Concordia University

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Current courses

These are the course schedules for 2020-2021


WSDB 290 - Introduction to Historical Perspectives in Women's Studies
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #
Fall /2

Lec. A

-T----

11:45 – 14:30

SGW

LS 210

C. Maillé

5399

Lec. B

--W-

8:45 – 11:30

SGW

H-423

G. Painter

5398

Winter  /4

Lec. C

-T---

17:45 – 20:15

SGW

H-501

TBA

3764

This course provides an introduction to theories and writing that affect the lives of women. Through the writing of feminist authors, students examine, from mainly the 20th century, the development of feminist theories and debate. Specific authors may include Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Gloria Anzaldua, Angela Davis, Adrienne Rich, Monique Wittig, and Chandra Mohanty.


WSDB 291 - Introduction to Contemporary Concerns in Women’s Studies
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #
Fall /2

Lec. A

---J--

11:45 – 14:30

SGW

H-539

N. Batraville

6110

Winter  /4

Lec. B

-T----

11:45 - 14:30

SGW

H-403

C. Maillé

3766

Lec. C

---J--

11:45 – 14:30

SGW

H-521

N. Batraville

3765

This course explores a range of current issues and debates within feminism. Using interdisciplinary feminist theories that consider how systems of power such as patriarchy, capitalism, racism, and heterosexism constitute one another, it examines particular local and global topics of interest/concern which may include health, education, work, violence against women, globalization, militarism, media and cultural representations, families, and feminist activism.

NOTE: Students who have received credit for WSDZ 291 may not take this course for credit.


WSDB 292 - Feminisms and Research Methods
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Fall /2

Lec. A

----F-

11:45 – 14:30

SGW

LS-205

TBA

5400

Winter /4 

Lec. B

----F-

11:45 – 14:30

SGW

H-565

TBA

3767

This course exposes students to a variety of research practices from a feminist perspective. These practices can include oral history, interviews, archival research, and participant observation. Students learn how to gather, analyze, and effectively present ideas and information. Practical, hands-on exercises offer an opportunity for learning. Examination of research methods occurs in dialogue with questions of how knowledge is organized. Students are also exposed to recent developments in information literacy. This course prepares students to conduct their own research projects throughout their studies.

Prerequisite
:  Enrolment in a Women's Studies program or permission of the Institute.


WSDB 380 - Feminist Thought 1
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #
Fall /2
Sem. AA
---J-- 17:45 - 20:15 SGW H-937 V. Namaste 5401

This course seeks to deconstruct the ideological premises of knowledge-production and provides an overview of various modes of knowledge, theory, and activism among women in different cultural contexts. These types of knowledge range from storytelling to academic theorizing. The course provides key concepts and critical approaches for Feminist Thought II.

Prerequisite: See N.B. 1

NOTE:
Students who have received credit for this topic under the WSDB 398 number may not take this course for credit.


WSDB 381 - Indigenous Women and Feminism
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #
Winter /4
Sem. A
----J- 14:45 - 17:30 SGW MU 101 TBA 7051

This course aims to acquaint students with the concerns and contemporary realities of Indigenous women in North America. It examines Indigenous politics, activism, and culture through current feminist, decolonizing and post-colonial lenses. The course examines issues such as identity, representation, citizenship, land, sovereignty, nationalism, sexual and social violence, and de/re/colonization. Students develop critical thinking skills necessary to explore how sexism and racism are encoded in Canadian institutions and laws, how Indigenous women have engaged with the resulting disenfranchisement, and how they have been leading actors in Indigenous struggles, making significant contributions to their communities and nations.

Prerequisite: See N.B. 1

NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a WSDB 398 number may not take this course for credit.


WSDB 390 - Feminist Perspectives on Peace
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #
Winter /4
Sem. A
---J-- 11:45 - 14:30 SGW MB S2.445 C. Maillé 7052

Using feminist scholarship, this course covers themes such as militarism, the war industry, women in the military, war mythologies, organized and domestic violence, roles played by women during wars, wars against women, peace education and feminist peace activism.

Prerequisite: See N.B. 1


WSDB 391 - Health Issues: Feminist Perspectives
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #
Winter /4
Sem. AA
--W--- 17:45 - 20:15 SGW MB S2.445 TBA 7053

This course presents feminist, intersectional, postcolonialist, poststructuralist and queer examinations of a variety of women’s health issues. It explores the complex cultural politics that tend to legitimize existing power relations in health care, health research, and “health” industries. Topics include biopolitics and surveillance of women’s bodies, medicalization and disease mongering, patriarchal capitalism and the health industry, cosmetic surgery and oppression or agency, women’s health and sociocultural identifications, feminist medical ethics, and alternative and feminist health care.

Prerequisite: See N.B. 1


WSDB 393 - Critical Race Feminisms
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #
Fall /2
Sem. AA
----F- 14:45 - 17:30 SGW MU-101 G. Mahrouse 9332

This course explores the concepts of race, racism, and racialization, alongside feminist theories and practices. Drawing from feminist and critical race theories, the course focuses on questions of power, knowledge production, and interlocking systems of oppression within local and global contemporary contexts. It provides opportunities to reflect upon anti-racist feminist practice and to apply anti-racist analyses.

Prerequisite: See N.B. 1

NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a WSDB 398 number may not take this course for credit.


WSDB 398 - SUMMER INSTITUTE – Departures, encounters, and arrivals: Feminist approaches to migration & mobility justice studies
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Summer  /1 May 4 - May 8

Sem. GA

MTWJF

10:00 - 18:00

SGW

TBA

G. Mahrouse

3872

It brings together those who are concerned with questions, practices, and knowledge gaps that arise from critical migration/refugee studies, critical tourism studies, and/or mobility justice research. 

No requirements - 3-credits for one week - Workshops, panels, discussions - Humanities, Social Sciences, Arts.

Undergrads and Grad students welcome.  Open to community members - Mobilization and Activist initiatives.

Inquiries?  summerinstitute@concordia.ca


WSDB 398 - Selected Topics in WS: Fat Body, Disability & Sexuality Studies
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Fall /2

Sem. A

-T-J---

10:15 - 11:30

SGW

MU 101

TBA

9354

This course will examine a variety of contentious topics regarding the female body from a feminist perspective. It will examine the fat and disabled body in particular, with special attention paid to sexuality. Topics may include but are not limited to the medical gaze, the social gaze, the stare, discrimination and stigma, surveillance etc. This course will include content from a variety of scholars, and will include readings from queer and critical race theory.

Prerequisite: See N.B. 1


WSDB 398 - Selected Topics in WSDB: Canada, Colonization and Law
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Winter /4

Sem. B

-T----

14:45 - 17:30

SGW

MU-101

G. Painter

3838

With a focus on the 19th and 20th centuries, this course explores the legal, political, and social bases for Canada’s account of itself as a sovereign country. It investigates provincial and federal policies to create and consolidate ideas of national identity, and the ways these policies rest on gendered, racialized, and colonial ideologies. The course also covers Canada’s claims to territory, its framing of nature as a site of resource extraction, and the role of ideas about gender, race, and marriage in settler expansion and Indigenous dispossession. It considers the relationship between Canada, Indigenous nations, and the United Kingdom and British Empire, through the lens of treaty and through the framework offered by the Canadian constitution.

Prerequisite: See N.B. 1


WSDB 398 - Selected Topics in WSDB: Feminist Perspectives on Human Rights
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Winter /4

Sem. C

---J--

14:45 - 17:30

SGW

MB S1.255

G. Painter

7056

During the late twentieth century, human rights became a dominant frame for thinking about social justice. The ascendance of human rights generated particular forms and materials of activism, such as advocacy briefings, fact-finding reports, indicators and targets, awareness-raising campaigns, and legal pleadings. This course will question received wisdom about the role of human rights in struggles for justice, and it will critique the practical forms of human rights activism. We will study primary texts and historical, political, and anthropological readings about human rights discourse and practice. We will consider case studies, including on gender and racial equality, environmental defense, indigenous self-determination, genocide, and economic justice.

Prerequisite: See N.B. 1


WSDB 410 – Feminisms, Tourism and Mobilities
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Fall /2

Sem. A

---J-

14:45 - 17:30

SGW

MU-101

G. Mahrouse

9335

This advanced-level seminar explores gender, race, citizenship, class and sexuality as they manifest in various forms of contemporary tourism. This course, primarily concerned with issues of power, explores an interdisciplinary theoretical framework that privileges feminist transnational/postcolonial and critical race approaches. Some of the issues explored through this course include who can freely, safely and easily cross borders as well as the impacts of tourist consumption. Other themes may include the marketing and commodification of destinations and the interpersonal social encounters that tourism and travel enable.

Prerequisite: See N.B. 2

NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a WSDB 398 number may not take this course for credit.


WSDB 480 - Feminist Thought II
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Winter /4

Sem. AA

---J--

17:45 – 20:15

SGW

MB 1.301

V. Namaste

3768

While Feminist Thought I examines feminism as critique of theory in various historical and disciplinary topics, this course looks closely at the different feminist theories of the social world. The course considers fundamental concepts of Marxist feminism, post-structuralist feminist theory, feminist critical theory, and post-colonialist feminisms. Students learn how to summarize these different theoretical approaches, as well as how to think about them in a comparative manner.

Prerequisite: See N.B. 2


WSDB 490 - Feminist Ethics
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Fall /2

Sem. A

---J--

11:45 - 14:30

SGW

MB 2.255

C. Maillé

8915

This interdisciplinary seminar considers the effect of systems of gender, race, and class on women’s place in society. It takes into account recent developments in feminist scholarship in the humanities and social sciences.

Prerequisite: See N.B. 2


WSDB 491 - Feminist Perspectives on Culture
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Winter /4

Sem. A

-T---

14:45 - 17:30

SGW

H-540

N. Batraville

6341

This seminar explores the central concepts and theories in feminist cultural studies, as they inform feminist, post-colonial, queer, and post-structuralist understandings of culture. The focus is on women as cultural producers and subjects in/of various cultural texts (e.g. cinema, visual arts, music, advertising, popular media, feminist writings). The discursive construction of gender, as it is inflected by class, race, sexuality, and location, is examined as well as the ways in which it is used, displayed, imagined and performed in contemporary culture. Students develop practical and analytical skills, posing questions of how particular cultural narratives function within social, political and economic contexts. Students are required to participate in and lead discussions of the readings and to create and/or critique cultural productions.

Prerequisite: See N.B. 2


WSDB 498 - Seminar in Women's Studies: Gender Justice in Canadian Law and Policy
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #
Fall /2

Sem. A

-T----

14:45 – 17:30

SGW

MU-101

G. Painter

8987

This course is about the relationship between law and feminist thought and action in the 20th and 21st centuries. The law underpins a world shot through with injustice. Yet, those seeking justice – acting as individuals or as social movements – often turn to law for a remedy to injustice. Drawing on Audre Lorde, this course explores whether the master’s tools can dismantle the master’s house. The course will explore how structures of domination underpin the law and how law creates and perpetuates structures of domination, including patriarchy, white supremacy, economic exploitation, heteronormativity, and other forms of privilege.

Prerequisite: See N.B. 2


WSDB 498 - Ending Sexual Violence
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Fall/2

Sem. B

-T---

14:45 - 17:30

SGW

H-544

N. Batraville

9338

Examining the intersections of race and gender is key to understanding the function of sexual violence in our society. In this course, we will approach the task of ending sexual violence as one that must be taken on by simultaneously addressing other categories of systemic harm. As we read and reflect on critical theory, community organizing, and supporting survivors, our focus will largely be on the abolition of prisons and criminalization as a way to approach creating a less violent society. Drawing primarily on the work of Black feminist scholars and organizers, we will study theory in the first half of the course and praxis in the second.

Prerequisite: See N.B. 2


Interdisciplinary Studies in Sexuality

SSDB 220 - Introduction to Theories of Sexuality
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Fall /2

Sem. A

-T--

14:45 - 17:30

SGW

H-565

TBA

8693


This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to the central problems in the study of sexuality. The development over the last century of such key terms as gender, identity, sex role, sexual orientation, sexual liberation, heterosexuality, and feminist, queer, and intersectional theory are examined. The course surveys theories of sexuality as they are conceived in scientific and cultural discourses with attention to areas of overlap and difference.


SSDB 275 - Introduction to Theories of Sexuality Research
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Winter /4

Lec. A

-T---

11:45 - 14:30

SGW

H-401

N. Kouri-Towe

6543


This course surveys approaches to research in sexuality within the humanities, the arts, and the social sciences. Basic concepts of sexual identity, values, conduct, representation, and politics are addressed through such topical concerns as pornography and censorship, and the debate between biological and socio-cultural models of sexuality. The relation between theories and research methods is discussed in the context of classical and current research and creative activity.
NOTE [SSDB 275]: Students who have received credit for FASS 291 or INTE 275 may not take this course for credit.


SSDB 390 - Sexuality Theory Before Stonewall
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Fall /2

Lec. AA

--W---

17:45 – 20:15

SGW

H-544

V. Namaste

8771


An historical study of theories of sexuality before the 1969 Stonewall riots and recent feminist and intersectional analysis of sexuality, this course may include selections from among the following: Lucretius, Plato, Augustine, Shakespeare, Locke, Sade, Darwin, Freud, Kraft-Ebing, Hirschfeld, Lévi-Strauss, De Beauvoir, Mead, and Kinsey.

Prerequisites: 30 university credits; SSDB 220 or SSDB 275; or permission of the Institute. 


SSDB 426 - Practicum
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Summer /1

PRA - AA

T.B.A.

T.B.A.

SGW

T.B.A.

N. Kouri-Towe

4482

Fall /2

PRA - A

T.B.A.

T.B.A.

SGW

T.B.A.

N. Kouri-Towe

8772

Winter /4 

PRA - B

T.B.A.

T.B.A.

SGW

T.B.A.

N. Kouri-Towe

6604


This course offers a 100-hour field experience over the course of one semester. The course involves a fieldwork project undertaken under the supervision of a member of the Program Consultation Committee in Interdisciplinary Studies in Sexuality. 

Prerequisites: 60 university credits; enrolment in the Major in Interdisciplinary Studies in Sexuality; and permission of the Institute. 


SSDB 428 - Independent Study
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #
Summer /1
REA AA

T.B.A.

T.B.A.

SGW

T.B.A.

N. Kouri-Towe

4483

Fall /2

REA - A

T.B.A.

T.B.A.

SGW

T.B.A.

N. Kouri-Towe

8926

Winter /4 

REA - B

T.B.A.

T.B.A.

SGW

T.B.A.

N. Kouri-Towe

6949


This course provides the opportunity for an independent study in which the student may explore, from a feminist and intersectional perspective, a specific topic within the interdisciplinary field of sexuality.

Prerequisites: 60 university credits; enrolment in the Major or Minor in Interdisciplinary Studies in Sexuality; and permission of the Institute. 


SSDB 492 - Seminar in Advanced Topics in Sexuaity I
Term Day Time Campus Room Prof Course #

Winter /4

Sem. A

M-----

13:15 – 16:00

SGW

H-920

N. Kouri-Towe

9464


This seminar is designed to provide a setting for concentrated learning and an opportunity for advanced feminist and intersectional study on a research topic in sexuality. 

Prerequisites: 60 university credits; enrolment in the Major or Minor in Interdisciplinary Studies in Sexuality, or permission of the Institute. 

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