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John Molson School of Business

Section 61

Please note that the current version of the Undergraduate Calendar is up to date as of February 2017.

61.10    JOHN MOLSON SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

Faculty

Interim Dean
STÉPHANE BRUTUS, PhD Bowling Green State University

Associate Deans
ANNE-MARIE CROTEAU, PhD Université Laval; Professional Graduate Programs and External Relations
GEORGE K. KANAAN, PhD University of Wisconsin-Madison; Academic and Student Affairs – Undergraduate Programs
THOMAS WALKER, PhD Washington State University; Research and Research Programs


Location

Sir George Williams Campus
MB Building, Room: 015-115
514-848-2424, ext. 2779


Mission Statement

“To provide an engaging learning and research environment that inspires us to go beyond the commonplace for the development of business and society.”

Approved by Faculty Council  •  May 2014


61.20    ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

The general requirements for admission to Concordia University are listed in §13.
Cegep Entrance — the 90-credit program
The prerequisites for the 90-credit program are as follows:

Subject*: Concordia Courses:
Calculus I MATH 209
Linear Algebra MATH 208
Micro, Macro Economics ECON 201, 203
Computer Literacy BTM 200

*NOTE: Equivalencies will be determined at the time of acceptance.

Students with a DEC will complete the 90-credit program. Students who have a complete DEC but are lacking one or more of the prerequisite courses may take them within the 90-credit program as elective credits during the first year of the program.

Mature Entry — the 108-credit program
In addition to the 90-credit program, Mature Entry students will be required to complete the following 18 credits:
       6      credits in MATH 208, 209
       6      credits in ECON 201, 203
       3      credits in BTM 200
       3      additional elective* credits
*These elective credits must be selected from outside the offerings of the John Molson School of Business.

Extended Credit Program — the 120-credit program
In addition to the 90-credit program, students in the Extended Credit Program will be required to complete the following 30 credits:
       6      credits in MATH 208, 209
       6      credits in ECON 201, 203
       3      credits BTM 200
       3      credits ENGL 210 or 212
     12      additional elective* credits
*These elective credits must be selected from outside the offerings of the John Molson School of Business.

NOTE: Because of the extensive use of computers in various programs, students are advised to have access to a personal computer.


61.21  Undergraduate Degree Programs

The John Molson School of Business offers two distinct undergraduate programs. The Bachelor of/Baccalaureate in Commerce (BComm) is a structured program in which the student will select a major from those offered by the School of Business. The Bachelor of/Baccalaureate in Administration (BAdmin) is a flexible program which permits the student to pursue interests outside the School of Business, and offers the possibility of complementing a fundamental grounding in Administration with minor concentrations in an area of interest. Degree requirements listed below apply to all students entering the program on or after June 1, 2001.


61.21.1      General Education Requirement

The John Molson School of Business is committed to the concept of General Education. Students graduating from the Business programs will have acquired the benefits of a general education through the 12 elective non-Business credits they are required to complete.


61.21.2      The Bachelor of/Baccalaureate in Commerce

The program provides the student with an education for careers in business. This is accomplished through an interdisciplinary curriculum that is intellectually challenging. The first year of the program provides knowledge of fundamental business concepts and operational skills that form the base for the core curriculum. The second year of the program builds on this foundation to provide a broad experience in all phases of business. The interdisciplinary nature of the program allows students to analyze, formulate, judge, and solve challenging business problems. The last year of the program provides students with an opportunity for in-depth study of a specific business discipline.
More specifically, by the end of their BComm studies, students will:

  1. apply the core concepts appropriately within each business discipline;
  2. analyze business situations and demonstrate critical and analytical thinking to solve problems and make decisions;
  3. demonstrate an understanding of global business issues and practices;
  4. communicate effectively, both orally and in writing;
  5. work effectively in teams;
  6. understand ethical issues involving business situations.

As part of the Bachelor of/Baccalaureate in Commerce program, students will select 12 credits of elective courses outside the offerings of the School. Those credits, which will meet the School’s General Education requirement, should be chosen in areas that complement the students’ overall university education.

Degree Requirements:
     42      credits from the core
     12      elective credits outside the School of Business
     24      credits to apply towards the major (see Note 1)
     12      elective credits chosen by the student (see Note 1)

NOTES:
1.    All students are required to declare a major. The Major in Human Resource Management requires completion of 30 credits. Consequently, the elective credits chosen by the student are reduced from 12 to 6 credits.
2.    Students may add a second major in another business field. A double major requires completion of 102 credits as follows: 42 credits from the core, 12 elective credits outside the School of Business, 24 credits to apply towards the first major, and 24 credits to apply towards the second major. A double major including the Major in Human Resource Management requires completion of 108 credits. Minors in the JMSB are not available with a double major.
3.    The School may impose quotas on some majors.


61.21.3      The Bachelor of/Baccalaureate in Administration

The aim of the BAdmin program is to develop capable problem-solvers and decision-makers. The program provides students with a fundamental grounding in administration through the same set of core courses available to BComm students. Furthermore, students have the opportunity to pursue a wide range of interest amongst the various courses offered by the University. BAdmin students are expected to achieve the same learning goals as BComm students by the end of their BAdmin studies.

Degree Requirements:
      42      credits from the core
      18      credits from within the School of Business and/or its disciplines
      30      elective credits chosen by the student, but outside the School of
                Business, 15 of these must be beyond the introductory level.

NOTE: For the BComm and BAdmin programs, a maximum of nine ESL credits may count toward the regular 90-credit degree, a maximum of 12 credits may count toward the 108-credit degree, and a maximum of 15 credits may count toward the 120-credit degree if the student is required to complete ESL courses. For students who are not required to complete ESL courses a maximum of six ESL credits may count towards their degree. Additional credits in ESL courses will be considered as credits completed above and beyond the degree requirements.


61.22  The Credit Core

The required 42-credit core is identical for both programs and comprises the following courses:

Courses at the 200 level
COMM 205  Business Communication
COMM 210  Contemporary Business Thinking
COMM 215  Business Statistics
COMM 217  Financial Accounting
COMM 220  Analysis of Markets
COMM 222  Organizational Behaviour and Theory
COMM 223  Marketing Management I
COMM 225  Production and Operations Management
COMM 226  Business Technology Management

Courses at the 300 level
COMM 305  Managerial Accounting
COMM 308  Introduction to Finance
COMM 315  Business Law and Ethics
COMM 320  Entrepreneurship

Course at the 400 level
COMM 401  Strategy and Competition

NOTE: Students are responsible for following the correct sequence of courses required for the completion of a particular program.


JOHN MOLSON SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

Program
Honours
Major
Minor
Certificate
         
Accountancy
  X
  X
Assurance, Fraud Prevention and
   Investigative Services
    X
 
Business Studies
    X1
X1
Business Technology Management
  X
X
 
Data Intelligence
    X
 
Economics
  X
X
 
Entrepreneurship
    X
 
Finance
X
X
X
 
Financial Reporting
    X
 
Foundations for Business
      X
Human Resource Management
  X
X
 
International Business
  X
X
 
Management
  X
X
 
Management Accounting
    X
 
Marketing
  X
X
 
Supply Chain Operations Management
  X
X
 


Students will indicate their preferred field of concentration at the time of application for entry. It should be noted that students may change their major and/or minor after completion of their first year of study.
1This program is not open to students registered in a program leading to the undergraduate degree of Commerce or Administration.
Students may transfer into the certificate program up to 12 credits earned in an incomplete degree or certificate program or as an Independent student, provided they are students in good standing. The credits that may be so transferred are determined by the University at the point of entry into the program.


61.22.1      Academic Performance Regulations

NOTE: The GPA regulations apply to all students, including those with Visiting status, registered in programs offered by the John Molson School of Business. This also includes the Minor in Business Studies and certificate programs.

The objectives of these regulations are:

  1. to ensure that the School of Business can certify that all of its graduates are qualified to enter their profession;
  2. to ensure that students can, with the assistance or intervention of the School of Business, assess themselves objectively, and plan programs of study designed to meet their individual needs.
     

Assessment Grade Point Average (AGPA)*
Requirements and Consequences
*See §16.3.10, II for definition of AGPA.
Acceptable standing requires that a student obtain an AGPA of at least 2.00.
NOTE: Although a “C-” grade (1.70 grade points) is designated as satisfactory in §16.1.11, an AGPA of 2.00 is required for acceptable standing.
Students in acceptable standing must repeat all courses in which failing grades were obtained provided that these courses are required for their program.

Conditional standing results when a student obtains an AGPA between 1.50 and 2.00. Students in conditional standing may not write supplemental examinations but may proceed subject to the following conditions:

  1. they must receive academic counselling from the appropriate member of the Dean’s Office;
  2. they must successfully repeat all courses in which failing grades were obtained provided that these courses are required for their program, or replace them by alternatives approved by the Dean’s Office;
  3. in no case will the number of credits exceed 15 per term for full-time students and six per term for part-time students;
  4. they must obtain acceptable standing at the time of their next assessment. If not, they are considered to be in failed standing.

Failed standing results when a student obtains an AGPA of less than 1.50, or fails to achieve acceptable standing after being on conditional standing at the last assessment.

  • Failed students are subject to the following regulations:
    1. They may not write supplemental examinations.
    2. They are dismissed from their program for a minimum period of one year.
  • Students who are in failed standing for a second time are dismissed from the University for a longer period of time.
  • In subsequent years, should failed students wish to return to university studies, they must contact the Office of the Associate Dean, Academic and Student Affairs, for information concerning conditions and procedures for seeking readmission.
  • Readmission is not automatic and is dependent upon an assessment of the applicant’s prospects for successful completion of the program. If readmitted, students will be placed on academic probation and restricted to a maximum of six credits per term. They must achieve acceptable standing at the time of their next assessment. Other conditions will be determined at the time of readmission.
  • Decisions of the relevant authority in the Faculty to which application is made are final.

Graduation Requirements
Students must satisfy all course requirements, be in acceptable standing, and have a minimum final graduation GPA of 2.00.
The standings of potential graduates who have attempted less than 12 credits since their last assessment are determined after adding the grade points obtained for these credits to those included in the computation of the GPA of the last assessment period.
Students who fail to meet acceptable standing but meet conditional standing will have the following options:

  1. register for 12 credits and meet the criteria for acceptable standing;
  2. register for fewer than 12 credits. In this case, standing will be determined after adding the grade points obtained for these credits to those included in the computation of the GPA of the last assessment period.

NOTE: Dean’s Office is to be understood as being the appropriate member of the Dean’s Office, normally the Associate Dean, Academic and Student Affairs, or delegate.


61.22.2      Registration Regulations

  1. Students in the John Molson School of Business who have a lapse in their program of study for six consecutive terms or more will not be allowed to continue in their program before meeting with an academic advisor.
  2. Students are allowed to register in a maximum of 12 credits during the summer session (including a maximum of six credits in any term within that session), except for students following the co-operative format of the program.

61.25  The co-operative education format

Co-operative Education is a model of experiential learning that bridges the academic program and the world of work. It provides students with the opportunity to combine study with paid work terms in their chosen fields, bringing a wealth of benefits to both students and their employers.

The co-op format is available in the following majors:

  • Accountancy
  • Business Technology Management
  • Finance
  • Human Resource Management
  • International Business
  • Marketing
  • Supply Chain Operations Management

The academic content is identical to that of the regular BComm program with three work terms interspersed with six study terms. However, in order to continue their studies in the co-operative format in the John Molson School of Business, or to graduate with a BComm degree as members of the Institute for Co-operative Education, students must satisfy the following conditions:

  • maintain an assessment grade point average (AGPA)* of at least 2.70 in their program;
  • be assigned a grade of pass or pass with distinction for each of the three work-term experiences;
  • remain in the designated work-study sequence. Any deviations must have prior approval by the Director of the Institute for Co-operative Education in consultation with the academic director of the student`s co-op program.

*The AGPA is calculated over all courses in the program in the manner described in §16.3.10.

Please refer to §24 of this Calendar for a full description of the co-operative format of the program.


61.30  GENERAL INFORMATION

Failures/Prerequisites
Students are cautioned that if they fail a course that is a prerequisite for a subsequent course, they should repeat and pass that failed course before registering in the subsequent course. For example, a student who fails COMM 217 in the fall term, and has registered in COMM 305 in the subsequent winter term, must drop COMM 305 and repeat COMM 217 in the winter term before registering in COMM 305 again.
Students who are not able to register in the failed course(s) should contact the undergraduate programs’ office during the course-change period at the beginning of each term.
Students who are registered for a course in which they do not have the appropriate prerequisite must adjust their registration accordingly. The Office of the Associate Dean reserves the right to deregister those students who do not adhere to academic regulations.

NOTE: THERE ARE NO SUPPLEMENTAL EXAMINATIONS IN THE JOHN MOLSON SCHOOL OF BUSINESS.

Proficiency in Canada’s Official Languages
The business community and governments have a preference for university graduates who are functional in both the English and French languages. All students are therefore advised to take advantage of the opportunities available to them at this University to ensure that they have good command of these two languages upon graduation.


61.35  JOHN MOLSON SCHOOL OF BUSINESS COURSES

COMM 205         Business Communication (3 credits)
Prerequisite: BTM 200 or INTE 290 previously or concurrently. This course focuses on the principles and techniques of clear, concise, and effective, written and oral communication, especially as they apply to business. The formal, grammatical, and stylistic elements of written and oral business communication are emphasized. In addition, students are instructed in and experience the use of audiovisual means of communication.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for COMM 212 may not take this course for credit.
NOTE: It is recommended that part-time students complete this course, along with COMM 210, as early in their program as possible.

COMM 210         Contemporary Business Thinking (3 credits)
Prerequisite: COMM 205 previously or concurrently; ECON 201 or 203 or equivalent previously or concurrently. This course presents a broad survey of the world of business and aims to incite students to develop a critical perspective on business literature. Students explore foundational business theories, by studying business articles and books, and evaluating the central ideas for scope, relevance, and managerial utility. The course also fosters students’ inclination to keep well informed about contemporary issues in organizations and business. Basic group work techniques and basic project management skills guide the students to complete group assignments.
NOTE: It is recommended that part-time students complete this course, along with COMM 205, as early in their program as possible.

COMM 215         Business Statistics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: MATH 208 or equivalent; MATH 209 or equivalent; BTM 200 or INTE 290 or COMP 248 previously or concurrently. This course introduces the fundamentals of statistics as applied to the various areas of business and administration. Topics covered include techniques of descriptive statistics, basic theory of probability and probability distributions, estimation and hypotheses testing, chi-square tests in contingency table analysis and for goodness-of-fit, and linear regression and correlation.

COMM 217         Financial Accounting (3 credits)
Prerequisite: COMM 210 previously or concurrently. This course examines the theory and prac­tice involved in measuring, reporting, and analyzing an organization’s financial information. Concepts underlying financial statements are discussed, with an emphasis on generally accept­ed accounting principles. Disclosures/requirements concerning financial statements as well as information needs of decision-makers are introduced.

COMM 220         Analysis of Markets (3 credits)
Prerequisite: COMM 210, 215; ECON 201 or equivalent; ECON 203 or equivalent previously or concurrently. This course provides a general per­spective on the history, operation and relation­ships between Canadian and international product, labour and financial markets. Specifically, students are introduced to issues of fundamental importance to today’s managers and entrepreneurs such as changes in structure and competitiveness in these markets in response to government policies, the determination and behaviour of interest rates, inflation, market integration, and the role and function of financial intermediation. It further provides students with the knowledge of the role and impact of regulation and other government interventions in these markets.

COMM 222         Organizational Behaviour and Theory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: COMM 205, 210. This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to study individual behaviour in formal organizations. Through theoretical case and experiential approaches, the focus of instruction progressively moves through individual, group and organizational levels of analysis. Topics in the course include perception, learning, personality, motivation, leadership, group behaviour, and organizational goals and structure.

COMM 223         Marketing Management I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: COMM 205, 210 previously or concurrently. This survey course introduces students to the key concepts in marketing. Topics covered include marketing strategy, buyer behaviour, and the impact of technology on the discipline. The course also explores the important role that marketing plays in advancing society.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for COMM 224 or MARK 201 may not take this course for credit.

COMM 225         Production and Operations Management (3 credits)
Prerequisite: COMM 205, 210, 215. This course is an introduction to contemporary operational issues and techniques in the manufacturing and service sectors. Among the topics covered are operations strategy, forecasting, materials’ management, total quality management, time-based competition, and minimal manufacturing. Mathematical modelling in resource allocation is also introduced. Cases and computer-aided quantitative tools for decision-making are used throughout the course with an emphasis on the interactions between production/operations management and other business disciplines.

COMM 226         Business Technology Management (3 credits)
Prerequisite: COMM 210 previously or concurrently. The objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the role of information technology in business organizations. Students learn how information technologies can be used to create business value, solve business problems, accomplish corporate goals and achieve and maintain a competitive advantage.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for COMM 301 may not take this course for credit.

COMM 299         Special Topics in Business (3 credits)
This course enables students to focus on a specific topic in business that is of interest to all students.

COMM 305         Managerial Accounting (3 credits)
Prerequisite: COMM 217. This course covers the development of accounting information to assist management in carrying out its functions effectively and efficiently. Concepts and techniques for planning, performance evaluation, control, and decision-making are introduced. New developments are addressed with a focus on contemporary business issues and real-world applicability of management accounting concepts and techniques.

COMM 308         Introduction to Finance (3 credits)
Prerequisite: COMM 217; COMM 220 previously or concurrently. This course provides a general understanding of the fundamental concepts of finance theory as they apply to the firm’s long-run and short-run financing, and investment decisions. Building on the objective of firm value maximization, students become familiar with the conceptual issues underlying risk and return relationships and their measurements, as well as the valuation of financial securities. They also learn the concept of cost of capital, its measurement, and the techniques of capital budgeting as practised by today’s managers. Students are introduced to the basic issues surrounding the firm’s short-term and long-term funding decisions and its ability to pay dividends.

COMM 315         Business Law and Ethics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: COMM 308. This course introduces students to important legal and ethical issues that they may encounter within a business organization. Through the study of laws, ethical principles and court judgments, students develop an understanding of legal and ethical issues, as well as the skills necessary to assist them in making sound legal and ethical decisions.

COMM 320         Entrepreneurship (3 credits)
Prerequisite: COMM 222, 223 or 224, 305, 308. This course introduces students to entrepreneurship. Students analyze and integrate entrepreneurship concepts into business development cases. They research, prepare, and present a comprehensive business plan that may involve commercial, technological and social innovations delivered through new projects by either new business ventures or existing firms. Since the business plan integrates aspects of accountancy, marketing, financing, human resources management, and operations management, students benefit from knowledge of entrepreneurship, regardless of their career goals. Project activities require teamwork, leadership and communication skills.

COMM 401         Strategy and Competition (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 45 business credits including COMM 225; COMM 226 or 301; COMM 315 and 320 previously or concurrently. This capstone course requires graduating students to demonstrate their ability to integrate the knowledge and skills they have acquired during their program. This course introduces the major models and theories in strategic management. Emphasis is on integrating concepts and methods for systematically assessing the external environment and internal company conditions that influence firm performance. Lecture topics and case studies are selected to portray the nature of the strategic process and the dynamics of competition in a variety of contexts. Additionally, the connection between organizational strategy and the physical environment is examined.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for COMM 310 may not take this course for credit.

COMM 499         Seminar Course (3 credits)
Prerequisite: To be determined each academic term. This course enables students, on an individual basis, to further focus on a specialized topic within their discipline.

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