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Creative Arts Therapies

Section 81.80

Please note that the current version of the Undergraduate Calendar is up to date as of February 2017.

Faculty

Chair
YEHUDIT SILVERMAN, MA Lesley University; Associate Professor

Professors
SANDRA CURTIS, PhD Concordia University
STEPHEN SNOW, PhD New York University

Associate Professors
BONNIE HARNDEN, MA Concordia University
LOUISE LACROIX, MFA Concordia University
JOSÉE LECLERC, PhD Concordia University
JANIS TIMM‑BOTTOS, PhD University of New Mexico
GUYLAINE VAILLANCOURT, PhD Antioch University
LAUREL YOUNG, PhD Temple University


Location

Sir George Williams Campus
Visual Arts Building, Room: VA 264
514‑848‑2424, ext. 4790
concordia.ca/finearts/creative-arts-therapies


Department Objectives

The Department of Creative Arts Therapies offers select undergraduate courses that provide students with diverse ranges of concepts and practices in the field of arts in health. The Department offers a program of study with options of specialization in either Art Therapy, Drama Therapy, or Music Therapy, all leading to the degree of Master/Magisteriate of Arts in Creative Arts Therapies. In addition, the Department offers a Graduate Diploma in Music Therapy.
These undergraduate courses at the 300 level are prerequisites for admission to either the Art Therapy MA Option, the Drama Therapy MA Option, or the Graduate Diploma in Music Therapy. These courses are designed to provide prospective students with a foundation in either Art Therapy, Drama Therapy, or Music Therapy.


Courses

CATS 210           Introduction to Creative Arts Therapies (3 credits)
Students are introduced to the basic concepts and practices of creative arts therapies, including visual art, drama, music, and dance. Students study general theories and themes common to all of the creative arts therapies that may include creative projection, the role of the witness, expression, symbols, meaning making, and therapeutic alliance. These themes are explored through readings, videos, assignments, blogs and creative journals. Students are introduced to specific sites where creative arts therapists practise with diverse populations to gain a basic understanding of how the creative arts therapies function and the range of professional practices.
 
Art Therapy:
This course is intended as partial preparation for graduate studies in the field of art therapy.

ATRP 301           An Introduction to Art Therapy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits; PSYC 200 or equivalent; six credits in Studio Arts. This course provides an introduction to the subject and profession of art therapy, including its history, key processes, and selected approaches. Didactic and experiential components provide students with a broad understanding of the application of basic concepts in art therapy.

Drama Therapy:
This course is intended as partial preparation for graduate studies in the field of drama therapy.

DTHY 301           An Introduction to Drama Therapy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits; PSYC 200 or equivalent; permission of the Department of Creative Arts Therapies. This course provides an introduction to the subject and profession of drama therapy, including its history, key processes, and selected approaches. Didactic and experiential components provide students with a broad understanding of the application of basic concepts in drama therapy.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for TDEV 421, DFHD 421, or DINE 420 may not take this course for credit.

Music Therapy:
This course is intended as partial preparation for graduate studies in the field of music therapy.

MTHY 301          An Introduction to Music Therapy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits; PSYC 200 or equivalent; six credits in Music. This course provides an introduction to the subject and profession of music therapy, including its history, key processes, and selected approaches. Didactic and experiential components provide students with a broad understanding of the application of basic concepts in music therapy.

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