SCPA Courses

Description: This course introduces students to the theoretical, philosophical, and ethical foundations as well as the social logic of public policy formulation in modern societies. Using a multidisciplinary approach, it pays particular attention to the complex interaction between groups, individuals, and institutions in society, and brings students to consider issues related to the nature of the modern state, business‑government relations, the labour movement, non‑profit and community organizations, the influence of interest groups, media and international institutions on the policy agenda.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for SCPA 300 may not take this course for credit.

Description:

This course examines the interaction between civil society organizations and the state in the particular context of Quebec and Canada. It focuses on the labour movement, social movements and interest groups, and analyzes their role and influence in the policy-making process in Quebec and Canada, especially with regard to social policy, socio-economic development and human rights.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is taught in French.
  • Students who have received credit for SCPA 300 may not take this course for credit.

(also listed as POLI 204)

Description:

This course is a basic introduction to the fundamental issues of Canadian public life and the federal political system. It presents an overview of the constitution, institutions, political parties, electoral system, interest groups, and public opinion that represent the essential components of Canada’s political culture and government.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students required to take this course under Political Science as part of a major or specialization in that discipline must replace the credits with a course chosen in consultation with the SCPA advisor.

(also listed as HIST 205)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:


Description: A survey of Canadian history from Confederation to the present, emphasizing readings and discussions on selected problems.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students required to take this course under Political Science as part of a major or specialization in that discipline must replace the credits with a course chosen in consultation with the SCPA advisor.
(also listed as HIST 210)

Description: A survey of the history of Quebec from the time of Confederation until the present. While due emphasis is placed on political developments in the province, the purpose of the course is to acquaint the student with the significant economic and social trends in modern Quebec.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students required to take this course under Political Science as part of a major or specialization in that discipline must replace the credits with a course chosen in consultation with the SCPA advisor.

Description:

This course explores key concepts and paradigms of immigration, migration and diversity issues confronting nation-states around the globe and examines questions relating to illegal immigration, refugee movements, economic migrants, temporary migration and population displacement due to conflict and environmental issues and the subject of integration.

Component(s): Lecture

Description:

Based on an overview of current economic issues, this course introduces students to the fundamental analytical tools and concepts that are necessary to understand economic public policy and relevant to community development and empowerment.

Component(s): Lecture

Description:

Specific topics for this course, and relevant prerequisites, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Description:

Specific topics for this course, and relevant prerequisites, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Successful completion of Stage I is required prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied permission of the School is required.

Description:

This course emphasizes a deeper understanding of the process by which public policies are developed, implemented, and advocated, and of the role played by various institutions or groups in this process. Each year, a new set of key policy issues is selected for discussion and analysis. Students work in teams and are required to do case studies of institutions or groups relevant to the policy or public affairs issue they have chosen. The focus is on developing both communication skills, through oral and written presentations, and organizational skills as each team must organize one public panel discussion on one of the selected issues. The course takes place over the fall and winter terms.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for SCPA 401 may not take this course for credit.

Description:

This course focuses on immigration and policies as well as the social consequences of immigration and multiculturalism in Canadian and Quebec contexts. Students learn about the evolution of policy in these areas as well as covering topics such as public opinion and reactions toward immigration, advantages and challenges of multiculturalism vs. integration, and the theoretical debates surrounding immigration and models of integration (assimilation, civic integration, multiculturalism).

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Successful completion of Stage I is required prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied permission of the School is required.

Description:

This course examines and analyzes the ways in which corporate, public, and community organizations anticipate, monitor, and manage their relations with the social, political, and environmental forces which shape their operations and influence their action in their respective field. It familiarizes students with the strategies most often used in public affairs management, and develops the skills required for effective results.

Component(s): Seminar

(also listed as POLI 339)

Description:

This course is a study of the changing party structure and political issues in Quebec and their relationship to constitutional, cultural, and economic factors.

On étudiera dans ce cours l’évolution structurelle des partis et des questions politiques au Québec en fonction de facteurs d’ordre constitutionnel, culturel et économique.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • The course will be offered in both English and French on a rotational basis. Please consult the Undergraduate Class Schedule for details.
  • Students required to take this course under Political Science as part of a major or specialization in that discipline must replace the credits with a course chosen in consultation with the SCPA advisor.

  • Students who have received credit for POLI 211, POLI 339 or SCPA 211 may not take this course for credit.

Description:

The goal of this course is to share, study, and debate dimensions of community and local activism. It critically examines traditions and histories of a variety of perspectives and presents current examples of local and community activism.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ANTH 353 or SCPA 353 or SOCI 353, or for this topic under a SCPA 398 number, may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Successful completion of Stage I is required prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied permission of the School is required.

Description:

Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Successful completion of Stages I and II are required prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied permission of the School is required.

Description:

An essential part of the School’s program is a one-term apprenticeship in some aspect of community and public affairs. After completing 60 credits of the BA program, including Stages I and II, students are required to complete a practicum that will allow them to test their skills in a real situation. Placements may be drawn from all areas of possible employment, including the private sector, government and community service organizations. Students are expected to participate fully in finding and defining possible internships. Employers are asked to join in an evaluation of the work period. Students are required to submit a written report which summarizes and evaluates their work experience.

Component(s): Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Successful completion of Stages I and II are required prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied permission of the School is required.

Description:

In this course, students work in groups and are required to play out the position of a given corporate, public, or community organization in a simulation of real-life interaction between social and political actors over a particular policy issue. To this end, they must research and prepare all the necessary material (such as briefs, position papers, press kits) that will allow them to defend and make their policy position known. The actual simulation takes place in a one-day event at the end of the term.

Component(s): Seminar

Description:

This course, by examining global justice movements in the context of neo-liberal globalization, focuses on social movements, public policy and community.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Student who have received credit for this topic under a SCPA 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Successful completion of Stages I and II are required prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied permission of the School is required.

Description:

Public affairs communications is the backbone of public policy, politics and advocacy. It is a specialized communication skill set aimed at educating, driving or changing public opinion around a public policy, legislation, political candidates or issues. It includes skills such as understanding and executing public opinion research, political and advocacy campaigns, grassroots and ally development, opinion writing, advocacy advertising, and new media mobilization, among others.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for SCPA 460, SCPA 461, SCPA 465, or for this topic under a SCPA 498 number, may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course examines the experiences of immigrants and refugees in Canada, focusing on the social, cultural and political processes of their integration and/or marginalization. In this context, it explores immigrant‑based agencies and social movements, and equitable approaches to settlement services and community development to help newcomers adapt to their new environment. It also looks at integration outcomes of immigrants: employment, education, housing, participation.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed prior to enrolling: SCPA 212, SCPA 315. Enrolment in Certificate in Immigration Studies is required.

Description: This course is a field project undertaken under the auspices of a non‑profit organization working in the domain of immigration. Students in small groups are asked to work on a substantive project and/or program of significance to a community organization. The analysis provided by the students is shared with the organization enabling students to be directly involved and engaged in the field of immigration as practitioners.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Successful completion of Stages I and II are required prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied permission of the School is required.

Description: This course provides focused, in‑depth examination and analysis of a particular policy topic, public affairs issue, or problem of community development. The subject of inquiry changes every year.

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