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http://www.concordia.ca/content/shared/en/events/artsci/polisci/wssr/2018/03/22/hivontalk.html

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Workshops & seminars, Conferences & lectures

A New Quebec: The future of the independence movement

An Evening with...
Véronique Hivon, Vice-Cheffe of the Parti Québécois and Official Opposition Critic for Justice, Family and End-of-Life Care
Date & time

Thursday, March 22, 2018
6:30 p.m. – 7:45 p.m.

Speaker(s)

Véronique Hivon
Vice-Chieffe of the Parti Québécois and Official Opposition Critic for Justice, Family and End-of-Life Care
Aphrodite Salas (Moderator)

Cost

Participants must register to attend

Contact

WSSR Coordinator
514-848-2424 x7854, x5473

Where

John Molson Building
1450 Guy Room : Please register to receive room details

Wheelchair accessible

No

Although some often decree its end, the Quebec sovereignty movement may still be alive and well. It has evolved, the reasons for independence are no longer exactly the same as those that prevailed in 1980 and in 1995, but the project is still relevant and, some argue, that it is also necessary.

As a former leader of the Parti Québécois once said, the party created by René Lévesque does not have the "monopoly of sovereignty’’, this project is also supported by movements in civil society, and another party in the National Assembly. The challenge for the movement over the next few years will be to bring together the sovereignists, to gather them around what unites them and to show how Quebec's independence would be beneficial for Quebec, for the full development of our society, concretely, and for all Quebecers, regardless of their spoken language, origin, age, etc. In order to succeed, the sovereignist movement will need to be inclusive, because the country of Quebec will need to be built together, everyone will be a part of it and we would all be the founders.

On March 22nd, join Véronique Hivon, Vice-chieffe of the Parti Québécois and MNA for Joliette, as she explains her vision of the future of the independence movement.




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