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Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability

Section 31.525

Please note that the current version of the Undergraduate Calendar is up to date as of February 2017.

Principal
RAYMOND PAQUIN, DBA Boston University School of Management; Associate Professor, Management

Fellows
ADEELA ARSHAD-AYAZ, PhD McGill University; Assistant Professor, Education
MATTHEW BARKER, PhD University of Wisconsin-Madison; Assistant Professor, Philosophy
WILLIAM BUKOWSKI, PhD Michigan State University; Professor, Psychology
FRANK R. CHALK, PhD University of Wisconsin-Madison; Professor, History
JAMES GRANT, PhD University of Guelph; Professor, Biology
DAVID HOWES, PhD Université de Montréal; Professor, Sociology and Anthropology
SATOSHI IKEDA, PhD Michigan State University, PhD State University of New York at Binghamton;
Associate Professor, Sociology and Anthropology
PK LANGSHAW, MFA Université du Québec à Montréal; Professor, Design and Computation Arts
JAMES MOORE, MA University of Toronto; Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Political Science
ALAN E. NASH, PhD University of Cambridge; Professor, Geography, Planning and Environment
KATJA NEVES-GRAÇA, PhD York University; Associate Professor, Sociology and Anthropology
DANIEL SALÉE, PhD Université de Montréal; Professor, Political Science/School of Community and Public Affairs
ROSEMARIE SCHADE, DPhil University of York (U.K.)
PETER STOETT, PhD Queen’s University; Professor, Political Science

For the complete list of faculty members, please consult the Department website.


Location

Loyola Campus
Administration Building, Room: AD 502
Tel.: 514-848-2424, ext. 2125
Email: loyolacollege.fas@concordia.ca


Objectives

Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability is designed as a secular college that addresses the academic needs of selected undergraduate students who seek to balance discipline-based instruction with interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary communication in the arts and sciences. The educational philosophy of the College incorporates several objectives: to integrate international and global perspectives into higher education; to foster understanding of how the individual and society can operate more effectively in a global context of increased intercultural interaction; to develop a literacy of sustainability; to provide the practical tools needed to tackle the major issues facing humanity; to balance discipline-based instruction with interdisciplinary inquiry and cross-disciplinary communication; and to promote responsible citizenship and leadership in the 21st century.


Admission Requirements for Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability

Students may apply simultaneously to Concordia University and Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability by selecting “Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability” from the drop-down menu on the Program(s) tab of the Online Application. Further information about the College can be obtained by telephone, email, or by visiting the College’s offices.
All students registered in the Minor in Diversity and the Contemporary World and the Minor in Sustainability Studies are welcome to become members of the College if they successfully complete three LOYC courses. All other undergraduate students may also join the College if they successfully complete three LOYC courses.

Performance Requirement
Specific performance requirements are outlined for the Minor in Diversity and the Contemporary World and the Minor in Sustainability Studies.

Facilities
Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability is located on Concordia University’s Loyola Campus. The College has student study and lounge areas, a small library, and a conference room, to which all College members have access. The facilities are intended to complement Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability’s role as a community where students have the opportunity to pursue both their academic and extracurricular interests in a supportive and stimulating environment.


Programs

Students are responsible for satisfying their particular degree requirements.
The superscript indicates credit value.

  24    Minor in Diversity and the Contemporary World
  15    Chosen from LOYC 2103, 2203, 2303, 3103, 3203, 3303, 3403
    6    Chosen in consultation with a Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability advisor
    3    LOYC 4203
NOTE: The minor is designed for students to combine with an honours, specialization, or major in another discipline.
NOTE: Students must obtain a minimum grade of “B” in all courses counting towards their minor and/or membership in order to continue in the College.

  30    Minor in Sustainability Studies
    3    LOYC 2403
    6    BIOL 2053, LOYC 3203 to be taken in the first nine credits
    9    Chosen from BIOL 2263; CHEM 2093; EXCI 2333; GEOG 2033, 2043; LOYC 2203;
          PHIL 2363; SCPA 2153
  12    Chosen from BIOL 3533; COMS 3723; ECON 3913; GEOG 3213; HIST 3953;
          LOYC 3103, 3503, 4203; MANA 3693, 3743; POLI 3943
NOTE: Students are responsible for ensuring they have the necessary prerequisites for courses at the 300 level.
NOTE: Within the minor program, students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00 as well as a minimum assessment GPA of 3.00.
NOTE: Students registered in a Human Environment, Environmental Geography, or Environmental Science program may not take GEOG 203 or 204 for credit.

15-27   Foundation Year
       6   LOYC 2013, 2023
*9-21   ANTH 2723; CHEM 2093; HIST 2023; POLI 2053; RELI 2163; THEO 2333
*Students must obtain permission from the Principal of the Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability regarding course substitutions. Students who have received credit for these courses within their departmental program may not take these courses for credit toward their Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability Foundation Year.
NOTE: The foundation year is designed for students pursuing a 120-credit Extended Credit Program (ECP) in an undergraduate degree.


Courses

LOYC 201        The Idea of Modernity (3 credits)
The fundamental ideas and assumption of the modern Western world were formed in the 17th-century European Enlightenment. This course begins with an historical overview of the Enlightenment, followed by an interdisciplinary investigation of the idea of modernity. It focuses on the central modern concepts of a person, society, nature, and good and evil, and looks at some challenges to the idea of modernity. Finally, it explores current pressures that have led to the contemporary form of thought known as postmodernism.

LOYC 202        What is the Environment? (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to explore the broad set of interdependent phenomena that comprise the environments in which people live. These are: a) the natural environment of rocks, air, water, plants, and animals; b) the built environment including characteristics of cities, workplaces, and homes; and c) the cultural environment including the beliefs, attitudes, and institutions that affect how people perceive and behave in the environment.

LOYC 210        The 20th Century (3 credits)
This course provides select coverage of aspects of the historical forces and events that shaped the 20th century. The historical background of issues such as wars and peace, colonialism and postcolonialism, economics and the environment, and questions about ethnic and national diversity and cultural perception are explored. The course is intended to develop critical thinking together with basic bibliographic and writing skills.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HIST 283 or for this topic under a HIST 298 number may not take this course for credit.

LOYC 220        The Contemporary World (3 credits)
From a variety of perspectives, including historical, environmental, economic, and cultural, this course examines major issues facing the world today. These issues may include international trade and the economy, the regulation of garbage and pollution, the decline in cultural variability, the spread and control of disease, and the effects of mass communication. This course is intended to develop an appreciation of a global view of the challenges which the world is likely to face in the next few decades.

LOYC 230        Globalization and Diversity (3 credits)
This course explores the main differences between the world’s major cultures, religious beliefs, and philosophies, and addresses the tensions between establishing universal values and maintaining cultural diversity in an age of accelerating globalization. There is also an emphasis on the conception of different levels of social complexity, principally the role of the individual, the interpersonal, and the group within a society. This course is intended to develop team research and presentation skills, and the ability to communicate and work effectively within a small group setting.

LOYC 240        Global Environmental Issues and Ecological Justice (3 credits)
This course introduces students to collective action problems faced by governments, international organizations, corporations, advocacy groups, and scientists. Topics may include climate change, biodiversity conservation, hazardous waste disposal, water and food security.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for POLI 394 may not take this course for credit.

LOYC 298        Selected Topics in the Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability (3 credits)
Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

LOYC 310        Science and the Contemporary World (3 credits)
This course explores the basic issues of the philosophy of science by examining the nature of science as an activity and a way of understanding the world. Cultural variations in the philosophy of science are discussed as well as contemporary disputes involving the interpretation of science: Darwinism; the “Science Wars”; science and religion; and feminist critiques of science. This course is intended to develop critical thinking and analysis, and deductive and inductive reasoning.

LOYC 320        Biodiversity on Earth (3 credits)
The current state of biodiversity around the world and the forces that affect this diversity are the main focus of this course. It addresses the origins of this diversity, the advantages of variability in the environment for human life, and the contemporary challenges to this diversity. This course is intended to emphasize holistic thinking and system analysis.

LOYC 330        Self, Culture, and Development (3 credits)
This course examines, from a psychological perspective, how the concept of self varies across cultures. Whereas some cultures embrace the concept of the individual, other cultures emphasize the communal nature of social and personal existence. This theme is explored from several perspectives including theory about development, the treatment of “self” in literature, cultural variations in the concept of human rights, and the link between self and society. This course is intended to demonstrate the interface between the medical and social sciences and the analysis of change.

LOYC 340        Culture and Communication (3 credits)
This course is an anthropological approach to variations in cultural experience as they relate to communication. Students explore modes of expression and communication, including literature and film, with a view to examining questions of interpretation, aesthetics, and ethical judgment. Personal expression and communication are also discussed. This course is intended to develop an awareness of the role of imagination and creativity in expression and interpretation, and sensitivity to the role of cultural and other differences in processes of communication.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for LOYC 410 may not take this course for credit.

LOYC 350        Internship in Sustainability (3 credits)
This course offers students hands-on experience working on a sustainability-related project for approximately 120 hours. This internship course is designed to give students practical experience to complement other courses in the Minor in Sustainability Studies.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a LOYC 398 number may not take this course for credit.

LOYC 398        Selected Topics in the Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability (3 credits)
Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

LOYC 420        Integrative Project (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 12 credits of LOYC courses; or permission of the College. This course focuses on the conceptualization of cross-disciplinary inquiry and the intersections of theory and practice. In consultation with a College advisor, this course allows students to acquire the necessary skills to complete a high-level research paper or to complete and report on an internship in the community.

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