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Workshops & seminars

PERFORM Colloquium - Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Gaining Momentum as a Tool for Biomedical Research

Date & time

Wednesday, October 19, 2016
4 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Speaker(s)

Ian R. Lanza, PhD

Cost

This event is free

Organization

PERFORM Centre

Contact

Wendy Kunin
514-848-2424 ext. 5295

Where

Loyola Jesuit Hall and Conference Centre
7141 Sherbrooke W. Room 120

Wheelchair accessible

No

Ian-Lanza

Energy metabolism is critical to human health and disease. Investigators have been studying human energy metabolism in various ways for many decades to gain insights into etiology of disease and effectiveness of therapies.

This talk focuses on some emerging methodologies to leverage the non-invasive power of magnetic resonance for studies of human metabolism. It will include:

• How phosphorous magnetic resonance can be used to probe muscle energy metabolism
• How multinuclear MRS can be used to monitor multiple signals
• MRI/MRS for evaluating body composition.

Speaker Bio: Dr. Ian R. Lanza completed his PhD in human physiology from the University of Massachusetts. He trained as a postdoc at Mayo Clinic and joined as faculty in the Division of Endocrinology in 2010. Ongoing research in his lab is focused on discovering effective, realistic and economical approaches to prevent and treat metabolic disorders in the context of obesity, aging and physical inactivity. Skeletal muscle is of great interest to Dr. Lanza because it is critically important to maintaining physical function and metabolic health throughout the life span. Dr. Lanza's research involves preclinical studies as well as translational mechanistic intervention studies in humans. An area of particular interest is the impact of lifestyle factors such as exercise and nutrition on skeletal muscle function, energy metabolism and adaptations to exercise. Dr. Lanza also is the Director of the Metabolomics Core Laboratory; a mass spectrometry facility that specializes in quantitative measurements of small molecules in biological fluids and tissues.


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