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Conferences & lectures

Concordia Research Symposium in Philosophy (CRSP) Winter 2020

What does cutting-edge research in philosophy look like? What are pressing and enduring questions it uncovers, and ways of addressing them? This event offers a taste.

Date & time

Friday, February 7, 2020
1 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Speaker(s)

Drs. Matthias Fritsch, Emilia Angelova, Ulf Hlobil, and Theodore Locke

Cost

This event is free. All are welcome.

Contact

514-848-2424 ext. 2500

Where

J.W. McConnell Building
1400 De Maisonneuve Blvd. W. Room 362, Webster Library

Wheelchair accessible

Yes

S-Annex Skylight Skylight in the Dept. of Philosophy S-Annex

Research in philosophy proves to be of diverse and wide-ranging interest.

Built on millennia of inquiry, contemporary research in philosophy covers a broad swath of topics, from enduring questions about the nature of morality and human experience, to urgent questions about how to overcome oppression. Research conducted in Concordia’s Department of Philosophy reflects this diversity, and is highly regarded in the profession. This event presents samples of this research, offering in combination a taste of today’s cutting-edge philosophy. Presentation topics include: clarifying exactly how appropriation can disrespect a culture; challenging our exploitation of the Earth based on the nature of being; why there are some things we ought to do; and how sex and gender relate to abjection. Reception to follow.

Speakers

Matthias Fritsch, “Heidegger’s Dao and the Sources of Critique”

    Commentary by Jing Hu

Emilia Angelova, "Intimate Revolt in Kristeva's Writing of Abjection"

     Commentary by Shawn Huberdeau

Ulf Hlobil, "Placing Deontic Normativity in Nature"

    Commentary by Jordan Walters

Theodore Locke, "Cultural Appropriation and Semiotic Authority"

    Commentary by Katharina Nieswandt

Travis Lacroix, "Epistemology and the Structure of Language"

    Commentary by Charles Reiss        

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