Reflective Learning Courses

Course Notes

A core feature of co-operative education is integration: there must be integration between work and classroom learning. Numerous ways exist to foster such integration. Reflective discussion is one technique that can be used in integration sessions to encourage students to analyze, compare, and contrast their workterm experiences. Other reflective learning techniques include assignments, seminar presentations, and the keeping of logs, diaries, observation reports, and portfolios.

The CWT 101, 201, 301, and 401 Reflective Learning courses are 3credit extension courses to the work terms. These courses are marked on a pass/fail basis. They are above and beyond the credit requirements of the student’s program and are not transferable nor are they included in the full- or part-time assessment status.

Description: Students are enrolled in this course concurrently with their first work term. This is a forum for critically examining the workplace, for reflecting on personal work‑term experiences, for building and testing hypotheses, for disciplined inquiry, and for setting goals. Activities provide opportunities for students to connect their work‑term experiences to their related courses.

Description: Students are enrolled in this course concurrently with their second work term. Using one or more of the techniques listed in CWT 101 , this course expands on students’ second work‑term experiences in their related field of study to further develop their knowledge and work-related skills.

Description: Students are enrolled in this course concurrently with their third work term. Using one or more of the techniques listed in CWT 101, this course expands on students’ third work‑term experiences in their related field of study to further develop their knowledge and work-related skills.

Description: Students are enrolled in this course concurrently with their fourth work term. Using one or more of the techniques listed in CWT 101, this course expands on students’ fourth work‑term experiences in their related field of study to further develop their knowledge and work‑related skills.

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