Concordia University

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School of Community and Public Affairs

Section 31.540

Please note that the current version of the Undergraduate Calendar is up to date as of February 2017.

Principal
CHEDLY BELKHODJA, PhD Université de Bordeaux-Montesquieu; Professor

Vice-Principal
MARGUERITE MENDELL, PhD McGill University; Professor; Provost’s Distinction

Professor
DANIEL SALÉE, PhD Université de Montréal

Associate Professors
KARL HELE, PhD McGill University
ANNA KRUZYNSKI, PhD McGill University
LOUELLYN WHITE, PhD University of Arizona

Fellows
WILLIAM BUXTON, PhD Free University of Berlin; Professor, Communication Studies
MIKE GASHER, PhD Concordia University; Professor, Journalism
CHANTAL MAILLÉ, PhD Université du Québec à Montréal; Professor, Simone de Beauvoir Institute
ALAN E. NASH, PhD University of Cambridge; Professor, Geography, Planning and Environment
LORNA ROTH, PhD Concordia University; Professor, Communication Studies
FILIPPO SALVATORE, PhD Harvard University; Associate Professor, Classics, Modern Languages and Linguistics
MARK WATSON, PhD University of Alberta; Associate Professor, Sociology and Anthropology

For the complete list of faculty members, please consult the Department website.


Location

Sir George Williams Campus
Annex CI, Room: 101
514-848-2424, ext. 2575


Objectives

The School of Community and Public Affairs (SCPA) offers a multidisciplinary program in public policy analysis. The School prepares its graduates to be knowledgeable participants in the policy-making process in the private, public, and community sectors.
An innovative combination of academic and practical training exposes students to a wide range of public issues. In small classes encouraging participation, students develop specialized abilities to do research, to communicate, and to organize public consultations and debates. An internship program also enables students to gain the necessary experience of working in a public affairs job.
The School will be of interest to excellent students in a variety of disciplines, including economics, history, political science, sociology, urban studies, journalism, and communication studies. While some of our students enter the work force upon completion of their undergraduate degree, the majority continue their education. SCPA graduates tend to do graduate work either in their disciplines or, more often, in professionally oriented programs including public or business administration, international affairs, industrial relations, and law.
The historic Mackay Street building which the School occupies is an ideal site for small classes, public lectures, social events, and meetings. School facilities include a common room, a reading room and documentation centre, a seminar room, a computer room, and faculty and student offices.


Program

Students who enrol in the School of Community and Public Affairs must follow, in sequence, a three-stage program comprised of the following courses:

  42    BA Major in Community, Public Affairs and Policy Studies
          Stage I
  12    SCPA 2013, 2033, 2153; INTE 2963
    3    Chosen from SCPA 2043/POLI 2043 or SCPA 3393/POLI 3393
    3    Chosen from SCPA 2053/HIST 2053 or SCPA 2103/HIST 2103
          Stage II
  12    SCPA 3016, 3213, 3523
          Stage III
    9    SCPA 4113, 4123, 4503
    3    Chosen from SCPA 4603/COMS 4603; SCPA 4613/COMS 3613;
          SCPA 4653/COMS 4653
 
The Disciplinary Program
Students enrolled in the SCPA major program are strongly encouraged to combine the School’s major program with a departmental major, specialization, or honours program, and meet the Faculty of Arts and Science degree requirements.


Performance Requirements

Students are required to maintain an average of “B-” in program courses.

Entrance Requirements
Students admitted to the University and seeking to enter the School must have achieved a “B” average, or the equivalent at the previous educational level. Students wishing to enter the School will be interviewed personally and asked to complete a writing test. The interview process also serves to evaluate their language skills in both English and French. In exceptional circumstances, a candidate who has failed to meet the grade requirements might be admitted on the basis of a personal assessment of potential capacities.
For further information on curriculum, programs, personnel, and objectives, please call 514-848-2424, ext. 2579.


Courses

SCPA 201        Introduction to Public Policy and the Public Interest (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the theoretical, philosophical, and ethical foundations as well as the social logic of public policy formulation in modern societies. Using a multidisciplinary approach, it pays particular attention to the complex interaction between groups, individuals, and institutions in society, and brings students to consider issues related to the nature of the modern state, business-government relations, the labour movement, non-profit and community organizations, the influence of interest groups, media and international institutions on the policy agenda.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for SCPA 300 may not take this course for credit.

SCPA 203        Community and Public Affairs in Quebec and Canada (3 credits)
This course examines the interaction between civil society organizations and the state in the particular context of Quebec and Canada. It focuses on the labour movement, social movements and interest groups, and analyzes their role and influence in the policy-making process in Quebec and Canada, especially with regard to social policy, socio-economic development and human rights.
NOTE: This course is taught in French.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for SCPA 300 may not take this course for credit.

SCPA 204        (also listed as POLI 204)
                         Introduction to Canadian Politics (3 credits)
This course is a basic introduction to the fundamental issues of Canadian public life and the federal political system. It presents an overview of the constitution, institutions, political parties, electoral system, interest groups, and public opinion that represent the essential components of Canada’s political culture and government.
NOTE: Students required to take this course under Political Science as part of a major or specialization in that discipline must replace the credits with a course chosen in consultation with the SCPA advisor.

SCPA 205        (also listed as HIST 205)
                         History of Canada, Post-Confederation
(3 credits)
A survey of Canadian history from Confederation to the present, emphasizing readings and discussions on selected problems.
NOTE: Students required to take this course under History as part of a major or specialization in that discipline must replace the credits with a course chosen in consultation with the SCPA advisor.

SCPA 210        (also listed as HIST 210)
                         Quebec since Confederation
(3 credits)
A survey of the history of Quebec from the time of Confederation until the present. While due emphasis is placed on political developments in the province, the purpose of the course is to acquaint the student with the significant economic and social trends in modern Quebec.
NOTE: Students required to take this course under History as part of a major or specialization in that discipline must replace the credits with a course chosen in consultation with the SCPA advisor.

SCPA 215        Economics for Public Policy and Community Development (3 credits)
Based on an overview of current economic issues, this course introduces students to the fundamental analytical tools and concepts that are necessary to understand economic public policy and relevant to community development and empowerment.

SCPA 298        Selected Topics in Community and Public Affairs (3 credits)

SCPA 299        Selected Topics in Community and Public Affairs (6 credits)

Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

SCPA 301        Social Debates and Issues in Public Affairs and Public Policy (6 credits)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Stage I. This course emphasizes a deeper understanding of the process by which public policies are developed, implemented, and advocated, and of the role played by various institutions or groups in this process. Each year, a new set of key policy issues is selected for discussion and analysis. Students work in teams and are required to do case studies of institutions or groups relevant to the policy or public affairs issue they have chosen. The focus is on developing both communication skills, through oral and written presentations, and organizational skills as each team must organize one public panel discussion on one of the selected issues. The course takes place over the fall and winter terms.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for SCPA 401 may not take this course for credit.

SCPA 321        Public Affairs Strategies (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Stage I or permission of the School. This course examines and analyzes the ways in which corporate, public, and community organizations anticipate, monitor, and manage their relations with the social, political, and environmental forces which shape their operations and influence their action in their respective field. It familiarizes students with the strategies most often used in public affairs management, and develops the skills required for effective results.

SCPA 339        (also listed as POLI 339)
                         Quebec Politics and Society/La vie politique québécoise
(3 credits)
This course is a study of the changing party structure and political issues in Quebec and their relationship to constitutional, cultural, and economic factors.

On étudiera dans ce cours l’évolution structurelle des partis et des questions politiques au Québec en fonction de facteurs d’ordre constitutionnel, culturel et économique.

NOTE: Students required to take this course under Political Science as part of a major or specialization in that discipline must replace the credits with a course chosen in consultation with the SCPA advisor.
NOTE: The course will be offered in both English and French on a rotational basis. Please consult the Undergraduate Class Schedule for details.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for POLI 211, POLI 339 or SCPA 211 may not take this course for credit.

SCPA 352        Community and Local Activism (3 credits)
The goal of this course is to share, study, and debate dimensions of community and local activism. It critically examines traditions and histories of a variety of perspectives and presents current examples of local and community activism.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for ANTH 353 or SCPA 353 or SOCI 353, or for this topic under a SCPA 398 number, may not take this course for credit.

SCPA 398        Special Area Study in Community and Public Affairs (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Stage I. Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

SCPA 411        Internship (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Stages I and II. An essential part of the School’s program is a one-term apprenticeship in some aspect of community and public affairs. After completing 60 credits of the BA program, including Stages I and II, students are required to complete a practicum that will allow them to test their skills in a real situation. Placements may be drawn from all areas of possible employment, including the private sector, government and community service organizations. Students are expected to participate fully in finding and defining possible internships. Employers are asked to join in an evaluation of the work period. Students are required to submit a written report which summarizes and evaluates their work experience.

SCPA 412        Senior Research Seminar (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Stages I and II. In this course, students work in groups and are required to play out the position of a given corporate, public, or community organization in a simulation of real-life interaction between social and political actors over a particular policy issue. To this end, they must research and prepare all the necessary material (such as briefs, position papers, press kits) that will allow them to defend and make their policy position known. The actual simulation takes place in a one-day event at the end of the term.

SCPA 450        Neo-Liberal Globalization and the Global Justice Movement (3 credits)
This course, by examining global justice movements in the context of neo-liberal globalization, focuses on social movements, public policy and community.
NOTE: Student who have received credit for this topic under a SCPA 498 number may not take this course for credit.

SCPA 460        (also listed as COMS 460)
                         Political Communication (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Stages I and II. The relationships between media institutions and political institutions, both in Canada and internationally, are examined. Issues such as the flow of political information; the social and political construction of news; the politics of regulation; the politics of influence in campaigns, nation-building socialization through media; ideology in the media, and alternatives to traditional media are explored.
NOTE: Students required to take this course under Communication Studies as part of a major or specialization in that discipline must replace the credits with a course chosen in consultation with the SCPA advisor.

SCPA 461        (also listed as COMS 361)
                         Propaganda
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Stages I and II. The aim of this course is to recognize the orchestration of the elements of propaganda in media, and to develop the means to deal with it. Course methodology includes lectures, discussions, and projects.
NOTE: Students required to take this course under Communication Studies as part of a major or specialization in that discipline must replace the credits with a course chosen in consultation with the SCPA advisor.

SCPA 465        (also listed as COMS 465)
                         Rhetoric and Communication
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Stages I and II. This course focuses upon communication as persuasive or as producing identification. Emphasis is placed upon the role of communication in civic affairs. Classical and contemporary approaches to rhetorical theory and criticism are examined.
NOTE: Students required to take this course under Communication Studies as part of a major or specialization in that discipline must replace the credits with a course chosen in consultation with the SCPA advisor.

SCPA 498        Special Topics in Community, Public Affairs and Policy Studies (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Stages I and II. This course provides focused, in-depth examination and analysis of a particular policy topic, public affairs issue, or problem of community development. The subject of inquiry changes every year.


Program Objectives

FIRST PEOPLES STUDIES
The First Peoples Studies program is a major designed to introduce the student to the world of First Peoples (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis), specifically within the Quebec context. It investigates the history, the current situation, and the changing needs of First Peoples. Taught from First Peoples perspectives and based on sound, culturally sensitive research, the program’s aim is to bring accurate awareness and a better understanding of First Peoples issues, develop further understanding of society’s standing in relation to First Peoples, and build bridges towards mutual understanding between Quebec society and First Peoples. Students are encouraged, though not required, to take either a minor in another area of study, or a second major in order to facilitate the acquisition of complementary knowledge and practical skills relevant to contributing to the well-being and advancement of First Peoples.


Program

  45    BA Major in First Peoples Studies
          Stage I
  10    FPST 2013, 2023, 2033, 2971
    6    Chosen from FPST 2103, 2113, 2123, 2983
          Stage II
  13    FPST 3013, 3023, 3033, 3413, 3971
    6    Chosen from FPST 3063, 3103, 3113, 3123, 3203, 3213, 3223, 3233, 3983;
          RELI 3683; WSDB 3813
          Stage III
    7    FPST 4013, 4023, 4971
    3    Chosen from FPST 4063, 4103, 4113, 4123, 4133, 4143, 4153, 4903, 4913,
          4983; COMS 4193

  24    Minor in First Peoples Studies
  12    FPST 2013, 2023, 2033, 3013
    3    Chosen from FPST 2103, 2113, 2123
    3    Chosen from FPST 3103, 3113, 3123
    3    Chosen from FPST 3023, 3033, 3203, 3213, 3223, 3233
    3    Chosen from FPST 4013, 4023, 4113, 4123, 4133, 4143, 4153, 4903, 4913


Courses

FPST 201         Introduction to First Peoples Studies (3 credits)
This course introduces the guiding concepts central to First Peoples Studies at Concordia. These guiding concepts are often misunderstood by mainstream society. Themes include the Medicine Wheel as a structuring approach to course content and teaching/learning; worldviews; colonization and decolonization; First Peoples thought and knowledge; the diversity among First Peoples; and individual and community empowerment within First Peoples frames of reference. Principles and practices of dialogue and cross-cultural communication are introduced. A key process goal of the course is for students to explore, with increasing skill and knowledge, their own motivations, positioning, and goals in relation to pursuing First Peoples Studies.

FPST 202         Research Strategies in First Peoples Studies (3 credits)
This course introduces basic concepts, practices, and issues for study and research consistent with the goals of First Peoples Studies, including the historical relation of First Peoples to academic research; ethical considerations; the social construction of knowledge, the influence of First Peoples thought, knowledge, and ways of knowing on the development of relevant contemporary research; basic steps of designing, carrying out, and presenting research within several contemporary models, including participatory research; constructive relations of people of other cultures to researching in the area; qualitative and quantitative research methods, including asking research questions; and basic skills of interviewing, as well as treating, analyzing and presenting interview data, within qualitative research.

FPST 203         First Peoples of Canada (3 credits)
This course provides an introductory overview of knowledge related to the eleven cultural groups of First Peoples in Canada. It explores theories of migration, geographic location, cultural and linguistic diversity, historical socio-economic and political systems as well as the relationships with the environment and traditional practices and beliefs. In-depth focus is placed on representative nations within each group.

FPST 210         Haudenosaunee Peoples (3 credits)
This course traces the history of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) from the period of the founding of the Confederacy to the present. With particular focus on the Kanien’kehaka (Mohawk) of Quebec, it includes discussion on the culture, language, and structure of Haudenosaunee society, the formation of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, traditional philosophies such as the Kaienerekowa (Great Law of Peace) and the Code of Handsome Lake, Kanonsesro:non (people who adhere to the ways of the Longhouse), symbolism, as well as contemporary issues, including the impact of Euro-Canadian government policies.

FPST 211         Algonquian Peoples (3 credits)
This course explores the specific cultures of the Algonquian peoples of Canada with an emphasis on the peoples of Quebec (the Abenaki, the Algonquin, the Attikamek, the Cree, the Innu, the Malecite, the Mik’maq, and the Naskapi) and in particular the Eeyouch (the Cree Nations). From a historical perspective and using a sociological approach, this course examines social and political structures, gender-defined roles, relationship with the environment, as well as spirituality and language. This course also examines changing roles and structures influenced by colonization, including the imposition of federal policies.

FPST 212         Inuit Peoples (3 credits)
This course explores the specific cultures of the Inuit peoples in Canada with a particular emphasis on the Inuit people of Nunavik (Northern Quebec). The course examines social and political structures, gender-defined roles, the Arctic way of life, the Inuit language and its dialects, as well as the spiritual beliefs of the Inuit. This course also examines changing roles and structures influenced by colonization, including the imposition of federal policies.

FPST 297         Proseminar 1: Indigenous Ways of Knowing (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Registration in the program and permission of the School. This course examines how traditional knowledge continues to maintain relevance in the modern world. Students learn, both personally and professionally, how to work with, incorporate, and record indigenous knowledge.

FPST 298         Selected Topics in First Peoples Studies (3 credits)
Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

FPST 301         The Indian Act (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 201, 202. This course focuses on the Indian Act, with an emphasis on its impact on the First Peoples of Quebec. This includes discussion of the events leading up to its imposition, its implications for First Peoples cultures and societies, as well as related policies and other instruments of assimilation and colonization. Issues of accommodation and resistance are discussed. Effects of proposed changes to the Indian Act are analyzed and alternative solutions are explored.

FPST 302         First Peoples and Education (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 201, 202. This course traces the history of the education of the First Peoples. It explores current issues in education, including educational approaches defined and implemented by First Peoples. Topics covered include traditional ways of learning and teaching. The issue of colonization, including early attempts at religious and linguistic conversion, as well as Canada’s residential school system and its continuing legacy, are discussed in depth.

FPST 303         First Peoples and Health (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 201, 202. This course addresses First Peoples wellness philosophies and healing approaches in dealing with contemporary health problems. It draws significantly on historical perspectives of First Peoples mental, physical, spiritual, and emotional health issues, including pre-contact health and environments, the introduction of alcohol and viral disease, as well as the emergence of lifestyle-related diseases. Some of the current health issues to be explored include structural inequalities, institutional mistreatment, addictions, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, and mental health.

FPST 306         Contemporary First Peoples Art (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 201, 202. This course provides an in-depth examination of various artist traditions among First Peoples. Beginning in the post-World War II era, topics covered include historical and contemporary trends and influences in artistic production, biopics of prominent artists, and issues surrounding museum collection and arts patronage by settlers/non-autochtons. The lived experiences and realities of First Peoples will inform all topics examined in the course.

FPST 310         Linguistic Introduction to Algonquian Languages (3 credits)
This course presents a general overview of the eight Algonquian languages spoken in Quebec, with special emphasis on the Cree language. The course introduces the student to basic vocabulary, different dialects and writing systems. It explores the basic components that make up Algonquian languages, including sounds, word composition, sentence structure and meaning. Other topics include linguistic interference from dominant languages, semantic shift and the use of language as a social tool. This course assists the student to recognize and value the social and cultural context of language.

FPST 311         Linguistic Introduction to Haudenosaunee Languages (3 credits)
This course presents a general overview of the six Haudenosaunee (Iroquoian) languages, with special emphasis on Kanien’kehaka (the Mohawk language). The course introduces the student to basic vocabulary, different dialects and writing systems. It explores the basic components that make up Haudenosaunee languages including sounds, word composition, sentence structure and meaning. Other topics include linguistic interference from dominant languages. This course assists the student to recognize and value the social and cultural context of language.

FPST 312         Linguistic Introduction to Inuktitut Language (3 credits)
This course presents a general overview of the Inuktitut language, with special emphasis on the dialect spoken in Nunavik (Northern Quebec). The course introduces the student to basic vocabulary, different dialects, and the syllabic writing system used by Inuit people. It explores the basic components that make up Inuktitut, including sounds, word composition, sentence structure and meaning. Other topics include linguistic interference from dominant languages. This course assists the student to recognize and value the social and cultural context of language.

FPST 320         First Peoples and the Media (3 credits)
This course explores how First Peoples have been portrayed in selected media such as television, film, and advertising by looking at different representations in various industries such as advertising, sports, and tourism. This includes discussion on the relationship between media and First Peoples including the media’s impact on relations between the mainstream society and First Peoples. The social role of different forms of media as used by First Peoples in the process of empowerment is also discussed.

FPST 321         First Peoples and Justice (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 301. This course focuses on the relationship between First Peoples and the Canadian justice system. It looks specifically at how the Canadian legal, judicial, and penal system has dealt with First Peoples through time. The course also explores pre-contact forms of justice, tensions between European and indigenous conceptions of justice, First Peoples response to Canadian justice, and the emergence of alternative, indigenous mechanisms of judicial administration within communities in Quebec and Canada.

FPST 322         First Peoples and the Fur Trade (3 credits)
This course provides an in-depth historical and sociological analysis of the impact of the fur trade on the First Peoples of Canada. Topics include the emergence of the fur trade, and fur-trading companies’ dependence on First Peoples. Special emphasis is placed on changing demographics as a result of the fur trade, the increasing reliance on European goods, First Peoples entrepreneurial spirit, the birth of the Métis Nation, as well as the evolving political and economic role of women within fur-trading society.

FPST 323         First Peoples Sacred Stories (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 201 or 203. Through storytelling, reading, discussion, and writing, this course explores themes of fundamental human concern for First Peoples. It considers oral traditions as integral to broader, culturally defined systems of knowledge and explores the role of sacred stories in traditional and contemporary societies. This includes discussion on the role of stories as vehicles for encoding and transmitting knowledge about the people, the environment, the culture and history. Stories analyzed include creation stories, trickster tales, oral historical accounts, and stories relating to natural phenomena.

FPST 341         Globalization and Indigenous Peoples (3 credits)
This course explores the situation of First Peoples across the world from a comparative indigenous perspective. The primary aim of the course is to familiarize students with the similarities and differences between indigenous cultures and nations within the context of global colonialism past and present.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for ANTH/SOCI 303 may not take this course for credit.

FPST 397         Proseminar 2: Ethics and First Peoples (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Registration in the program and permission of the School. This course examines ethical issues pertaining to First Peoples from traditional and non-traditional perspectives. In addition to addressing community/research conflict and co-operation, concerns of insider/outsider research and cultural considerations in conducting research are also studied.

FPST 398         Special Topics in First Peoples Studies (3 credits)
Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

FPST 401         Contemporary Politics in First Peoples Communities (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 301. This course focuses on First Peoples politics in the Quebec and Canadian contexts. It explores more specifically the emergence and actions of First Peoples political organizations over the past 40 years, First Peoples relationships with successive federal and provincial governments, movements of national self-affirmation, and the nature of the political interface between competing groups inside First Peoples communities.

FPST 402         First Peoples Contemporary Social Issues (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 302, 303. This course addresses contemporary social issues and challenges faced by First Peoples. It analyzes the underlying causes of issues such as poverty, lack of formal education, isolation, alcohol and substance abuse, family violence and sexual abuse. The course also examines current healing approaches and programs used to deal with these issues, and fosters discussion on possible alternatives.

FPST 406         Decolonizing First Peoples Art (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 306. This course examines First Peoples artistic contributions within the context of decolonizing indigenous art globally. Topics explored highlight the relationship between culture, society, politics and visual art that illustrate art as part of the anticolonial resistance by First Peoples as well as the role of museums and exhibitions in fictioning national identities.

FPST 410         First Peoples Community Development (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 401 previously or concurrently. This course examines the concepts and experiences of community development among First Peoples, with an emphasis on Quebec. Selected community development models, their goals, processes, and means of evaluation, are analyzed. The course introduces students to analytical and practical skills in context-sensitive community development guided by First Peoples thought and knowledge. Students explore dynamics of nourishing community participation and leadership, as well as analyze community structures and inter-group relations within communities. Reference is made to on-reserve, urban, rural, and northern contexts. Ethical considerations are discussed. This course includes analysis of case studies.

FPST 411         First Peoples Treaties and Agreements (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 401 previously or concurrently. This course explores the contemporary issues associated with treaties and indigenous land claims agreements. Emphasis is placed on selected historically significant treaties between the First Peoples, and those between the First Peoples and the Europeans. The original intent and framework of treaties and agreements, the negotiation processes involved, and the implementation of treaties and modern agreements are also discussed.

FPST 412         First Peoples and Governance (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 401 previously or concurrently. This course examines the political and administrative mechanisms which First Peoples use to arbitrate competing interests, manage conflict, and formulate policies in their communities across Quebec and Canada. The course analyzes political and administrative institutions inherited from the Indian Act, as well as governance strategies developed in conformity with First Peoples traditions and in resistance to the Canadian state’s institutional dominion. The course also explores the tensions created by the coexistence of European and indigenous modes of governance within and outside First Peoples communities.

FPST 413         First Peoples International Relations and Diplomacy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 321. This course focuses on the actions and interventions of various First Peoples on the international scene, both in the past and in the present. The course’s primary aim is to explore the reasons why First Peoples have resorted to international forums and institutions, how they conduct their international action and whether in the end international diplomacy works to their advantage.

FPST 414         First Peoples Rights Movements (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 401 and 402, previously or concurrently. This course focuses on the many historical and contemporary forms of First Peoples resistance to colonization, including violent and non-violent resistance, revitalization movements and self-determination. It explores liberation theory and its roots in colonial oppression and analyzes historical and contemporary resistance movements such as the confrontation at Kanehsatake (Oka) and Esgenoopetitj (Burnt Church) and the movement for decolonization through self-determination.

FPST 415         Indigenous Identity and Nationalism (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 401 previously or concurrently. This course explores the political and ideological ramifications of the expression of indigenous identity. It focuses on the emergence of First Peoples nationalist movements, compares them with non-Aboriginal nationalisms, and examines the nature and conceptual foundations of the indigenous sense of nation. Attention is devoted to the political efficiency of indigenous nationalism in its interface with the Canadian and Quebec states. Case studies particularly emphasize Kanien’kehaka and Eeyou nationalisms.

FPST 490         Aboriginal Community Economic Development I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in the major; 60 credits and permission of the School. This course assists participants in exploring specific issues related to Aboriginal economic development in particular settings (in reserve, urban, rural, and northern communities), as well as addressing challenges common to Aboriginal CED. It assists participants in exploring historical and contemporary relationships between Aboriginal communities and the predominant cultural and economic forces, and comparing traditional Aboriginal organizational and economic practices with the new approaches being proposed by CED.

FPST 491         Aboriginal Community Economic Development II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: FPST 490. This course uses a case study approach to evaluate one or more economic development strategies applied within an Aboriginal community. An historical overview of this experience outlines the cultural and political context which has shaped these strategies as well as their results. CED approaches are examined in the context of this individual experience. This course may include on-site visits and guest lecturers.

FPST 497         Proseminar 3: Oral Traditions as Methodology (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Registration in the program and permission of the School. This course explores the validity and importance of oral traditions as a way to comprehend First Peoples knowledge and its continued relevance in the modern world.
 
FPST 498         Advanced Topics in First Peoples Studies (3 credits)
Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

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