Concordia University

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Philosophy

Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Philosophy)

Admission Requirements. An honours degree in philosophy, or its equivalent. Qualified applicants requiring prerequisite courses may be required to take up to 12 undergraduate credits in addition to and as a part of the regular graduate program. Applicants with deficiencies in their undergraduate preparation may be required to take a qualifying program.

Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements and exemptions.

Requirements for the Degree

  1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits.

  2. Options. Students may enter one of the two options, A or B, outlined below.

  3. Cross-registration. Graduate students in philosophy at Concordia University may take for credit the equivalent of 6 credits at the Université de Montréal, McGill University, or the Université du Québec à Montréal. Courses taken elsewhere may be accepted as credit for one graduate-level course in the Department of Philosophy. Permission for such a substitution must be granted by the Graduate Program Director in the Department of Philosophy, and approval from the other university or department involved must be obtained.

Master of/Magisteriate in Arts with Research Paper (Option A)

Candidates are required to take the following:

  1. Courses. 18 course credits, with the following distribution requirement: (a) at least three credits in history of philosophy; (b) at least three credits in aesthetics, moral philosophy, or social and political philosophy; (c) at least three credits in metaphysics, epistemology or philosophy of science.

  2. Research Paper. Students write one major research paper (PHIL 693, 27 credits) on a topic to be determined in consultation with a faculty member, who serves as the supervisor. The student’s proposal for the research paper is vetted by the Philosophy Graduate Studies Committee, and should be submitted before May 1 of the first year of full-time study, or the second year in the case of part-time study. A research paper is expected to consider all of the relevant scholarship pertaining to its argument and to make an original contribution to knowledge. An oral defence of the research paper is required before an examining committee consisting of the supervisor and one other professor chosen by the Graduate Program Director in consultation with the supervisor. The Research Paper is graded Accepted or Rejected.

Master of/Magisteriate in Arts with Thesis (Option B)

Candidates are required to take the following:

  1. Courses: 18 course credits, with the following distribution requirement: (a) at least three credits in history of philosophy; (b) at least three credits in aesthetics, moral philosophy, or social and political philosophy; (c) at least three credits in metaphysics, epistemology or philosophy of science.

  2. Thesis. Students write a thesis (PHIL 696, 27 credits) on a topic to be determined in consultation with a faculty member. The thesis is written under the guidance of a member of the Department. The student’s research proposal is vetted by the Philosophy Graduate Studies Committee, and should be submitted before May 1 of the first year of full-time study, or the second year in the case of part-time study. A master’s thesis in philosophy is expected to make an original contribution to knowledge. An oral defence of the thesis is required before an examining committee consisting of the supervisor and two other professors chosen by the Graduate Program Director in consultation with the thesis supervisor. The thesis is graded Accepted or Rejected.

Academic Regulations

  1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a detailed review of the Academic Regulations.

  2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study.

  3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time Limit requirements.

  4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00.

Courses

All courses are worth 3 credits unless otherwise noted.

A. History of Philosophy

PHIL 607 Kant
This course studies Kant and his work in its historical context, such as the Critique of Pure Reason or other texts of Kant.

PHIL 609 Selected Topics in the History of Philosophy
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PHIL 609A, PHIL 609B, etc.

PHIL 612 Ancient Philosophy
This course studies the texts central to the development of ancient philosophical thought, such as works by Plato and Aristotle.
Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 601 or PHIL 602 may not take this course for credit.

PHIL 613 Medieval Philosophy
This course analyzes and discusses texts central to the development of medieval philosophical thought, in the Arabic and Latin traditions. Works by Avicenna, Averroes, and Thomas Aquinas are studied.
Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 604 may not take this course for credit.

PHIL 614 Modern Philosophy
This course studies central problems of 17th- and 18th-century European philosophy, from Bacon and Galileo at the beginning of the Scientific Revolution, through continental Rationalism (e.g., Descartes and Leibniz), to Hume and the legacy of British Empiricism.

PHIL 615 19th-Century Philosophy
This course studies the work of 19th-century philosophers in their historical context, such as Goethe, Schelling, Herder, and Hegel.

PHIL 616 Selected Topics in the History and Philosophy of Science
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PHIL 616A, PHIL 616B, etc.

PHIL 617 Origins of Analytic Philosophy
This course provides an analysis of some of the central philosophical works in the analytic tradition from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Works by central figures such as Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein or Carnap are covered.
Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 663 may not take this course for credit.

PHIL 618 Origins of Continental Philosophy
Students study the sources of contemporary continental European thought in the 19th century and early 20th century, which are traced to German Idealism and Romanticism, Marxism, and early phenomenology. Authors studied may include Kant, Fichte, Schelling, Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Husserl.
Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 662 may not take this course for credit.

B. Aesthetics, Moral Philosophy, or Social and Political Philosophy

PHIL 621 Value Theory
Students examine a topic in value theory, such as the exploration of different conceptions of well-being, the good, or of virtues.

PHIL 623 Issues in Ethical Theory
Students analyse central theories in normative ethics such as consequentialism, deontology, and contractualism; and in meta-ethnics such as realism, relativism, and moral nihilism.

PHIL 624 Moral Problems
Students investigate one or more approaches to difficult moral problems that confront us today, such as the need to find appropriate responses to war, revolution, tyranny, terrorism, global poverty, violence against women, and abortion.

PHIL 625 Aesthetics
This course examines central problems in the history of aesthetics and the philosophy of art, including the nature of beauty, the sublime, and the ontology of a work of art; or a study of a single text or author, such as Aristotle’s Poetics or Kant’s Critique of Judgment.

PHIL 626 Political Philosophy
This course investigates central theories in political philosophy, concerning distributive justice, the theory of just war, democracy, civil disobedience, freedom of speech, responsibilities to future generations, human rights, global justice, multiculturalism, liberalism, socialism, anarchism, or feminism.

PHIL 627 Marx
Students study central works by Karl Marx. The course may also address important interpretations of Marx’s work, such as those developed by Analytic Marxists, Sartre, Althusser, Lukacs, or the Frankfurt School.

PHIL 628 Philosophy of Law
This course studies a central issue in philosophy of law, such as personality, property, rights, interpretation, responsibility, and punishment; or the jurisprudential perspective of such figures as Hart, Dworkin, Alexy, Luhmann, Weinrib, Waldron, Greenberg, Finnis, and Murphy.
Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 675 may not take this course for credit.

PHIL 631 Theories of Justice
This course examines important philosophical contributions to debates about justice, such as distributive justice, political justice, human rights, global justice, and inter-generational justice.

PHIL 632 Environmental Philosophy
This course provides an analysis of the basic assumptions underlying one or more philosophical views of the natural world, such as ethical, aesthetic and ecofeminist theories as well as the theory of deep ecology.

PHIL 633 Selected Topics in Value Theory
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PHIL 633A, PHIL 633B, etc.

C. Metaphysics, Epistemology or Philosophy of Science

PHIL 634 Selected Topics in Epistemology
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PHIL 634A, PHIL 634B, etc.

PHIL 643 Selected Topics in Metaphysics
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PHIL 643A, PHIL 643B, etc.
Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a PHIL 640 or PHIL 642 number may not take this course for credit.

PHIL 644 Philosophy of Science
This course provides an analysis of philosophical issues raised by science, such as those concerning scientific evidence, concepts, theories, and explanation; or the intersection with ethical and social problems.
Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 650 or 657 may not take this course for credit.

PHIL 645 Philosophy of Mathematics
This course investigates some of the central issues and theories in the philosophy of mathematics such as logicism, intuitionism, or formalism. Other topics may include the nature of mathematical truth or the ontology and epistemology of mathematics.

PHIL 646 Philosophy of Language
Students analyse some aspects of the philosophy of language, such as the nature of meaning, the relation between language and thought, or the relation between language and the world.
Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 651 may not take this course for credit.

PHIL 647 Philosophy of Mind
Students investigate central issues in the philosophy of mind, such as the architecture and modularity of the mind, the mind-body problem and mental causation, or the metaphysics and function of consciousness.
Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 664 may not take this course for credit.

PHIL 648 Philosophy of Social Science
Students study methods of various social and human sciences and the differences in aims between, for instance, understanding, explaining, experiencing, and being liberated from oppression.
Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under a PHIL 655 number may not take this course for credit.

PHIL 649 Phenomenology
Drawing from classical and recent phenomenlogical philosophy, students study selected central figures such as Husserl, Heidegger, and issues such as meaning, the body, temporality, and phenomenological reduction.
Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 668 may not take this course for credit.

PHIL 652 Selected Topics in Logic
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PHIL 652A, PHIL 652B, etc.
Note: Students who have received credit for PHIL 611 may not take this course for credit.

PHIL 656 Selected Topics in Analytic Philosophy
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PHIL 656A, PHIL 656B, etc.
Note: Students who have received credit for this topic under PHIL 666 may not take this course for credit.

PHIL 658 Selected Topics in Continental Philosophy
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PHIL 658A, PHIL 658B, etc.

PHIL 659 Selected Topics in Metaphysics, Epistemology, or Philosophy of Science
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this course provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PHIL 659A, PHIL 659B, etc.

To be classified each year by the Graduate Program Director:

PHIL 672 Tutorial
PHIL 678 Topics in Current Research
PHIL 698 The Teaching of Philosophy

Research Paper and Thesis

PHIL 693 Research Paper (27 credits)
PHIL 696 Thesis (27 credits)

Cognate Courses

Students may enrol in certain courses in the Departments of Education, Political Science, and Religion with permission of the Philosophy Graduate Program Director and the second department involved.

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