Concordia University

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Graduate programs

Apprenticeship and research partnership

Mechanical Engineering students in a Master of Applied Science (MASc) or a Doctorate program can spend up to 50% of their degree working on industry projects related to their area of interest: first in the form of an apprenticeship, followed a research partnership for thesis-related research.

Apprenticeship

MASc and PhD students in this program begin with a four- to six-month graduate apprenticeship with partnering company or institution. The student undertakes the apprenticeship to become familiar with the aerospace industrial environment, and learn the business through experience.

At the end of the apprenticeship, students are expected to come away with a big-picture understanding of the aerospace industry, and a topic of interest for a thesis. If the apprenticeship takes place outside of Montreal, coursework can begin once the student returns to Concordia.

Research partnership

Graduate students have the opportunity to collaborate with an industrial partner* for a thesis topic. The student spends another four to six months conducting research on-site with the industrial partner, co-supervised by a subject matter expert in industry, and Dr. Marsden.

Following the on-site research, the student returns to Concordia to finish writing, defending, and submitting the thesis.

*The student should select different partners for the apprenticeship and thesis-related research.

Recommended program sequence for a September admission

Year 1
  • Term 1 (September – December) Apprenticeship in industry
  • Term 2:  (January – May): Coursework
Year 2
  • Term 1 (May – August): Thesis-related research term in industry.
    • You may complete your coursework if the industry partner is local
  • Term 2 (September – December): Complete course work and thesis literature review
  • Term 3 (January – May): Complete, submit and defend thesis... and graduate!
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