Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/shared/en/events/artsci/polisci/wssr/2017/11/10/jimenezworkshop.html

Workshops & seminars, Conferences & lectures

Feminist Teachers, Intersectional Pedagogies, and the Future of Feminism-in-Schools

with Ileana Jiménez,
Founder, Feminist Teacher
Date and time
Date & time

November 10-11, 2017
9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Where
Where

Henry F. Hall Building
1455 De Maisonneuve W.
Sir George Williams Campus

Cost
Cost

Participants must register to attend: Register here

Wheelchair accessible
Wheelchair accessible

Yes

Speaker(s)
Speaker(s)

Ileana Jiménez
Founder, Feminist Teacher

Contact
Contact

WSSR Coordinator
514-848-2424 x7854

Feminist teachers are the now and future of feminism. In single sex and coed, public and private schools, the feminism-in-schools movement has emerged with an exciting force within a broad spectrum of contexts globally, including Canada and the U.S. This two-day workshop will focus on the ways in which high school teachers are using feminist theory and pedagogy to re-imagine curriculum design, student assessments, and student activism.

Over two days, participants will first be introduced to the feminism-in-schools movement in both the global north and south, including Australia, Canada, India, the U.S. and U.K. and its engagement in anti-racist, feminist, and queer pedagogies. Jiménez will take participants through several examples of digital literacies (e.g., blogs, videos, Instagram, etc.) and activist initiatives by feminist high school students, paying close attention to the particular global contexts that inform the urgency of their vision for change and political action. She will also introduce workshop participants to the larger political and social implications of doing feminism-in-schools on feminist teachers themselves, and the emotional and intellectual labor they carry. Finally, she will explore the feminism-in-schools work being done in Quebec and Ontario to re-imagine education in Canadian classrooms through an intersectional feminist lens.




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