Concordia University

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Faculty Council

Faculty Council is the legislative body within the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science that has responsibility for good governance of the academic affairs of the Faculty. The composition of Faculty Council is representative of the academic units in the Faculty, undergraduate and graduate student associations, the Office of the Dean, and other senior academic administrators. In addition, Faculty Council invites participation from representatives of designated administrative units and University bodies.

The purview of Faculty Council differs from, but is complementary to, the administrative and governance functions of the Office of the Dean, which is responsible for setting academic priorities within the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science and managing the Faculty in accordance with Collective Agreements and other University policies. Faculty Council is also the body within the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science that is responsible for making recommendations on academic matters to Senate.

Faculty Council has responsibility for three general areas of activity. First, it oversees the development of academic curricula and programs. Second, it monitors compliance with academic regulations by overseeing the handling of student requests and making recommendations regarding graduation and degree conferrals, as well as recommending or granting awards and titles. Third, Faculty Council requests and considers reports relating to the academic affairs of the Faculty and the University, and makes recommendations to Senate and other University bodies emanating from its deliberations.

In setting academic policies for the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science, Faculty Council is obliged to conform to criteria and guidelines established by Senate. This does not preclude Council from seeking the authorization of Senate to implement more stringent policies or requirements within the Faculty.

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