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Winter is snow joke

Try this Concordia alum's 6 tips
November 30, 2018
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By Meagan Boisse

Winter is snow joke

Dearest citizens of Concordia, as you’re probably well aware, winter has reared its cold, snowy head.

While some among you may have been overcome with childlike glee upon looking out at today's prodigious snowfall, for others (most notably myself) these first days of Serious Wintertide tend to translate into the commuter’s version of Dante’s Inferno.

But while there is plenty of time to reflect upon the tilting of the earth’s axis as you traverse the seven layers of traffic Hell, winter is not all doom and gloom.

In fact, as a lifelong Montrealer, I like to fancy myself somewhat of an expert when it comes to extracting warmth and joy out of the season. To this end, I have put together a handy list to help you do the same.
 

6 snowy-day tips for Concordians
 

1. Sort out your commute

Always have the number of your local transit authority nearby. Whether you're travelling by bus, train or metro, don’t be afraid to call and pester them before leaving your house to make sure your chosen method of transportation is running on time (especially if it’s stormy).

Bad weather could mean possible delays, so this precautionary measure might save you from unnecessarily freezing your butt off while waiting for a bus that isn’t coming.
 

2. Go underground

No need to expose yourself to the blustery winds of winter: Montreal’s Underground City is a subterranean haven from the cold. With 32 km of tunnels that cover 12 square kilometers of the city’s downtown core, you can find everything you need without ever having to go above ground.
 

3. Head down ... hill

Sub-zero temperatures don’t scare you? Good. Skiing is a seasonal staple, and you’re missing out if you don’t take advantage of the fact that Montreal is ideally situated for day trips to nearby ski resorts.

Bromont is less than an hour’s drive from downtown and charges only $53 for its night trails.

Mont Blanc, aka the place I broke my leg, is a little more than an hour away and boasts the second highest ski peak in the Laurentian region. Bonus: it costs $57 for a full day ticket.

If you’re planning on skiing often but are limited in terms of cash flow there’s Saint Sauveur. Also close by, this mountain resort offers a dirt-cheap pass for $299 to skiers between 6 and 25 years old (valid all winter.)

Mont-Saint-Bruno, on Montreal’s South Shore, and Mont Rigaud, just off the western tip of the Island of Montreal, are two other options closer to home.
 

4. Head up ... Mont Royal

For winter thrills even closer to campus, head up to Mont Royal. The park offers ice skating on Beaver Lake, as well as cross-country skiing and snowshoe trails and tobogganing. If you don’t have your own gear, you can rent skis or skates or snowshoes at the Beaver Lake Pavilion.

Most public parks around the city also have outdoor skating rinks. For information on ice conditions, check the City of Montreal website.
 

5. Go for a bike ride

Yup, that's correct.

Just because it’s snowing doesn’t mean you have to put your bike away; invest in fenders, put on a pair of slick tires (which cut through slush and snow rather than riding on top of it) and keep your chain from becoming a winter casualty by coating it with cycle-specific winter lube.

 

6. Find a cozy place to enjoy a warm beverage

Who needs natural sunlight when you can drink chocolate? A cup of cocoa’s power to combat the winter blues cannot be underestimated.

You can grab a delicious cup of hot chocolate at the Hive Cafés, located on both campuses. Also, the dining halls and cafés run by Concordia’s Food Services offer a selection of toasty drinks.


Wondering what else to do on campus? Check out Concordia's Student Services.

 



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