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The Centre for Human Relations and Community Studies has been engaged in research and programming aimed at improving the quality of life in human systems. Join us as we dive deeper into understanding the human dimension of organizations and the social environment.

  • Grey Zone Change & Calm Leadership: Leading self and others through #COVID-19
    Posted on May 14, 2020 | By Dr. Yabome Gilpin-Jackson
    When I am asked what characteristics define what I call Grey Zone Change (a space between the current state and an emerging future that is undefined and unknowable), I usually provide these seven characteristics…and that was before #COVID-19. Read more
  • Re-Setting Your Inner GPS in this Global Crisis
    Posted on April 20, 2020 | By Jim Gavin
    Baba Ram Dass wrote in his book, How can I help?, that you only ever help yourself. As a psychologist I’ve been ‘helping’ people for quite a while now– and I know how much of what I learned about human suffering I have been able to apply to the suffering being in me. Read more
  • PART 3: Navigate the Grey Zone of Change with Powerful Questions & Co-Created Action
    Posted on June 27, 2019 | By Dr. Yabome Gilpin-Jackson
    GREY ZONE BLOG SERIES: I had the opportunity to spend the past week at Concordia University, and did a session with the Centre for Human Relations and Community Studies on Living, Leading and Facilitating in the Grey Zone of Change. We focused our inquiry on the question: How do we live, lead and facilitate in the grey zone of change? Read more
  • PART 2: Working, Leading & Facilitating in the Grey Zone of Change
    Posted on June 13, 2019 | By Dr. Yabome Gilpin-Jackson
    GREY ZONE BLOG SERIES: The Grey Zone of Change requires us to engage differently than our default learned behaviours. This is why working, leading or facilitating in the grey zone may not be easy. It requires more mental energy and focused attention than our defaults. It requires us to get out of autopilot. Read more
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