council of Muslim Women (CCMW) and Sarah Abou-Bakr, Quebec advocacy coordinator at the National Council of Canadian Muslims, will follow the screening.

This screening is part of SemaineMusulmane_MuslimWeek and is co-presented with the CCMW and the Collectif Canadien Anti-Islamophobie. Admission is by donation — $5 to $10 suggested. The venue is wheelchair accessible. Childcare available upon request with 24 hours’ notice. Please email Cinema Politica for more information.

This screening will exceptionally take place in the D.B. Clarke Theatre in Concordia's Henry F. Hall (H) Building (1455 De Maisonneuve Blvd. W.).

The Mosque: A Community’s Struggle
Ariel Nasr / Canada / 2018 / 44 ’ / English — French / partial subtitles in English

The story of the Quebec City mosque shooting — the first-ever mass shooting in a mosque in the west — is known around the world, but the story of the community that survived the attack is all but unknown.

The Mosque: A Community’s Struggle is an intimate portrait of the resilient Muslim community of Sainte-Foy, Quebec, as they struggle to survive and shift the narrative of what it means to be a Muslim, one year after the devastating attack that took the lives of six of their members. As the world moves on, this small mosque and its community fights Islamophobia, harassment and hate speech.

How will the community heal and how will they stop the rhetoric that threatens to precipitate further violence?

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