Concordia University

https://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/undergraduate/calendar/current/sec31/31-240.html

Political Science

Section 31.240

Please note that the current version of the Undergraduate Calendar is up to date as of February 2018.

Faculty

Chair
ELIZABETH A. BLOODGOOD, PhD Princeton University; Associate Professor

Associate Chair
GRAHAM DODDS, PhD University of Pennsylvania; Associate Professor

Distinguished Professors Emeriti
HENRY HABIB, PhD McGill University
HORST HUTTER, PhD Stanford University
JAMES MOORE, MA University of Toronto

Professors
ANTOINE BILODEAU, PhD University of Toronto
HAROLD R. CHORNEY, PhD University of Toronto
BROOKE JEFFREY, PhD Carleton University
JAMES KELLY, PhD McGill University
GUY LACHAPELLE, PhD Northwestern University
PATRIK MARIER, PhD University of Pittsburgh
CSABA NIKOLENYI, PhD University of British Columbia
MABEN POIRIER, PhD McGill University
DANIEL SALÉE, PhD Université de Montréal

Associate Professors
CEREN BELGE, PhD University of Washington
TINA HILGERS, PhD York University
AXEL HUELSEMEYER, PhD University of Calgary
MEBS KANJI, PhD University of Calgary
EDWARD KING, PhD University of California, Berkeley
MICHAEL LIPSON, PhD University of Wisconsin-Madison
KIMBERLEY MANNING, PhD University of Washington
JEAN-FRANÇOIS MAYER, PhD Pennsylvania State University
STEPHANIE PATERSON, PhD Carleton University
AMY POTEETE, PhD Duke University
FRANCESCA SCALA, PhD Carleton University
LEANDER SCHNEIDER, PhD Columbia University
JULIAN SCHOFIELD, PhD Columbia University
TRAVIS SMITH, PhD Harvard University
MARLENE SOKOLON, PhD Northern Illinois University

Assistant Professors
NICOLE DE SILVA, PhD University of Oxford
SARAH GHABRIAL, PhD McGill University
MEGHAN JOY, PhD Ryerson University
MIREILLE PAQUET, PhD Université de Montréal

Senior Lecturer
RICHARD BISAILLON, PhD Concordia University

For the complete list of faculty members, please consult the Department website.


Location

Sir George Williams Campus
Hall Building, Room: H 1225-22
514-848-2424, ext. 2105


Department Objectives

The Department of Political Science offers a wide range of courses and programs to acquaint students with the living complexity of contemporary government and politics. The curriculum provides the theoretical foundations, analytical skills, and research methods for understanding the construction of government policy as well as the underlying nature and purpose of political processes and institutions. The aim is to prepare well-rounded, concerned citizens for careers in the public service and the private sector, or for graduate or law school.


Programs

The Department of Political Science offers the following programs of study: an honours, a major, and a minor.
Students seeking admission to the honours program may apply either for direct entry on the University application form or, once in the program, to the departmental honours advisor normally following the completion of 30 credits.
Students must apply to the departmental honours advisor for formal admission to either option of the honours program. Applications are due by May 15 for September admission and by November 15 for January admission. The number of places available in the Political Science Honours program is limited, and admission to the program is highly competitive. Students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.5 to be eligible to apply. If admitted, they must maintain an assessment GPA of at least 3.5 to graduate with honours. In order to maintain honours status, students must obtain approval for their programs from the honours advisor each year, prior to registration.
The program of courses leading to a Minor in Political Science consists of 24 credits in the Department. The minor is designed to provide an opportunity for students to make a combination with a specialization, a major, or honours in another discipline. A student’s minor will be arranged in consultation with the Department of Political Science so that it relates to courses in the major area of study.

Students are responsible for satisfying their particular degree requirements.
The superscript indicates credit value.

          Option A
  60    BA Honours in Political Science
  12    POLI 2033, 2043, 2053, 2063
    6    Chosen from POLI 3063, 3453, 3643, 3713, 3733, 3843
    6    Chosen from POLI 3903, 3923, 3933
  33    Chosen from at least three of the five groups in Political Science at the 300 or 400 level
          with a minimum of 12 credits at the 400 level
    3    POLI 4963 (Honours Seminar)

          Option B
  60    BA Honours (Thesis) in Political Science
  12    POLI 2033, 2043, 2053, 2063
    6    Chosen from POLI 3063, 3453, 3643, 3713, 3733, 3843
    6    Chosen from POLI 3903, 3923, 3933
    3    POLI 3963 (Honours Tutorial)
  24    Chosen from at least three of the five groups in Political Science at the 300 or 400 level
          with a minimum of nine credits at the 400 level
    6    POLI 4956 (Honours Thesis)
    3    POLI 4963 (Honours Seminar)

  42    BA Major in Political Science
  12    POLI 2033, 2043, 2053, 2063
  30    Chosen from at least three of the five groups in Political Science at the 300 or 400 level
          with at least six credits at the 400 level

  24    Minor in Political Science
  12    POLI 2033, 2043, 2053, 2063
  12    Chosen from courses in Political Science. A minimum of nine credits must be taken at
          the 300 or 400 level.

  24    Minor in Human Rights Studies
    6    PHIL 2413; POLI 2143
  18    Chosen from ENGL 3693, 3803, 3823, 3833, 3873; FPST 3213; GEOG 3053, 4073;
          HIST 3153, 3593, 4773; HIST 3603 or SOCI 3673; JOUR 4423; LOYC 2403 or
          POLI 2083; PHIL 2323, 3423, 3433, 3453; POLI 3013, 3243, 3283, 3883, 4073;
          POLI 3893 or THEO 3433; RELI 3103, 3123; SOCI 3803 or ANTH 3803; WSDB 3813,
          3853, 3863, 3903
NOTE: For details on the course descriptions in the program listed above, please refer to the individual departmental course listings.


Core Program

POLI 203  Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 credits)
POLI 204  Introduction to Canadian Politics (3 credits)
POLI 205  Introduction to International Relations (3 credits)
POLI 206  Introduction to Western Political Theory (3 credits)


Group 1: International Politics

POLI 301 
Social Movements and Protest Politics (3 credits)
POLI 302  Causes of War (3 credits)
POLI 303  Chinese Security Politics (3 credits)
POLI 304  Theories of Foreign Policy Making (3 credits)
POLI 305  International Political Economy (3 credits)
POLI 311  International Public Law (3 credits)
POLI 312  Special Topics in International Politics (3 credits)
POLI 315  International Organizations (3 credits)
POLI 318  Introduction to Strategic Studies (3 credits)
POLI 329  American Foreign Policy (3 credits)
POLI 332  Theories of International Relations (3 credits)
POLI 388  Human Rights and International Justice (3 credits)
POLI 391  Middle East and Global Conflict (3 credits)
POLI 394  Globalization and Sustainable Development (3 credits)
POLI 400  Advanced Seminar in International Relations Theory (3 credits)
POLI 402  Advanced International Political Economy (3 credits)
POLI 403  Global Ecopolitical Analysis (3 credits)
POLI 404  International Institutions (3 credits)
POLI 419  Strategic Studies (3 credits)
POLI 420  Politics of Conservation (3 credits)
POLI 421  Transnational Politics (3 credits)
POLI 422  Canadian Foreign Policy (3 credits)
POLI 423  Peace Studies and Global Governance (3 credits)
POLI 486  Advanced Seminar in International Relations (3 credits)


Group 2: Comparative Politics

POLI 301
  Social Movements and Protest Politics (3 credits)
POLI 307  The U.S. Presidency (3 credits)
POLI 308  Politics of Emerging Economies (3 credits)
POLI 310  Politics of the U.S. (3 credits)
POLI 313  Special Topics in Comparative Politics (3 credits)
POLI 319  European Politics and Government (3 credits)
POLI 320  Development of Western Legal Systems (3 credits)
POLI 322  Israeli Political System (3 credits)
POLI 323  Politics of Eastern Europe (3 credits)
POLI 327  Comparative Democratization (3 credits)
POLI 331  Comparative Party Systems (3 credits)
POLI 335  Politics of the People’s Republic of China (3 credits)
POLI 352  Comparative Urban Politics and Government (3 credits)
POLI 366  Politics of Africa (3 credits)
POLI 379  Politics of Latin America (3 credits)
POLI 395  Politics of the Middle East (3 credits)
POLI 405  Comparative Electoral Systems (3 credits)
POLI 406  Comparative Federalism and Political Integration (3 credits)
POLI 410  Environmental Policy in the Developing World (3 credits)
POLI 412  Comparative Social Policy (3 credits)
POLI 424  Corruption (3 credits)
POLI 429  Political Socialization in Canadian and Comparative Perspective (3 credits)
POLI 431  State-Society Relations in China (3 credits)
POLI 434  Politics of Violence in Latin America (3 credits)
POLI 435  Advanced Seminar in U.S. Politics (3 credits)
POLI 436  State and Society in the Middle East (3 credits)
POLI 437  Special Issues in African Development (3 credits)
POLI 438  Decentralization and Development (3 credits)
POLI 481  Advanced Seminar in European Politics (3 credits)
POLI 483  State and Society in Latin America (3 credits)
POLI 484  Post-Communist Democracies (3 credits)
POLI 485  Issues in Development and Democracy (3 credits)
POLI 487  Advanced Seminar in Comparative Politics (3 credits)


Group 3: Canadian and Quebec Politics

POLI 309
  Women and Politics in Canada (3 credits)
POLI 314  Special Topics in Canadian and Quebec Politics (3 credits)
POLI 321  Canadian and Quebec Law (3 credits)
POLI 324  Parliament and the Charter (3 credits)
POLI 334  Political Participation in Canada (3 credits)
POLI 339  Quebec Politics and Society/La vie politique québécoise (3 credits)
POLI 340  Canadian Political Culture (3 credits)
POLI 341  Provincial and Territorial Politics (3 credits)
POLI 351  Canadian Federalism (3 credits)
POLI 356  Canadian Political Parties (3 credits)
POLI 363  Issues in Canadian Public Policy (3 credits)
POLI 365  Canadian Public Administration (3 credits)
POLI 367  Quebec Public Administration (3 credits)
POLI 407  Parliamentary Bills of Rights (3 credits)
POLI 408  Public Opinion and Public Policy (3 credits)
POLI 409  Canada: State-Society Relations (3 credits)
POLI 428  Constitutional Politics in Canada (3 credits)
POLI 429  Political Socialization in Canadian and Comparative Perspective (3 credits)
POLI 488  Advanced Seminar in Canadian and Quebec Politics (3 credits)


Group 4: Public Policy and Administration

POLI 316  Special Topics in Public Policy and Administration (3 credits)
POLI 320  Development of Western Legal Systems (3 credits)
POLI 328  Public Policy and the Politics of Equality (3 credits)
POLI 330  Principles of Public Administration (3 credits)
POLI 349  Political and Social Theory and the City (3 credits)
POLI 352  Comparative Urban Politics and Government (3 credits)
POLI 353  Principles of Public Policy (3 credits)
POLI 361  Advocacy Groups and Public Policy (3 credits)
POLI 363  Issues in Canadian Public Policy (3 credits)
POLI 365  Canadian Public Administration (3 credits)
POLI 367  Quebec Public Administration (3 credits)
POLI 410  Environmental Policy in the Developing World (3 credits)
POLI 411  Gender and Public Policy (3 credits)
POLI 412  Comparative Social Policy (3 credits)
POLI 438  Decentralization and Development (3 credits)
POLI 463  Government and Business in Canada (3 credits)
POLI 489  Advanced Seminar in Public Policy and Administration (3 credits)


Group 5: Political Theory

POLI 306 
Classical Political Thought (3 credits)
POLI 317  Special Topics in Political Theory (3 credits)
POLI 345  Contemporary Political Philosophy (3 credits)
POLI 349  Political and Social Theory and the City (3 credits)
POLI 364  Hellenistic, Roman, Medieval Political Philosophy (3 credits)
POLI 368  Media, Technology and Politics (3 credits)
POLI 371  Early Modern Political Philosophy (3 credits)
POLI 373  Late Modern Political Philosophy (3 credits)
POLI 384  Principles of Political Theory (3 credits)
POLI 386  Contemporary Liberalism and Its Critics (3 credits)
POLI 389  Religion and Politics (3 credits)
POLI 401  American Political Thought (3 credits)
POLI 414  Authors of Political Imagination (3 credits)
POLI 415  Modern Political Theory and Religion (3 credits)
POLI 416  Ancient Political Texts (3 credits)
POLI 417  Governance (3 credits)
POLI 418  Machiavelli (3 credits)
POLI 425  Foundations of Liberalism (3 credits)
POLI 426  Nietzsche (3 credits)
POLI 427  Political Thought of the Enlightenment (3 credits)
POLI 433  Critics of Modernity (3 credits)
POLI 490  Advanced Seminar in Political Theory (3 credits)


Political Science Co-operative Program

Director
RICHARD BISAILLON, Senior Lecturer

The Political Science co-operative program is offered to all full-time students enrolled in the major and honours programs in the Department who meet the academic requirements for co-op. Students interested in applying for the Political Science co-op should refer to §24 where a full description of the admission requirements is provided.
Academic content is identical to that of the regular programs, with some specific recommendations for courses to improve the students’ job skills. While most of the positions will be in the Montreal area, students must be prepared to work in other parts of Canada.
Students are supervised personally and must meet the requirements specified by the Faculty of Arts and Science and the Institute for Co-operative Education in order to continue their studies in the co-op format.
Liaison between the student, the employers, and the Institute for Co-operative Education is provided by the Political Science co-op committee, which includes the student’s advisors.
Please refer to §24 for the schedule of study and work terms and the full description of admission requirements.


Courses

N.B.: Explanation of course numbers and the core program:

  1. Political Science Honours and Major students should normally complete the 12-credit core program in their first year of full-time equivalent studies. Mature Entry Program (MEP) and Extended Credit Program (ECP) students must consult an academic advisor regarding the completion of the 12-credit core.
  2. Courses at the 200 and 300 level are open to all students in other departments and Faculties.
  3. Courses at the 400 level are taught as seminars and are generally open to students enrolled in a Political Science program who have successfully completed 60 credits.


POLI 202          Introduction to Political Science (3 credits)
This course seeks to develop a broad basis from which to pursue further political inquiry. It offers an introductory examination of basic ideas regarding the state, power, authority, and systems of government. The course examines the diverse approaches to the specific study of political phenomena and provides a fundamental understanding of political concepts.

POLI 203          Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the main concepts of comparative political analysis. Major topics include different types of governmental systems and institutions, regime types, electoral systems and political parties, state-society relations, political economy, nationalism, democratization, globalization, and other types of political transformations. By examining several different countries, students gain an understanding of the great diversity of political life and the many ways in which politics affects citizens.

POLI 204          Introduction to Canadian Politics (3 credits)
This course is a basic introduction to the fundamental issues of Canadian public life and the federal political system. It presents an overview of the constitution, institutions, political parties, electoral system, interest groups, and public opinion that represent the essential components of Canada’s political culture and government.

POLI 205          Introduction to International Relations (3 credits)
This course introduces the principal theories, concepts, and debates in the contemporary study of international relations. It provides an overview of issues in international security, international political economy and global governance.

POLI 206          Introduction to Western Political Theory (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the study of Western political theory through a variety of primary source readings. Assigned texts may be drawn from philosophy, history, literature and other forms of political writing.

POLI 207          Introduction to Political Science Research (3 credits)
This course demonstrates how research is conducted in political science. Students learn how to develop a research design. The course introduces them to various research methodologies and provides several approaches for reporting and presenting research.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for POLI 392 or 393 may not take this course for credit.

POLI 208          (also listed as LOYC 240)
                         Global Environmental Issues and Ecological Justice (3 credits)
This course introduces students to collective action problems faced by governments, international organizations, corporations, advocacy groups, and scientists. Topics may include climate change, biodiversity conservation, hazardous waste disposal, water and food security.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for LOYC 240 or POLI 394, or for this topic under a POLI 298 number, may not take this course for credit.

POLI 209          Public Security and Terrorism (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of modern terrorism and its evolution, focusing on terrorist movements, groups, and incidents in many parts of the world over time. Students gain an understanding of the theory behind terrorism, its roots, goals, and ideologies, as well as its relation to governments, the media, and the public.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 298 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 214          Human Rights: An Overview (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the historical origins of the concept of human rights; the international regime and the acceptance of several generations of rights such as civil and political rights, economic rights, group rights, and women’s rights; the critiques of universalism and the problems of implementation of human rights.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 298 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 215          Global Politics (3 credits)
This course introduces students to several theoretical perspectives related to global politics, and then examines current events. The focus is on conflict resolution, the impact of globalization, the roles of international organizations, and information technology.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 298 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 216          Introduction to the United Nations (3 credits)
This course examines the operations and issues of the United Nations organization. It covers the operation of the Security Council and other components of the United Nations. It surveys micro-issues such as routine operations, the internal bureaucracy, the ethics of its procedures, and its historical background.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 298 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 217          Comparing Democracies (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the field of comparative politics by examining the institutional structures of established, advanced industrial democracies. Particular emphasis is placed on the study of constitutions; the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government; and electoral and party systems.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 298 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 219          Governance and Organized Crime (3 credits)
This course describes and defines organized crime, providing an overview of its history, different theories and models explaining it and the legal processes related to it. The course examines the role played by government agencies, such as the police and the bureaucracy, and the international bodies that combat it. Issues addressed in this course may include drug trafficking, racketeering, human trafficking, extortion, and economic crimes. A number of actual organized crime groups are analyzed.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 298 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 285          Introduction to Law and Society (3 credits)
This interdisciplinary course examines the roles law plays in society in Canada and internationally, from the perspectives of history, political science, anthropology, sociology, and philosophy.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for ANTH 285, HIST 285, or SOCI 285, or for this topic under an ANTH 298, HIST 298, POLI 298, or SOCI 298 number, may not take this course for credit.

POLI 298          Selected Topics in Political Science (3 credits)

Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

POLI 301          Social Movements and Protest Politics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or 205; or permission of the Department. This course examines the ideas, organization, and actions of such social movements as environmentalism, peace, human rights, labour, feminism, and antiglobalization. Theories of social movement mobilization, influence across national contexts, and the politics of protest are given particular attention.

POLI 302          Causes of War (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 205 or permission of the Department. This course examines the causes of war and peace in the international system. It studies the impact on war and peace of such influences as cognitive psychology, identity, group decision-making, bureaucratic processes, regime types, conflict spirals, arms control, arms races, balance of power, hegemonic stability theory, trade interdependence, environment and non-renewable resources, and international institutions.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 298 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 303          Chinese Security Politics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 205 or permission of the Department. This course examines the rise of China as a major power, and in particular the implications this has for military aspects of China’s relations. China’s security policy is examined from a theoretical, historical, political, and economic perspective, and the implications of these are examined in the cases of its foreign relations with neighbours and other great powers.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 313 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 304          Theories of Foreign Policy Making (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 205 or permission of the Department. This course explores the major international and domestic determinants of foreign policy. Principal topics include the influence on foreign policy of the international system, geography, leadership, regime-type, transnationalism, and non-governmental organizations. This course draws upon the experiences of a variety of Western democratic states.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for POLI 338 or for this topic under a POLI 398 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 305          International Political Economy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 205 or permission of the Department. This course examines institutions, processes, and issues in economic relations between states. Topics covered include theories of international political economy (IPE), international trade, global finance, multinational corporations, economic development, globalization, and regional blocs.

POLI 306          Classical Political Thought (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 206 or permission of the Department. This course focuses on the foundations of Western political thinking in ancient Greece. Through a careful examination of texts by Greek poets, historians and philosophers, concepts such as nature and convention, regime types, and justice and the good life are explored.

POLI 307          The U.S. Presidency (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or permission of the Department. This course provides a broad yet detailed introduction to the U.S. Presidency. Primary topics of study include the constitutional nature of the presidential office, how it has evolved over time, its place in American politics, its relationship with the rest of the federal government, its role in the policy-making process, and the relationship between individual presidents and the presidency as an institution.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 313 or 487 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 308          Politics of Emerging Economies (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or permission of the Department. This course examines the political and economic development of emerging countries. It addresses questions of autonomy/dependence on external powers, economic models, systems of government, and state-society relations, looking at historical and contemporary processes.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 313 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 309          Women and Politics in Canada (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 204 or permission of the Department. This course examines the role of women in Canadian politics at the federal, provincial, and local level. Historical, theoretical, and legal perspectives are examined and include the politics of racism; sexuality; community organizing; suffrage; and representation within formal political structures. It focuses on the diversity and development of the women’s movement in Canada.

POLI 310          Politics of the U.S. (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or permission of the Department. This course surveys the structures and dynamics that inform the contemporary American political process. In addition to studying the traditional governmental institutions, the course aims to provide a foundation for understanding and critically analyzing public opinion, the media and elections, federalism, political parties and interest groups, civil rights and civil liberties, and current issues in public policy.

POLI 311          International Public Law (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 205 or permission of the Department. This course explores the meaning, effectiveness, and potential of interstate law. Among the topics covered are the source and development of international law; the role of the International Court of Justice; sovereignty, territory, and natural resources; human rights violations, the state and war crimes tribunals; and international environmental law.

POLI 312          Special Topics in International Politics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 205 or permission of the Department. Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

POLI 313          Special Topics in Comparative Politics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or permission of the Department. Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

POLI 314          Special Topics in Canadian and Quebec Politics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 204 or permission of the Department. Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

POLI 315          International Organizations (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 205 or permission of the Department. This course offers an overview of international institutions and global governance. It examines major theoretical perspectives on international organizations, and addresses the role of the United Nations system, regional organizations, and non-governmental organizations in promoting international co-operation to address collective problems.

POLI 316          Special Topics in Public Policy and Administration (3 credits)
Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

POLI 317          Special Topics in Political Theory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 206 or permission of the Department. Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

POLI 318          Introduction to Strategic Studies (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 205 or permission of the Department. This course is an introductory examination of the theoretical aspects of strategic studies, including the principles of war, as they apply to combat on land, at sea, and in the air.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 398 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 319          European Politics and Government (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or permission of the Department. This course is a study of government and politics in selected European countries. It provides an analysis of political institutions, cultures, and processes.

POLI 320          Development of Western Legal Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or permission of the Department. This course is an overview of the major legal systems of the Western world, with special emphasis on the political decisions which influenced their growth and direction. Students study the development of Roman law, Romano-Germanic law, and English common law.

POLI 321          Canadian and Quebec Law (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 204 or permission of the Department. This course is an introduction to Canadian and Quebec law. Certain areas of criminal law, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and Quebec civil law are emphasized. An analysis is undertaken of criminal court structure and procedure, legal constitutional rights, and civil court structure and procedure.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for POLI 350 may not take this course for credit.

POLI 322          Israeli Political System (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or permission of the Department. This course introduces students to the study of the emergence and the operation of the Israeli political system and government. Topics may include the formation of the Israeli State; the legislative, the executive, political parties and the electoral process; ethnic divisions; gender and politics; and the issue of the Palestinian territories.
 
POLI 323          Politics of Eastern Europe (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or permission of the Department. This course studies the political process and institutions of the region, with a special focus on the recent transformation relating to economic problems, social structures, culture, and ethnic conflicts, as well as the role of governmental policies in domestic and foreign affairs.

POLI 324          Parliament and the Charter (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 204 or permission of the Department. This course examines the judicial and parliamentary responses to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Particular attention is paid to the judicialization of politics and the emerging dialogue on rights between courts and legislatures in important areas of public policy.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 398 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 327          Comparative Democratization (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or permission of the Department. This course discusses the nature of democracy and the challenges of democratization, drawing on experiences with democratization in Southern Europe, Latin America, Eastern Europe, and Africa. Students assess prospects for democratization and consider how other countries might encourage greater democracy in countries currently experiencing regime change.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 398 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 328          Public Policy and the Politics of Equality (3 credits)
This course reviews theoretical debates about the role of the state and the individual, collective and individual rights, integration, and the role of cultural diversity and identity. It examines selected policy demands of women, the poor, refugees, and other constituencies.

POLI 329          American Foreign Policy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 205 or permission of the Department. This course covers the sources and significance of American foreign policy, including the U.S. foreign policy-making process, the political and historical context of U.S. foreign policy decision making, and the nature and dimensions of contemporary American power. Major theoretical and policy debates are considered.

POLI 330          Principles of Public Administration (3 credits)
This course examines the theory and practice of public administration in Canada. The nature of accountability in public sector environments is reviewed in order to study how policy is developed, implemented, and evaluated by bureaucracies, central agencies, and the legislative branches of government.

POLI 331          Comparative Party Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or permission of the Department. This course introduces students to the academic study of political parties and party systems. It examines the determinants of party behaviour from a number of theoretical perspectives, including historical, sociological and institutional. The topics covered include, but are not limited to, the number of parties, electoral systems, party finance, leadership selection, and government formation and stability. Specific case studies are selected both from established and new democracies.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 398 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 332          Theories of International Relations (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 205 or permission of the Department. This course provides an introduction to international relations theory, covering the major debates between realism, liberalism, constructivism, and critical theory, as well as competing epistemological and methodological orientations.

POLI 334          Political Participation in Canada (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 204 or permission of the Department. This course examines the various approaches to understanding the participation of the public in politics, primarily electoral but also non-electoral activities, in Canada and from a comparative perspective.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 398 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 335          Politics of the People’s Republic of China (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or permission of the Department. This course focuses on the political development of the People’s Republic of China. Topics include political mobilization, economic development, nationalism, and the policy process.

POLI 339          (also listed as SCPA 339)
                          Quebec Politics and Society/La vie politique québécoise (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 204 or permission of the Department. This course is a study of the changing party structure and political issues in Quebec and their relationship to constitutional, cultural, and economic factors.

On étudiera dans ce cours l’évolution structurelle des partis et des questions politiques au Québec en fonction de facteurs d’ordre constitutionnel, culturel et économique.

NOTE: Students who have received credit for POLI 211, SCPA 211, or SCPA 339 may not take this course for credit.
NOTE: The course will be offered in both English and French on a rotational basis. Please consult the Undergraduate Class Schedule for details.

POLI 340          Canadian Political Culture (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 204 or permission of the Department. This course approaches Canadian politics from a societal perspective. The objective is to develop a better understanding of Canada’s political culture through a cross-time and cross-national analysis.

POLI 341          Provincial and Territorial Politics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 204 or permission of the Department. This course analyzes regional political cultures in Canada including the development of provincial political parties and public administrations, the rise of third parties, provincial and territorial constitutional positions, electoral behaviour, and institutional reform in the northern Territories.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for POLI 438 may not take this course for credit.

POLI 345          Contemporary Political Philosophy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 206 or permission of the Department. This course examines the character of contemporary political theory when viewed from both a modernist and an anti-modernist understanding of political life. The course also involves an examination into what it means to be modern and whether the critique of modernity is itself a very modern activity.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 398 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 349          Political and Social Theory and the City (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 206 or permission of the Department. This course examines the theoretical and ideological aspects of city government in historical and normative perspective.

POLI 351          Canadian Federalism (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 204 or permission of the Department. This course is a critical and analytical study of the theory of federalism, its principles, and techniques, and the response of Canadian federal systems to the demands of cultural dualism and regional pressures.

POLI 352          Comparative Urban Politics and Government (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or 204; or permission of the Department. This course deals with politics and government in selected Canadian cities, with comparative reference to cities elsewhere in the world.

POLI 353          Principles of Public Policy (3 credits)
This course examines the concepts, theories and approaches to the study of public policy. It also explores the major actors, processes and institutions involved in the development of public policy from a Canadian and/or comparative perspective. Topics include the role of the bureaucracy, globalization and internationalization, and state-society relations in policy-making.

POLI 356          Canadian Political Parties (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 204 or permission of the Department. This course provides a comprehensive examination of the origins and development of political parties in Canada at both the federal and provincial levels. Theories about party development, including one party dominance, brokerage politics and third party development, are examined in order to determine the efficacy of political parties.

POLI 361          Advocacy Groups and Public Policy (3 credits)
Students examine the broad social, economic, political, and cultural forces shaping governmental decisions and policies. Particular attention is paid to the conflict between private and public concerns.

POLI 363          Issues in Canadian Public Policy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 204 or permission of the Department. The course examines alternative public policies in selected areas at the federal, provincial, and municipal levels in Canada. Policies analyzed vary from year to year and include such areas as social welfare, culture, education, language, environmental protection, energy conservation, urban renewal, and economic policy.

POLI 364          Hellenistic, Roman, Medieval Political Philosophy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 206 or permission of the Department. This course examines the political teachings of the Hellenistic schools such as the Academics, the Stoics, the Epicureans and the Skeptics, the political writings from the Roman Republic and Empire, and the political problematics posed by early Christianity.

POLI 365          Canadian Public Administration (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 204 or permission of the Department. This course examines the organization and composition of the federal bureaucracy, the role of the bureaucracy in the making and implementation of public policy, patterns of recruitment, and the mechanisms of accountability and control.

POLI 366          Politics of Africa (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or permission of the Department. This course studies political institutions and processes in Africa from a comparative perspective. Countries and topics selected may vary from year to year.
NOTE: Students should consult the Department for current topic.

POLI 367          Quebec Public Administration (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 204 or permission of the Department. This course examines the organization and composition of Quebec bureaucracy, the role of civil servants and the making and implementation of public policy, patterns of recruitment, and the mechanisms of accountability and control.

POLI 368          Media, Technology and Politics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 206 or permission of the Department. This course examines the impact upon politics of changes in technology and the media. Students discuss a diverse range of contemporary thinkers and their understanding of the digital future. Particular attention is paid to the age of electronic politics and its effect upon the actual practice of political power.

POLI 371          Early Modern Political Philosophy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 206 or permission of the Department. Students are introduced to the origins of modern political thought from the Renaissance and the Reformation through to the mid-18th century.

POLI 373          Late Modern Political Philosophy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 206 or permission of the Department. This course examines the progression and criticism of modern political thought from the mid-18th century through to the early-20th century.

POLI 379          Politics of Latin America (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or permission of the Department. This course explores Latin American politics, economics, society, and culture from a multidimensional perspective. It emphasizes the common elements and diverging factors that characterize the contemporary evolution of Latin American countries.
NOTE: Students should consult the Department for current topic.

POLI 384          Principles of Political Theory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 206 or permission of the Department. This course is an intensive study of a basic work by a major thinker such as Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes or Hegel. It examines a major text such as Plato’s Laws or Hegel’s Phenomenology as well as commentaries on it, while attempting to explore systematically the issues and problems raised by the text and the interpretative traditions that follow from it.

POLI 386          Contemporary Liberalism and Its Critics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 206 or permission of the Department. This course examines recent developments in the theory and practice of liberalism, as well as criticisms of liberal principles and the liberal way of life from a range of contemporary perspectives.

POLI 388          Human Rights and International Justice (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 205 or permission of the Department. This course surveys normative questions comprising human rights discourse, with an emphasis on international efforts to promote human rights standards. Topics include the role of the United Nations, the North-South debate, environmental security, the obligation of individuals and states, women’s rights and the work of non-governmental organizations. Special consideration is given to the controversy between the universal and particular applications of human rights.

POLI 389          (also listed as THEO 343)
                          Religion and Politics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 206 or permission of the Department. This course studies the relationship between religion and politics with reference to historical, philosophical, theological and contemporary political thought.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for THEO 343 or for this topic under a POLI 398 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 390          Critical Perspectives on Modern Political Science (3 credits)
This course raises theoretical and practical questions regarding the limits, purposes, and presuppositions of modern political science through an examination of criticisms of and alternatives to prevailing modes of inquiry.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for POLI 372 may not take this course for credit.

POLI 391          Middle East and Global Conflict (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 205 or permission of the Department. This course is a study of the Middle East in transition, conflict and ideology in a global context of changing regional alliances. Topics include regional conflicts such as the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Iraq-Iran war, the Gulf crisis, foreign policy process, and the end of the cold war and its impact in the new millennium.

POLI 392          Approaches to Social Science Inquiry (3 credits)
This course introduces students to a variety of approaches to social scientific inquiry, focusing on their underlying logics. The course covers variable-based research of the qualitative and quantitative variety and alternatives to this approach such as critical theory, process-tracing, modelling, ethnography, interpretivist analysis, and conceptual analysis.

POLI 393          Quantitative Research Methods (3 credits)
In this course, students learn how to define, operationalize, and measure variables and how to statistically describe the relationship between variables with the help of statistical software.

POLI 394          Globalization and Sustainable Development (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 205 or permission of the Department. This course is an introduction to the emerging field of global environmental politics. It surveys the present environmental crisis and the roles of states, international organizations, and civil society. Various case studies dealing with oceans, forests, fisheries, biodiversity, global warming, and others are used to illustrate the inherent complexity of transnational ecological issues in the era of globalization.

POLI 395          Politics of the Middle East (3 credits)
Prerequisite: POLI 203 or permission of the Department. This course is a comparative study of politics and society in the modern Middle East and North Africa. Topics include the end of empires and the emergence of nation-states after World War I, political economy, regional conflicts, the question of democracy, the rise of religious movements, and the dynamics of revolutions and regime change.

POLI 396          Honours Tutorial (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in the Honours (Thesis Option B) in Political Science. This course requires students to conduct a literature review in a topic to be chosen for their thesis, complete a bibliography, and work on their methodological approaches.

POLI 400          Advanced Seminar in International Relations Theory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 205; or permission of the Department. This course addresses central questions of international relations theory, such as the causes of war, the paths to peace and co-operation, and the relationship between power and wealth. Students consider major paradigmatic approaches to these questions from realist, liberal and constructivist perspectives, as well as the utility of eclectic or cross-paradigmatic approaches.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 486 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 401          American Political Thought (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 206; or permission of the Department. This seminar examines texts articulating the theoretical foundations and historical development of the American regime, with attention to the relationship between the institutions, processes, individuals and ideas shaping the American way of life.

POLI 402          Advanced International Political Economy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 205; or permission of the Department. This course covers both the major theoretical approaches in International Political Economy (IPE) and the practical efforts of states to shape, control, and adapt to the international economic system. Students develop and continually practise the skills of logically coherent analysis, discussion, and presentation.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 486 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 403          Global Ecopolitical Analysis (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 205; or permission of the Department. This seminar course contextualizes contemporary ecological problems and global governance efforts to mitigate them. Students analyze multilateral environmental agreements in depth and explore various policy options that promise to anticipate future international ecopolitical issues.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 486 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 404          International Institutions (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 205; or permission of the Department. This course is an advanced seminar covering major theoretical perspectives on the significance in world politics of international institutions and regimes, and of inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 498 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 405          Comparative Electoral Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department. This course focuses on the various political and policy impacts that electoral laws have on party competition in both advanced industrialized and less developed democracies. The course introduces students to the detailed study of both the structure and the consequences of the main electoral systems.

POLI 406          Comparative Federalism and Political Integration (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department. This course begins by examining the theories of political integration, federalism and nationalism, and the various policy instruments available to the modern state to achieve integration, before moving to an analysis of the current situation in a range of modern federal states as well as the emerging confederal system of the European Union.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 498 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 407          Parliamentary Bills of Rights (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 204; or permission of the Department. This seminar explores the political origins and functioning of bills of rights in selected parliamentary democracies. Particular attention is paid to the “judicialization of politics” and the attempts to promote institutional dialogue between judicial and parliamentary actors in Westminister systems such as Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 488 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 408          Public Opinion and Public Policy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 204; or permission of the Department. By relying on examples from Quebec and Canada, this seminar focuses on the role of public opinion in shaping public policy. It offers an overview of scholarly debate and research on public opinion and political communication.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 498 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 409          Canada: State-Society Relations (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 204; or permission of the Department. The current research associated with the perception of a growing sense of democratic malaise and political discontent has prompted several academics to assess the current state of Canadian democracy. Students examine and discuss the current research and critically analyze the implications for Canada’s state-society relations.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 488 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 410          Environmental Policy in the Developing World (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203 or GEOG 300; or permission of the Department. This course surveys the interactions between development strategies and the environment. Topics may include the environmental ramifications of large development projects, different systems of property rights, decentralization, international debt, foreign aid, and the challenges associated with managing highly valuable natural resources.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 487 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 411          Gender and Public Policy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203 or 204; or permission of the Department. This course fosters an understanding of the theoretical and practical issues surrounding the study of gender and public policy and introduces them to recent scholarship in this area. Students examine a number of themes and debates, including gender and policy studies, gender and the welfare state, women’s groups in the policy process, and feminist perspectives on the bureaucracy.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 498 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 412          Comparative Social Policy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department. This seminar examines various explanations for the development and retrenchment of the welfare state in different countries. It analyzes typologies developed to conceptualize welfare-state regimes and examines, in a comparative fashion, key social policies such as health, pensions, and employment.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for POLI 461 may not take this course for credit.

POLI 414          Authors of Political Imagination (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 206; or permission of the Department. This seminar considers the political impact of contingent narrative approaches to shifts in an individual’s political imagination as opposed to purely rational or universally applicable philosophical arguments. The political potential of a broad range of literary styles, such as poetry, drama and the short story, is discussed alongside texts from the fields of philosophy, neuroscience and rhetoric so that their respective impacts can be assessed.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 490 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 415          Modern Political Theory and Religion (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 206; or permission of the Department. This seminar explores the use and abuse of religious ideas, texts and traditions in the theoretical foundations of modernity such as ethical priorities and orientations, political and social institutions, and the purposes and status of science, found at the core of modern life.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 490 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 416          Ancient Political Texts (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 206; or permission of the Department.This seminar explores, by careful reading of philosophic, poetic, or historical texts, the ancient political conceptualizations that frame and contribute to Western political ideas, issues and goals.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 490 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 417          Governance (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 206; or permission of the Department. This seminar investigates how the efforts of governments to control the lives, thoughts and thought processes of the members of society are central to the modern governmental process and how they have been part of the agenda since the beginning of the late modern era.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 490 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 418          Machiavelli (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 206; or permission of the Department. This seminar acquaints students with the arguments surrounding Machiavellian scholarship in particular and Renaissance political issues in general. Students study two of Machiavelli’s canonical texts (The Prince and The Discourses) in addition to his less well known but essential contribution to Florentine historiography (Florentine Histories). The political and literary context of Machiavelli’s writings, and how it colours contemporary criticism, is discussed.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 490 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 419          Strategic Studies (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 205; or permission of the Department. This seminar covers the theory and application of nuclear weapons as a means of deterrence to warfare. It surveys issues in nuclear control, missile defense, and deterrence design. Through simulations, special attention is given to contrasting theories on the utility of nuclear force.

POLI 420          Politics of Conservation (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 205; or permission of the Department. This course challenges students to analyze the complexities of wildlife conservation strategies at the local, national, and international levels. Students engage in teamwork and write individual papers on both specific endangered species and related concepts such as trade, development, corruption, conflict, public relations, and adaptive governance.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 486 or 498 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 421          Transnational Politics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 205; or permission of the Department. This seminar examines the activities of non-state actors, including NGOs, social movements, corporations, and individuals, and their roles in creating global society, building international institutions, and shaping foreign policy. Emphasis is placed on theories which seek to explain the relative influence of these actors in the international political system.

POLI 422          Canadian Foreign Policy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 205; or permission of the Department. This course examines Canada’s foreign policy. In this seminar, particular emphasis is given to the decision-making process by which foreign policy is formulated and implemented, with particular reference to Canadian relations vis-à-vis the United States, the Commonwealth, and the developing countries.

POLI 423          Peace Studies and Global Governance (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 205; or permission of the Department. This seminar focuses on the theory and practice of peace amongst nations. The course begins with a survey of analyses explaining the causes of aggression, war and peace, including theories of structural violence and revolution; nationalism and cosmopolitanism. It then examines the roles played by the state, international organizations, and peace movements, focusing on global and regional disarmament initiatives and peace-keeping.

POLI 424          Corruption (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department. This seminar deals with the corruption, patronage, and clientelism that characterize politics in much of the world. Case studies are used to explore the structures and processes leading to the use of informal channels and personal connections for doing politics.​
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 487 or 498 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 425          Foundations of Liberalism (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 206; or permission of the Department. This seminar examines the genesis, principles and purposes of classical liberalism as it is articulated by early modern authors. This involves investigating conceptions of and arguments for personal freedom, natural equality, private property, individual rights and limited government, among other topics. It then explores the subsequent development and distortion of liberal ideas by later theorists in the tradition.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 490 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 426          Nietzsche (3 credits)
Prerequisite: N.B. number (3) and POLI 206; or permission of the Department. This seminar is devoted to an exploration of the philosophical teaching of Friedrich Nietzsche and the subsequent influence of this teaching on the political and spiritual developments of Western culture. Nietzsche’s influence on such movements as deconstruction, nihilism, and postmodernism is explored.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 498 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 427          Political Thought of the Enlightenment (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 206; or permission of the Department. This course examines the impact of Enlighten-ment thinking in Europe, especially Scotland and the reformed parts of Northern France, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and the German states.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 498 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 428          Constitutional Politics in Canada (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 204; or permission of the Department. This seminar considers the emergence of “mega constitutional politics” in the 1960-1995 period involving state and societal actors. Topics include the Victoria Charter, Patriation, Meech Lake Accord, Charlottetown Accord, the 1980 and 1995 Quebec referenda, and attempts at non-constitutional reform since 1995.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 488 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 429          Political Socialization in Canadian and Comparative Perspective (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203 or 204; or permission of the Department. This course aims at understanding the social origins of political opinions, attitudes and values, under what conditions they change, and how they affect political dynamics in Canada and in a comparative perspective.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 487 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 431          State-Society Relations in China (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department. This course explores different approaches to the study of state-society relations in the People’s Republic of China. Specifically, the course considers the applicability of concepts such as neo-traditionalism, state reach, corporatism, civil society, and rightful resistance during both the Maoist and reform eras.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 487 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 433          Critics of Modernity (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B.number (3) and POLI 206; or permission of the Department. This seminar studies selected writings by major critics of modernity during the 20th century. The authors studied may include Hannah Arendt, Albert Camus, Fyodor Dostoevsky, George Grant, Bertrand de Jouvenel, Alasdair MacIntyre, Jacques Maritain, Richard Niebuhr, Michael Oakeshott, Leo Strauss, Charles Taylor, and Eric Voegelin.

POLI 434          Politics of Violence in Latin America (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department. This course provides an overview of Latin American history and development, beginning with conquest, through the lens of violence. Latin America is one of the most violent regions of the world. Gang wars, drug trafficking, kidnappings, and femicides are the regular fodder of the news media, but the class focuses on the structural violence — the marginalization and oppression of the poor masses inherent to local societies — that underlies the more spectacular forms of violence.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 487 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 435          Advanced Seminar in U.S. Politics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department. This course examines specific substantive or thematic topics in U.S. government and politics, such as the U.S. Congress and the legislative process, U.S. constitutional law, U.S. law and society, and American political development.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 487 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 436          State and Society in the Middle East (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department. This seminar explores patterns of authority and protest in the Middle East. The topics include the institutional and ideological sources of authoritarianism, the role of the military in politics, the tension between religion and secularism in the formation of national identities, and the various social movements, including religious and ethnic movements, that challenge prevailing structures of power.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 487 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 437          Special Issues in African Development (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department. This course surveys debates concerning development with a special focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Topics include the role of the state in development, the effect of African economies’ global connections, the activities of non-governmental organizations, and the effect of natural resources on development.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 487 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 438          Decentralization and Development (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department. This course introduces concepts related to the various forms of decentralization and explores the diverse expectations, politics, and outcomes associated with decentralization.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a POLI 487 or 498 number may not take this course for credit.

POLI 463          Government and Business in Canada (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 204; or permission of the Department. This seminar in public policy is designed to explore the relationship between government and business in Canada. Particular attention is paid to the formation and implementation of policy intended to promote and control enterprise, and the role of government as entrepreneur.

POLI 480          Workshops on Social Science Research (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3); or permission of the Department. Students must complete the permissions request form at concordia.ca/WSSR before registering for the course. Led by scholars, public officials, politicians, and policy analysts, these workshops are intensive short learning experiences designed to enhance students’ knowledge and skills in the areas of democratic governance, public policy, and research methodology.

POLI 481          Advanced Seminar in European Politics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department. This seminar examines the nature of politics of the states and societies of Western Europe, including the significance of their membership in the European Union.

POLI 483          State and Society in Latin America (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department. This seminar examines the nature of politics in Latin America. A specific focus is placed on selective issues of state-society relations, and the emergence of new political forces and institutions in response to changes in the socio-economic structure of the region.

POLI 484          Post-Communist Democracies (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department. This seminar reviews the post-communist states’ transition to democracy and their state-formation. The seminar focuses on the interplay between the forces of nationalism, ethnicity, identity, and the transition to democratic structures.

POLI 485          Issues in Development and Democracy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department. This seminar focuses on the political and economic problems of the new nations. A particular emphasis is placed on understanding the process of development and state formation within a democratic context.

POLI 486          Advanced Seminar in International Relations (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 205; or permission of the Department.

POLI 487          Advanced Seminar in Comparative Politics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203; or permission of the Department.

POLI 488          Advanced Seminar in Canadian and Quebec Politics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 204; or permission of the Department.

POLI 489          Advanced Seminar in Public Policy and Administration (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 203 or 204; or permission of the Department.

POLI 490          Advanced Seminar in Political Theory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and POLI 206; or permission of the Department.

Advanced seminars deal with selected topics in sub-fields of political science. Topics vary from year to year.
NOTE: Students should consult the Department for a description of these courses.

POLI 491          Directed Studies in Political Science (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (3) and permission of the undergraduate program director. This special reading course is designed in conjunction with a faculty member to explore topics and themes in a specific research area of interest to the student and faculty member.

POLI 495          Honours Thesis (6 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in the Honours (Thesis Option B) in Political Science. The student works with an individual faculty member in a particular field of study in Political Science. Students are asked to produce a sustained piece of written work to be defended before a departmental committee.

POLI 496          Honours Seminar (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of the Department. This seminar involves the student in formulating an honours research proposal, and the research and writing of an honours paper. Topics of the seminar vary from year to year.

POLI 497          Internship (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of the Department. The internship is a one-term apprenticeship in some aspect of public affairs and policy analysis. Placements may be drawn from all areas of possible employment, including private sector, government and community organizations. Students are asked to submit a written report which summarizes and evaluates their work experience.
NOTE: Eligible students should have completed 39 credits in Political Science and must have an excellent academic record with a minimum GPA of 3.5. The undergraduate committee of the Department will determine the eligibility of the student and will approve the internship. Students should consult the Department for further information.

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