Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/shared/en/events/artsci/polisci/wssr/2019/02/01/hughesworkshop.html

Workshops & seminars, Conferences & lectures

Poverty and Politics: How to get the issue on the electoral agenda

with James Hughes, Executive Lead, Government and Partner Relations, J.W. McConnell Foundation
Date and time
Date & time

February 1, 2019
9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Where
Where

Henry F. Hall Building
1455 De Maisonneuve W.
Sir George Williams Campus

Cost
Cost

Participants must register to attend: Register here

Wheelchair accessible
Wheelchair accessible

Yes

Speaker(s)
Speaker(s)

James Hughes
Executive Lead, Government and Partner Relations, J.W. McConnell Foundation

Contact
Contact

WSSR Coordinator
514-848-2424 x7854, x5473

We see poverty everyday in the form of lineups at the foodbanks, homeless shelters bursting to the seams, single parents unable to sign their kids up for sports teams and overcrowding in public housing. What is poverty and how is it defined? What we can do about it? And how can we galvanize politicians into leading efforts to reduce it? 

In this workshop, James Hughes, Executive Lead at the Montreal-based McConnell Foundation and former Deputy Minister of Social Development in New Brunswick, will engage workshop participants in a wide-ranging discussion on the topic of poverty. He will explore the various facets, dimensions and definitions of poverty, discuss the last decade of poverty reduction initiatives across Canada, including the most recent announcement of the first ever federal poverty reduction plan, and citing numerous examples, ask how poverty issues get taken up and acted upon within the political process. A case study on New Brunswick's anti-poverty efforts will be highlighted in the workshop. Participants will also get the experience of living in poverty by playing the "Poverty Game". If you're interested in the issues of poverty, the social determinants of health, public policy development or politics, you're sure to enjoy this workshop.




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