Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/undergraduate/calendar/current/sec81/81-10.html

Faculty of Fine Arts

Section 81

Please note that the current version of the Undergraduate Calendar is up to date as of February 2017.

Dean
REBECCA DUCLOS, PhD University of Manchester

Associate Deans
ANA CAPPELLUTO, MEd McGill University; Planning and Academic Facilities
MARK SUSSMAN, PhD New York University; Academic Affairs
ANNE WHITELAW, PhD Concordia University; Research


Location

Sir George Williams Campus
Engineering, Computer Science and Visual Arts Complex, Room: EV 2.705
514-848-2424, ext. 4600
concordia.ca.finearts


Objectives

The Faculty of Fine Arts is recognized internationally for its long-standing record of excellence in undergraduate education in the visual, performing, cinematic, design, and electronic arts. The Faculty strives to create an environment that reflects the openness and diversity of contemporary culture, with a strong commitment to integrating new technologies with traditional fine arts practices. Programs and courses in studio or academic disciplines situate students within both the pluralism of the university academic experience and an active urban arts milieu.


81.10     PROGRAMS AND ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

General admission requirements are listed in §13. Specific requirements for admission to the various programs leading to the BFA degree are set out in the first column of the following listings. They refer to the table of Cegep profiles and other specific requirements defined below.

Profile
 
Requirements
 
0.00
 
Diploma of Collegial Studies (DEC — Diplôme d’études collégiales)
 
10.12
 
Mathematics 103, 105, 203
 
A
 
Interview/Audition
 
G
 
Letter of intent
 
K Submission of a portfolio of representative work

Programs offered:
For information concerning any of the following programs, please consult the calendar section listed opposite each program.

Recommended                
Profile and
Specific
Requirements
Program Calendar Section
  Specializations:  
     
0.00, A,G Acting for the Theatre 81.120
0.00, G,K Art Education – Visual Arts 81.40
0.00, A,G,K Design for the Theatre 81.120
0.00, G,K Film Production 81.60
0.00 Film Studies 81.60
0.00, A Jazz Studies 81.100
0.00, A Music Performance 81.100
0.00, A Music Composition 81.100
0.00, A,G Performance Creation 81.120
     
  Majors:  
     
0.00, G,K Art Education – Visual Arts 81.40
0.00 Art History 81.50
0.00 Art History and Film Studies 81.50, 81.60
0.00, G,K Art History and Studio Art 81.50
0.00, G,K Ceramics 81.110
0.00, 10.12, G,K Computation Arts 81.90
0.00, A Contemporary Dance 81.70
0.00, G,K Design 81.90
0.00, G,K Electroacoustic Studies 81.100
0.00, G,K Fibres and Material Practices 81.110
0.00, G,K Film Animation 81.60
0.00, G,K Film Production 81.60
0.00 Film Studies 81.60
0.00, G,K Intermedia (Video, Performance and Electronic Arts) 81.110
0.00, A Music 81.100
0.00, G,K Painting and Drawing 81.110
0.00, G,K Photography 81.110
0.00, G,K Print Media 81.110
0.00, G,K Sculpture 81.110
0.00, G,K Studio Art 81.110
     
  Minors:  
     
0.00, G,K Art Education – Visual Arts 81.40
0.00 Art History 81.50
0.00, G Cinema 81.60
0.00, G,K Computation Arts 81.90
0.00, G,K Electroacoustic Studies 81.100
0.00, G,K Film Animation 81.60
0.00 Film Studies 81.60
0.00, G,K Game Design 81.90
0.00 Interdisciplinary Studies in Sexuality 81.30
0.00, Theory Test Music 81.100
0.00, G,K Photography 81.110
0.00, G,K Print Media 81.110
0.00 Theatre 81.120

 


Transfer Students

Applicants who have completed courses in other colleges or universities may be granted transfer credits towards their program at Concordia University. These transfer credits will normally be awarded as general credits and as such may not be equivalent to specific first-year courses at Concordia.
Applicants to a second undergraduate degree must complete a minimum of 60 credits, other than those credited towards the first degree, at least 36 of which must be taken in the new field of specialization (§16.2.2). Students transferring credits towards a first degree must complete a minimum of 45 credits at Concordia (see §16.2.2).
Students must complete all program and degree requirements, as well as the Faculty of Fine Arts residence requirements (see §81.20.2).


Mature Entry

General admission requirements to the 108-credit program (Mature Entry) are listed in §14. Students admitted into the Faculty of Fine Arts through the Mature Entry plan are required to complete 18 credits in addition to the 90 credits normally required for the BFA degree.


Extended Credit Program

Definition of the Extended Credit Program (ECP) is listed in §13.2. Students admitted to an Extended Credit Program in Fine Arts are required to complete an additional 30 credits for the degree. Transfer credits awarded for Ontario Academic Courses (OACs) must be applied towards the ECP portion of a student’s degree program.


81.20     DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Students preparing for the BFA degree require a minimum of 90 credits. Each credit represents, for the average student, a minimum of 45 hours of work spread across lectures, conferences, tutorials, studios, rehearsals or practice periods, tests, examinations, and personal work.


81.20.1     BFA Degree Requirements

  1. A candidate for the BFA degree must have qualified for admission to, and successfully completed a program of concentration in the form of a specialization (see §16.2.4) or major (see §16.2.4) program in the Faculty of Fine Arts. A selection is made upon entry, prior to registration. The requirement of selecting a program upon entry should not be thought of as being neces-sarily a final commitment. Students wishing to transfer out of one degree program must satisfy the admission requirements of the program they seek to enter. Program changes are, however, subject to limitations where certain programs are in great demand. Students should be aware that to effect certain transfers they may be required to complete more than the 90 credits normally required for the degree.
  2. A candidate for graduation must satisfy the Fine Arts General Education requirement by successfully completing a minimum of six credits from course offerings outside the Fine Arts academic sectors (Visual Arts and Performing Arts). The non-Fine Arts academic sectors are defined as: Humanities, Social Sciences, Sciences, Business, Engineering and Computer Science.
    BFA students graduating with the Major in Computation Arts – Option Computer Applications double program or the Specialization in Art Education – Visual Arts will be considered as having satisfied the General Education requirement.
    The courses FLIT 382; COMS 301, 304, 416, 434 can only be applied within a student’s degree as electives from the Visual Arts sector and therefore do not fulfill the General Education requirement. This list is subject to modification.
  3. A candidate for graduation must have successfully completed the course FFAR 2506.
  4. A candidate for graduation normally may apply no more than 54 credits in studio work towards the 90 credits required for the BFA degree.
  5. The credits obtained for any course may not be used to satisfy the requirements of more than one program.
  6. Students may take a maximum of six ESL credits towards a 90- or 108-credit degree, and a maximum of 12 credits towards the 120-credit degree.

81.20.2     Residence Requirements

Students are subject to the university residence requirement (see §16.2.2) which states that of the 90 credits required for the BFA degree, a minimum of 45 credits must be taken at Concordia University. Combining both residence requirements implies that the full-time student must enrol for a minimum of two years of study at Concordia University.
To fulfill the residence requirements for a BFA degree with a concentration in:

  1. Ceramics, Fibres and Material Practices, Painting and Drawing, Print Media, Sculpture, or Studio Art: a minimum of 30 credits in Studio Art and six credits in Art History must be completed at Concordia.
  2. Art Education – Visual Arts, Art History, Art History and Studio Art, Art History and Film Studies, Computation Arts, Design, Film Animation, Film Production, Film Studies, Photography, Contemporary Dance, or Intermedia (Video, Performance and Electronic Arts): at least half of the concentration requirements must be completed at Concordia.
  3. Performance Creation, Acting for the Theatre, or Design for the Theatre: a minimum of 30 credits from the Department of Theatre must be completed at Concordia.
  4. Music, Electroacoustic Studies, Jazz Studies, Music Performance, or Music Composition: a minimum of 30 credits required from the Department of Music must be completed at Concordia.
  5. Minor programs: at least half of the required credits must be completed at Concordia.

81.20.3     Course Load

The normal course load for students enrolled in the Faculty of Fine Arts is 30 credits per year for all full-time students, and a maximum of 18 credits per year for part-time students.

  1. Full-time students may not register for more than 18 credits of their maximum 30 credits in any studio area in any given academic year. Part-time students may not register for more than 12 credits.
  2. Students may register for a maximum of six credits in which films are produced as a course requirement during any given academic year. See §81.60.2 for list of courses. Also, students are limited, during their degree program, to 18 credits in Film Production or 24 credits in Film Animation courses in which films are produced as a course requirement (§81.60.2).
  3. Students may register for a maximum of six credits in Theatre Production in any given academic year, up to a maximum of 18 credits in all.
  4. Students may register for a maximum of six credits in Music Private Study in any given academic year, up to a maximum of 12 credits in the Major in Music degree program, and 18 credits in a specialization in music degree program.
  5. Students may register for a maximum of nine credits in Independent Study courses in their degree program. In the case of disciplines not offering three-credit Independent Study courses, students may register for a maximum of two six-credit Independent Study courses in their degree program.

81.20.4     Academic Performance Requirements

The system used by the Faculty of Fine Arts to assess academic performance at the undergraduate level is based on the assessment grade point average (AGPA). See §16.3.10 for definition of AGPA.

Acceptable standing requires that a student obtain an AGPA of at least 2.00.
NOTE: Although a “C-” grade (1.70 grade points) is designated as satisfactory for an individual course in §16.1.11, an AGPA of 2.00 is required to remain in acceptable standing.

Conditional standing results when a student obtains an AGPA of less than 2.00, but at least 1.50. A student is not permitted to obtain two consecutive conditional standing assessments.
Students in conditional standing may not write supplemental examinations and will not be permitted to register for further study until their program has been approved by the appropriate advisor in their Faculty or department. They must obtain acceptable standing at the time of their next assessment.

Failed standing results when a student obtains an AGPA of less than 1.50, or conditional standing in two consecutive periods of assessment. Failed students may not write supplemental examinations. In order to continue in their program, failed students must apply for readmission through Student Academic Services. If readmitted, failed students will be placed on academic probation. In addition, there may be other conditions determined by the Faculty at the time of readmission. Decisions of the relevant authority in the Faculty are final. Failed students wishing to be admitted to another Faculty must apply through the Dean’s Office of the Faculty to which they wish to be admitted. Credits achieved at another institution while on failed standing may not be transferred to a program at Concordia University. These credits, however, may be used to determine a student’s potential for readmission. If 24 or more credits are successfully completed at another institution while on failed standing at Concordia, students will be required to submit a new application for program admission and not an application for readmission.

Graduation Requirements
Students must satisfy all course requirements, be in acceptable standing, and have a minimum final graduation GPA of 2.00.
Potential graduates who fail to meet the requirements of acceptable standing, but meet the requirements of conditional standing, will have the following options:

  1. register for an additional 12 credits and, at the next assessment, meet the requirements for acceptable standing;
    or
  2. register for fewer than 12 additional credits. In this case, standing will be determined on the basis that these extra credits constitute an extension of the last assessment period.

For both option a) and option b), the additional courses taken must be selected in consultation with the student’s department.


81.20.5     Lapsed Program

Students enrolled in a specialization or major program in the Faculty of Fine Arts who have not registered for a course for nine consecutive terms or more will have a lapsed notation entered on their student record. Lapsed students must meet with the appropriate advisor in order to resume their program and be made aware of possible program modifications. In some cases, students might be required to submit a new application.


81.30     INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES IN FINE ARTS

The following course is required for all Bachelor of/Baccalaureate in Fine Arts students. It is strongly recommended that students take this course in their first year.

FFAR 250             Keywords: Reading the Arts Across the Disciplines (6 credits)
This course offers students with first-year standing* in the Faculty of Fine Arts a broad introduction to ideas and aesthetics in the visual and performing arts in Canada. It focuses on key concepts shaping and shaped by artistic production and reception in all artistic disciplines. Students deepen their understanding of the cultural significance and the debate that occurs around keywords across the disciplines. Over the year, students extend their powers of reading, writing, and critical thinking in lectures and tutorials.
*Students with fewer than 30 credits completed in degree program.

The following courses are open to students outside the Faculty of Fine Arts. See the course notes regarding admission for students in Fine Arts programs.

FFAR 254             Introduction to Food Studies: We Are What We Eat (3 credits)
This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the cultural and social processes of food creation and consumption. Students make connections between various aspects of the food world and their own roles and responsibilities within the food system. Through an exploration, not only of things eaten, but also of food spaces and food-related activities — including design, studio arts, and architecture — students discover that interactions with food are not as matter-of-fact as often assumed.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 298 number may not take this course for credit.

FFAR 255             Art of Film Animation (3 credits)
This course introduces animation to students with little or no background in cinema or animation studies. Topics covered include major producers of animation; concepts, such as character development; and individual artists and genres, such as anime. Upon completion of this course students are able to discuss cartoonality and naturalism as they relate to both mainstream and independent animation.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 298 number may not take this course for credit.
NOTE: This course cannot be applied within a BFA degree or any Fine Arts specialization, major or minor program.

FFAR 256            Hip Hop: Past/Present/Future (3 credits)
This course examines the subculture of hip hop in its contemporary and historic forms. Students study hip hop as a political and social movement that formed in reaction to the status quo in the United States and manifests through practices such as rapping, breakdancing and graffiti. The course covers a variety of media and perspectives through class discussions, self-directed writing, and assigned readings, which are oriented to increase the students’ understanding of hip hop and its relationship to the changing nature of technology, corporate media, race relations and youth culture.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 398 number may not take this course for credit.
NOTE: This course may not be applied within a BFA degree or any Fine Arts specialization, major or minor program.

FFAR 257             History and Visual Culture of Gaming (3 credits)
This lecture course introduces students to digital games, their history and their relationship to contemporary art practices. Digital games are considered as a medium of play, social interaction and artistic expression. The course situates digital games in an (art) historical context in order to better understand concepts of play in a digital age and the relevance of games to current art practices, beginning with examples of earlier games and their role as material culture. Students then reconsider the roles played by the art, the artist and the player/gamer as they are situated at the intersection between art, play and technology. Class discussions address life in virtual spaces and the relationships of power, capital, gender, ethnicity and other identities to both games and contemporary digital media.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 298 number may not take this course for credit.

FFAR 258             History of 20th-Century Fashion (3 credits)
This course covers the history of fashion from pre-WWI through the end of the century with emphasis on Paris, London and later New York. Lectures cover important designers from each decade and other influences on fashion such as the impact of the economy, world wars and popular culture.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 298 number may not take this course for credit.
NOTE: This course cannot be applied within any Fine Arts specialization, major or minor program.

FFAR 259             Art Forms of Bollywood (3 credits)
This course focuses on one of the world’s most popular film genres, Bollywood, which began in the 1930s. Students study the theory, culture and historical development of film in Mumbai as well as the components of a Bollywood film — plot, music and dance, with special emphasis on the films’ songs. Screenings are part of the course.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 298 number may not take this course for credit.
NOTE: This course cannot be applied within any Fine Arts specialization, major or minor program.

FFAR 260             The Movie Soundtrack (3 credits)
This course focuses on the powerful auditory dimension of moving pictures. Since the late 1920s, a sophisticated discourse has been woven into the voice, sound effect and music recordings that accompany screen images, yet its presence and contribution is still largely unnoticed by the vast majority of viewers. Over the term, critical and listening skills are developed promoting a fuller appreciation and understanding of cinematic and televisual sound design, as well as teaching students how to use their ears as well as their eyes whenever the moving contents of a screen draw their attention.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 298 number may not take this course for credit.
NOTE: This course cannot be applied within any Fine Arts specialization, major or minor program.

FFAR 290             (also listed as INTE 270)
                              HIV/AIDS: Cultural, Social and Scientific Aspects of the Pandemic (6 credits)
An interdisciplinary survey of the major issues and challenges of the HIV pandemic. Such topics as the biology of the virus, therapeutic, clinical and epidemiological research developments, the social costs of sexual taboos and discrimination, and media and artistic representation by and of people with HIV are presented by faculty and visiting community experts. The epidemics in the Western hemisphere, Africa, Asia, and other regions are addressed. Learning is based on lectures, weekly tutorials, and community involvement.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for FFAR 390, INTE 270, INTE 390, or for this topic under an FFAR 398 or INTE 398 number, may not take this course for credit.

FFAR 291             HIV/AIDS: An Interdisciplinary Introduction to Scientific, Social and Cultural Aspects (3 credits)
This course is an interdisciplinary survey of the major issues and challenges of the AIDS pandemic, introducing students to a broadly based overview of its scientific, social and cultural impacts. It also examines the interaction of personal and experiential perspectives with collective values, beliefs and behaviours in response to the health crisis worldwide and locally. Students examine the history of the pandemic and responses to it by governments, medical authorities, businesses, religious and community groups, as well as artists and cultural producers. Readings and requirements are diverse in nature and it is possible to submit creative work as part of the course assignments.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for FFAR 290, 390, INTE 270, 390, or for this topic under a INTE 398, COMS 399, or SOCI 399 number, may not take this course for credit.

FFAR 298             Special Topics in Fine Arts (3 credits)
A course at the introductory level which provides an opportunity for the study of specialized aspects of Fine Arts.
NOTE:This course may not be applied within a BFA degree or any Fine Arts specialization, major, or minor program.

FFAR 299             Special Topics in Fine Arts (6 credits)
A course at the introductory level which provides an opportunity for the study of specialized aspects of Fine Arts.
NOTE:This course may not be applied within a BFA degree or any Fine Arts specialization, major, or minor program.

FFAR 398             Special Topics in Fine Arts (3 credits)
A course which provides an opportunity for the study of specialized aspects of Fine Arts.

FFAR 399             Special Topics in Fine Arts (6 credits)
A course which provides an opportunity for the study of specialized aspects of Fine Arts.


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES IN SEXUALITY

Coordinators
FRANCES SHAVER, PhD Université de Montréal; Associate Professor, Sociology and Anthropology
THOMAS WAUGH, PhD Columbia University; Professor and Concordia Research Chair, Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema

Coordinating Committee
RACHEL BERGER, PhD University of Cambridge; Assistant Professor, History
DANIELLE BOBKER, PhD Rutgers University; Assistant Professor, English
TAGNY DUFF, MFA PhD Concordia University; Associate Professor, Communication Studies
GILBERT ÉMOND, PhD Université du Québec à Montréal; Assistant Professor, Applied Human Sciences
MARCIE FRANK, PhD Johns Hopkins University; Professor, English
MARTIN FRENCH, PhD Queen’s University; Assistant Professor, Sociology and Anthropology
BRIAN GABRIAL, PhD University of Minnesota; Assistant Professor, Journalism
VINCE GRAZIANO, MA York University, MLIS McGill University; Associate Librarian, Concordia Libraries
WILSON CHACKO JACOB, PhD New York University; Assistant Professor, History
MARK LAFRANCE, PhD University of Oxford; Associate Professor, Sociology and Anthropology
EDWARD LITTLE, PhD University of Toronto; Professor, Theatre
KIMBERLY MANNING, PhD University of Washington; Associate Professor and Principal, Simone de Beauvoir Institute
SHANNON MCSHEFFREY, PhD University of Toronto; Professor, History
VIVIANE NAMASTE, PhD Université du Québec à Montréal; Associate Professor and Concordia Research Chair,
Simone de Beauvoir Institute
M. AYAZ NASEEM, PhD McGill University; Associate Professor, Education
JAMES G. PFAUS, PhD University of British Columbia; Professor, Psychology
JOHN POTVIN, PhD Queen’s University; Associate Professor, Art History
GENEVIÈVE RAIL, PhD University of Illinois; Professor, Simone de Beauvoir Institute
HILARY ROSE, PhD University of Georgia; Associate Professor, Applied Human Sciences
AMY SWIFFEN, PhD University of Alberta; Assistant Professor, Sociology and Anthropology
ANNE WHITELAW, PhD Concordia University; Associate Professor, Art History


Program

Students are responsible for fulfilling their particular degree requirements; hence, the following sequence must be read in conjunction with §81.20.
The superscript indicates credit value.

  27    Minor in Interdisciplinary Studies in Sexuality
  12    Chosen from FFAR 290/INTE 2706; FASS 291/INTE 2753, FASS 392/INTE 3923;
          SOCI 375/ANTH 3753*; FMST 3923
    9    Elective credits on sexuality and sexual orientation chosen in consultation with the program
          coordinator from periodic topics courses and other suitable courses identified in a given year,
          and from the following regular courses:
          AHSC 2533; ENGL 3933; FMST 3913*; RELI 3803; WSDB 3833.
    6    Chosen each year from courses in gender and women’s studies in consultation with the
          program coordinator from a list of available offerings within departments of the
          Faculties of Fine Arts and Arts and Science.
          *Prerequisites waived for students having completed six credits in the Minor in
          Interdisciplinary Studies in Sexuality.


Courses

FASS 291         (also listed as INTE 275)
                          Introduction to Sexuality Research (3 credits)
An interdisciplinary survey of approaches to research in sexuality within the humanities, the arts, and the social sciences. Basic concepts of sexual identity, values, conduct, representation, and politics are addressed through such topical concerns as pornography and censorship, and through the perennial dialogue between biological and socio-cultural models of sexuality. The relation between theories and research methods is discussed in the context of classical and current research and creative activity. The syllabus reflects the varying specializations of the instructors from year to year.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for INTE 275, INTE 391 or FASS 391 may not take this course for credit.

FASS 392         (also listed as INTE 392)
                          Queer Theory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits. An interdisciplinary survey of the basic post-1970 theories of sexual minorities and diversity, in their historical and cultural contexts. Authors from Michel Foucault to Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick are introduced, as well as the work of artists and performers from Derek Jarman to k.d. lang. The syllabus reflects the varying specializations of the instructors from year to year.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for INTE 392 may not take this course for credit.

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