Concordia University

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Liberal Arts College

Section 31.520

Please note that the current version of the Undergraduate Calendar is up to date as of February 2017.

Principal and Permanent Fellow
ERIC BUZZETTI, PhD Boston College; Associate Professor

Permanent Fellows
JARRETT CARTY, PhD University of Notre Dame; Associate Professor
IVANA DJORDJEVIC, PhD McGill University; Associate Professor
GEOFFREY C. FIDLER, PhD McGill University; Associate Professor
ARIELA FREEDMAN, PhD New York University; Associate Professor and Vice-Principal
TOBIAS FOSTER GITTES, PhD Columbia University; Associate Professor
FREDERICK H. KRANTZ, PhD Cornell University; Professor
MARK RUSSELL, PhD University of Cambridge; Associate Professor
KATHARINE STREIP, PhD University of California, Berkeley; Associate Professor

For the complete list of faculty members, please consult the Department website.


Location

Sir George Williams Campus
Annex RR, Room: 103
514-848-2424, ext. 256


Objectives

The Liberal Arts College, a small community of fellows and students, provides a unique liberal arts emphasis within the Faculty of Arts and Science. Built on a core of eight courses, the multidisciplinary curriculum is designed to guide students in exploring the foundations and development of Western civilization and culture. The aim is to foster the major values of the Western tradition — those of critical thinking and respect for intellectual freedom.
The major goal of Liberal Arts College is to assist the student in the process of becoming an educated person. The College seeks to translate into modern idioms the traditional vision of education as a preparation for life. Its core courses and seminars, sharing a common concern with the changing nature of society and culture, aim at the development of an informed critical consciousness.
Emphasis is also placed on sharpening the basic expressive and analytic tools indispensable to social and cultural understanding. All College students are expected to present, or to acquire, a knowledge of a second language (normally, French), necessary for their research and to write and to express themselves clearly. Training in research techniques is stressed, and original, independent work encouraged.
Liberal Arts College, linking demanding general education to significant specialization, is committed to serious intellectual work. Through its curriculum, staff, standards, and academic environment, it hopes to communicate the excitement and creativity of such engagement to its students.


Liberal Arts College Admission and Program Requirements

Students admitted to the University and seeking to enter the College must have a “B” average from Cegep, or its equivalent. All students upon admission must demonstrate proficiency in English composition and a second language, or undertake necessary make-up work.* All applicants should apply through the Office of the Registrar; they should also call or write the College for an interview. Mature students are admitted to the College on the basis of an interview and an examination of their student record. Full-time degree candidates will normally complete their College core curriculum within three academic years; part-time degree candidates should complete their College core curriculum within six academic years. Students who have been admitted to the departmental honours program must maintain a “B+” average in their College core curriculum; all others must maintain a “C” average in their College core curriculum. All honours students in the College are expected to undertake significant original work, on a staff-guided basis, in their final year.
*Les étudiantes et étudiants francophones devront donner la preuve de leur connaissance de la langue anglaise.

Students seeking admission to the honours program may apply either for direct entry on the University application form or, once in the program, to the College’s honours advisor normally following the completion of 30 credits.

Staff
Permanent fellows are resident in the College, as is its Principal, who also teaches in the core curriculum.

Facilities
Liberal Arts College is located on Concordia University’s downtown Sir George Williams Campus. Its seminar and tutorial teaching is done in the same building that houses the College’s Principal and permanent fellows. The College has student study areas, a course-materials library, and audiovisual facilities, as well as common room and a collection of important newspapers, journals, and periodicals. The College, the focus of an extracurricular program of visiting speakers and cultural events, is a place where the exchange of ideas and views generated in courses and seminars continues on a more informal basis.

Counselling
Close student-faculty contact and exchange is part of the Liberal Arts College’s stress on serious intellectual work. Each student is assigned to a faculty fellow who acts as a personal advisor, and who follows the student’s progress through the College, advising on the choice of disciplinary or area specialization. All students’ work is evaluated annually by the Principal and fellows.

College Council
Council, composed of fellows and students, is the formal decision-making body of Liberal Arts College. It meets regularly, chaired by the Principal, as a forum in which current issues and future policy are discussed and decisions taken. Council is that body which ensures the democratic participation of all members of the College in its ongoing academic and extracurricular work.


Programs

All Liberal Arts College students must take the core curriculum. These interrelated courses constitute a significant segment of the coursework required for College-sponsored BA programs. Liberal Arts College stresses honours-level work, although a student may, with the permission of the College, combine the core curriculum with a departmental specialization or major program, or with the Individual Studies programs.

  42    Liberal Arts College — Core Curriculum
          Stage I
  18    LBCL 2916, 2926, 2956
          Stage II
  18    LBCL 3903 or 3923, 3916, 3936, 3943 or 3953
          Stage III
    6    LBCL 4906
 
In addition to completing the core curriculum, students must meet the Faculty of Arts and Science degree requirements and complete a departmental major, specialization, or honours program, or the Individual Studies program, or the Major in L.A.C. Western Society and Culture.
The core curriculum may also be applied towards specialization or honours work in the Individual Studies program. (See §31.170 of this Calendar).
All College students must consult with a College advisor before selecting courses in other disciplines or fields. Generally, courses in the Liberal Arts College are open only to members of the College.

Honours candidates must maintain a GPA of 3.30 (B+) in their College courses, with no grade lower than a “C.” Students in a major or specialization program must maintain a “C” average in their College courses, with no grade lower than a “D.”

  60    BA Honours in Western Society and Culture
          Stage I
  18    LBCL 2916, 2926, 2956
          Stage II
  18    LBCL 3903 or 3923, 3916, 3936, 3943 or 3953
          Stage III
  12    LBCL 4906, 4966
    6    Chosen from LBCL 4943, 4953, 4983
    6    Chosen in consultation with the honours advisor

  42    BA Major in Western Society and Culture
          Stage I
  18    LBCL 2916, 2926, 2956
          Stage II
  18    LBCL 3903 or 3923, 3916, 3936, 3943 or 3953
          Stage III
    6    LBCL 4906

  30    Minor in Western Society and Culture
          Stage I
  18    LBCL 2916, 2926, 2956
          Stage II
  12    LBCL 3916, 3936
The College advises students who are enrolled in the BA Major in Western Society and Culture to take, in addition, some form of concentrated study (e.g. major, minor) within a single department or field of study.

Further information on core courses and College programs generally may be obtained either by writing for the Liberal Arts College Informational Brochure or by calling the Liberal Arts College. Personal interviews with a fellow of Liberal Arts College may be arranged through the secretary.

Admission into a departmental honours program requires the approval of the Department.
Admission into the College’s honours program requires the approval of the College.

Students seeking admission to a departmental or College honours program will be bound by the honours requirements outlined in §16.2.4 of this Calendar.


Courses

LBCL 201        Great Books: Western History and Thought from Antiquity through
                         the Renaissance
(3 credits)
Social and political theory are central, and art, music, and scientific thought are represented. Key texts may include the Bible, Plato’s Republic, Thucydides’ Peloponnesian Wars, St. Augustine’s City of God, and Machiavelli’s Prince and Discourses.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for LBCL 291 or 292 may not take this course for credit.

LBCL 202        Great Books: Western Culture and Expression from Antiquity through
                         the Renaissance
(3 credits)
Literature, religion, and philosophy are central, and art and music are represented. Key texts may include Homer’s Odyssey, Virgil’s Aeneid, Montaigne’s Essays, and Shakespeare’s King Lear.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for LBCL 291 or 292 may not take this course for credit.

LBCL 203        Great Books: Western History and Thought from the Reformation
                         through Modernity
(3 credits)
Social and political theory are central, and art, music, and scientific thought are represented. Key texts may include Calvin’s Institutes, Descartes’ Discourses on Method, Hobbes’ Leviathan, and Mill’s Essay on Liberty.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for LBCL 291 or 292 may not take this course for credit.

LBCL 204        Great Books: Western Culture and Expression from the Reformation
                         through Modernity
(3 credits)
Literature, religion, and philosophy are central, and art and music are represented. Key texts may include Milton’s Paradise Lost, Rousseau’s Confessions, Stendhal’s The Red and the Black, and Nietzsche’s Genealogy of Morals.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for LBCL 291 or 292 may not take this course for credit.

LBCL 291        Structure and Dynamics of Western Civilization I (6 credits)
Prerequisite: Registration in the Liberal Arts College, or permission of the College. This course emphasizes the intellectual, cultural, and political traditions from the Biblical period and classical antiquity to the mid-17th century. Texts studied are related to changing social and historical contexts. Primary sources may include Genesis, Plato, Republic, Marcus Aurelius, Meditations, Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica, Machiavelli, Prince and Discourses, and Hobbes, Leviathan.

LBCL 292        Modes of Expression and Interpretation I (6 credits)
Prerequisite: Registration in the Liberal Arts College, or permission of the College. A study of major Western literary, religious, and philosophical traditions, involving the reading and interpretation of significant texts from antiquity to the mid-17th century. Emphasis is placed on development of writing skills and interpretative analysis. Primary texts may include Homer, Odyssey, Plato, Symposium, Augustine, Confessions, Dante, The Divine Comedy, and Cervantes, Don Quixote.

LBCL 295        History of Art (6 credits)
Prerequisite: Registration in the College, or permission of the College. This course is an integrated study of the nature of the visual arts from antiquity to the 20th century. Artistic expression is examined through chronological and thematic approaches, with attention to the relation between art and society.

LBCL 298        Liberal Arts College Selected Topics (3 credits)

LBCL 299        Liberal Arts College Selected Topics (6 credits)

Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

LBCL 390        History of Music: Ancient to Classical (3 credits)
Prerequisite: LBCL 291; LBCL 292; LBCL 295; or permission of the College. This course introduces developments in the history of European music from antiquity to the 18th century. Course content includes musical structure, period styles, and selected works by major composers, setting these within their historical contexts.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for LBCL 396 may not take this course for credit.

LBCL 391        Structure and Dynamics of Western Civilization II (6 credits)
Prerequisite: LBCL 291; LBCL 292; LBCL 295; or permission of the College. This course emphasizes the intellectual, cultural, and political traditions from the mid-17th century to 1914. Texts studied are related to changing social and historical contexts. Primary texts may include Spinoza, Theological Political Treatise, Locke, Second Treatise of Government, Rousseau, The Social Contract, Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Marx, Capital, and Nietzsche, Genealogy of Morals.

LBCL 392        History of Music: Classical to Contemporary (3 credits)
Prerequisite: LBCL 291; LBCL 292; LBCL 295; or permission of the College. This course introduces developments in the history of European music from the 18th century to the present day. Course content includes musical structure, period styles, and selected works by major composers, setting these within their historical contexts.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for LBCL 396 may not take this course for credit.

LBCL 393        Modes of Expression and Interpretation II (6 credits)
Prerequisite: LBCL 291; LBCL 292; LBCL 295; or permission of the College. A study of major Western literary, religious and philosophical traditions from the mid-17th century to 1914. Primary texts may include Stendhal, The Red and the Black, Diderot, Le neveu de Rameau, Goethe, Faust, Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, and Baudelaire, Les fleurs du mal.

LBCL 394        The History of Science: Antiquity to the Renaissance (3 credits)
Prerequisite: LBCL 291; LBCL 292; LBCL 295; or permission of the College. This course explores the history of science from antiquity to the Renaissance. Primary sources may include Aristotle, Physics, Plato, Timaeus, and Copernicus, On the Revolution of the Heavenly Spheres.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for LBCL 397 may not take this course for credit.

LBCL 395        The History of Science: Early Modern to Contemporary (3 credits)
Prerequisite: LBCL 291; LBCL 292; LBCL 295; or permission of the College. This course emphasizes the nature of modern science from the scientific revolution to the present day. Primary sources may include Darwin, Origin of the Species, Galileo, Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, Bacon, Advancement of Learning, and Einstein, Relativity.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for LBCL 397 may not take this course for credit.

LBCL 398        Liberal Arts College Selected Topics (3 credits)

LBCL 399        Liberal Arts College Selected Topics (6 credits)

Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

LBCL 490        The 20th Century: Forms, Themes, Critiques (6 credits)
Prerequisite: LBCL 391; LBCL 393; or permission of the College. This course emphasizes key issues in contemporary society and culture. Major 20th-century texts and documents — philosophical, literary, political, and artistic, as well as analytical materials drawn from history and the social sciences, are read. Primary sources may include de Beauvoir, The Second Sex, Woolf, To the Lighthouse, Levi, Survival in Auschwitz, Hayek, The Road to Serfdom, Heidegger, Being and Time, as well as theorists such as Foucault, Lévi-Strauss, Barthes, and Derrida.

LBCL 491        Integrative Seminar (6 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of the College. Students who have received credit for LBCL 490 may register for LBCL 491 provided the subject matter is different.

LBCL 494      Liberal Arts College Special Studies: Antiquity to Renaissance/Reformation (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of the College. This course addresses a selected field within the chronological period above, emphasizing focused study of specific primary texts, as well as significant works of interpretation as appropriate to the selected field. Themes normally vary on a year-to-year alternating basis, so as to reflect the broad orientations (Structures and Dynamics of Western Civilization, Modes of Expression and Interpretation) which inform the core curriculum.
 
LBCL 495        Liberal Arts College Special Studies: 17th Century to the Present (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of the College. This course addresses a selected field within the chronological period above, emphasizing focused study of specific primary texts, as well as significant works of interpretation as appropriate to the selected field. Themes normally vary on a year-to-year alternating basis, so as to reflect the broad orientations (Structures and Dynamics of Western Civilization, Modes of Expression and Interpretation) which inform the core curriculum.

LBCL 496      Liberal Arts College Honours Essay Seminar (6 credits)
Prerequisite: This course is open only to students at the College who have completed Stage II courses at the required academic level of performance. The student works with an individual faculty member in a chosen and approved area of the core curriculum, and must produce a sustained piece of written work approximately 40 pages in length. Students must also participate in an honours seminar in connection with their research and writing.

LBCL 498        Liberal Arts College Advanced Topics (3 credits)

LBCL 499        Liberal Arts College Advanced Topics (6 credits)

Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

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