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GPLL234 - Choosing the right journal for your research: predatory publishers & open access

This workshop will help participants understand predatory publishing and recognize how predatory journals operate within academic publishing. Scholarly publishing and Open Access will also be discussed as well as how to locate, research and publish in reputable academic journals.

IMPORTANT NOTE
Participants must bring their own laptop with them to the workshop. If you do not have a laptop, you can borrow one from the circulation desk at the library.

Learning Objectives



By the end of the session, participants will be able to:
1. Define Open Access;
2. Identify the types of predatory publishers and their characteristics;
3. Explain how predatory journals can be harmful for authors and for academic research;
4. Use tools to identify whether a journal is reliable or predatory.

Leaders Information



This workshop is led by Katharine Hall, Michelle Lake, Danielle Dennie.

Katharine Hall is the Subject Librarian for Biology and Exercise Science. She holds a BSc in Biochemistry from McMaster University and a Master of Library & Information Science from the University of Western Ontario.

Michelle Lake is the Government Publications Librarian and the Subject Librarian for Political Science, the School of Community and Public Affairs and First Peoples Studies. She holds a BA in English and History from the University of Guelph, and a Master of Library & Information Science from the University of Western Ontario.

Danielle Dennie is the Librarian responsible for scholarly communications and digital course reserves. She holds a BSc in Biochemistry from Laurentian University, an MSc in Environmental Microbiology from INRS–Institut Armand-Frappier, and a Masters in Library and Information Science from McGill University.

This workshop is not scheduled at this time.
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