Concordia University

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History

Section 31.160

Please note that the current version of the Undergraduate Calendar is up to date as of February 2017.

Faculty

Chair
PETER GOSSAGE, PhD Université du Québec à Montréal; Professor

Associate Chair
GAVIN TAYLOR, PhD College of William & Mary; Senior Lecturer

Distinguished Professors Emeriti
DONALD E. GINTER, PhD University of California, Berkeley
ROBERT TITTLER, PhD New York University
MARY VIPOND, PhD University of Toronto

Professors
GRAHAM CARR, PhD University of Maine
FRANK R. CHALK, PhD University of Wisconsin-Madison
STEVEN HIGH, PhD University of Ottawa; Provost’s Distinction
NORMAN INGRAM, PhD University of Edinburgh; Provost’s Distinction
SHANNON McSHEFFREY, PhD University of Toronto; Provost’s Distinction
ALISON ROWLEY, PhD Duke University
RONALD RUDIN, PhD York University; Provost’s Distinction

Associate Professors
RACHEL BERGER, PhD University of Cambridge
CAROLYN FICK, PhD Concordia University
ANDREW IVASKA, PhD University of Michigan
WILSON CHACKO JACOB, PhD New York University
NORA E. JAFFARY, PhD Columbia University
ERICA LEHRER, PhD University of Michigan
BARBARA LORENZKOWSKI, PhD University of Ottawa
TED McCORMICK, PhD Columbia University; Provost’s Distinction
MATTHEW PENNEY, PhD University of Auckland
ELENA RAZLOGOVA, PhD George Mason University
ERIC H. REITER, PhD University of Toronto, LLM McGill University
ANYA ZILBERSTEIN, PhD Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Associate Professor, James M. Stanford Professorship in Genocide and Human Rights Studies
MAX BERGHOLZ, PhD University of Toronto

Assistant Professor
THERESA VENTURA, PhD Columbia University

For the complete list of faculty members, please consult the Department website.


Location

Sir George Williams Campus
J.W. McConnell Building, Room: LB 1001
514-848-2424, ext. 2435


Department Objectives

It is the mission of the Department of History not only to train historians but to produce articulate and informed graduates who share its commitment to serving the broader community. The Department therefore encourages strength in both teaching and research, responsiveness to a wide range of intellectual perspectives, and involvement in community affairs.


Programs

Students are responsible for satisfying their particular degree requirements.
The superscript indicates credit value.

  60    BA Honours in History
Students seeking admission to the honours program may apply either for direct entry on the University application form or, once in the program, to the departmental honours advisor normally following the completion of 30 credits. Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.3 (B+). All students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.3 as well as a minimum assessment GPA of 3.3 within courses in History. The minimum acceptable grade in any course is normally “C.”

          A. Honours Essay Option
    6    Chosen from HIST 200-level courses with History Skills Workshops
          (courses denoted as HISW in the Undergraduate Class Schedule)
    3    History of Europe (HIST 2023, 2063, 2073, 2083, 2113, 2353)
    3    History of Asia or Africa (from among HIST 2423, 2613, 2623, 2633, 2643)
    3    History of the Americas (from among HIST 2033, 2053, 2093, 2103, 2513,
          2533, 2763, 2773)
    3    HIST 200-level courses
  15    HIST 300-level courses
    3    HIST 3043 (Tutorial Preparation for the Honours Essay)
    3    HIST 4023 (The Philosophy and Practice of History)
    3    HIST 4033 (Methodology and History)
    6    HIST 4936 (Honours Essay Tutorial)
  12    HIST 400-level seminars

          B. Seminar Option
    6    Chosen from HIST 200-level courses with History Skills Workshops
          (courses denoted as HISW in the Undergraduate Class Schedule)
    3    History of Europe (HIST 2023, 2063, 2073, 2083, 2113, 2353)
    3    History of Asia or Africa (from among HIST 2423, 2613, 2623, 2633, 2643)
    3    History of the Americas (from among HIST 2033, 2053, 2093, 2103, 2513,
          2533, 2763, 2773)
    3    HIST 200-level courses
  18    HIST 300-level courses
    3    HIST 4023 (The Philosophy and Practice of History)
    3    HIST 4033 (Methodology and History)
  18    HIST 400-level seminars

          C. Public History with Internship Option
    6    Chosen from HIST 200-level courses with History Skills Workshops
          (courses denoted as HISW in the Undergraduate Class Schedule)
    3    History of Europe (HIST 2023, 2063, 2073, 2083, 2113, 2353)
    3    History of Asia or Africa (from among HIST 2423, 2613, 2623, 2633, 2643)
    3    History of the Americas (from among HIST 2033, 2053, 2093, 2103, 2513,
          2533, 2763, 2773)
    3    HIST 200-level courses
    6    HIST 300-level courses
    3    HIST 300-level courses or elective credits from related disciplines
    3    HIST 3063
    6    Chosen from HIST 3793, 3803, 3813, 3873, 3883, 3893, 3973
    3    HIST 4023 (The Philosophy and Practice of History)
    3    HIST 4033 (Methodology and History)
    9    HIST 400-level seminars
    3    HIST 4813
    3    HIST 4853
    3    HIST 4863

  60    BA Specialization in History
    6    Chosen from HIST 200-level courses with History Skills Workshops
          (courses denoted as HISW in the Undergraduate Class Schedule)
    6    History of Europe (HIST 2023, 2063, 2073, 2083, 2113, 2353)
    6    History of Asia or Africa (from among HIST 2423, 2613, 2623, 2633, 2643)
    6    History of the Americas (from among HIST 2033, 2053, 2093, 2103, 2513,
          2533, 2763, 2773)
    3    HIST 200-level courses
  27    HIST 300-level courses
    6    Chosen from any HIST 300- or 400-level courses

  60    BA Joint Specialization in English and History
    6    ENGL 2613, 2623
    6    Periods before 1800 (British) from ENGL 3026, 3046 through 3283,
          4303 through 4413
    6    Canadian, American, and postcolonial from ENGL 2443, 3606 through 3883,
          4493 through 4553
    6    19th century and 20th century (British and European) from ENGL 3246,
          3296 through 3413, 3453, 3463, 3493 through 3593, 3943, 4423, 4433, 4463
    6    Chosen from HIST 200-level courses with History Skills Workshops
          (courses denoted as HISW in the Undergraduate Class Schedule)
    9    HIST 200-level courses
    9    HIST 300-level courses
    6    HIST 300- or 400-level courses

  42    BA Major in History
    6    Chosen from HIST 200-level courses with History Skills Workshops
          (courses denoted as HISW in the Undergraduate Class Schedule)
    3    History of Europe (HIST 2023, 2063, 2073, 2083, 2113, 2353)
    3    History of Asia or Africa (from among HIST 2423, 2613, 2623, 2633, 2643)
    3    History of the Americas (from among HIST 2033, 2053, 2093, 2103, 2513,
          2533, 2763, 2773)
    3    Chosen from any HIST 200-level courses
  18    Chosen from any HIST 300-level courses
    6    Chosen from any HIST 300- or 400-level courses

  24    Minor in History
    6    Chosen from HIST 200-level courses with History Skills Workshops
          (courses denoted as HISW in the Undergraduate Class Schedule)
  12    HIST 200 -level courses
    6    HIST 300-level courses

  24    Minor in Law and Society
    3    ANTH/HIST/POLI/SOCI 2853
    6    Chosen from ANTH 2023; HIST 2053; POLI 2043; SCPA 2043;
          SOCI 2613; students whose major program is in one of these units
          must draw from the other units
  15    Chosen from ANTH 3633, 3803; FPST 3013, 3213; HIST 3093, 3153,
          3603; PHIL 3433, 3453; POLI 3113, 3203, 3243, 3283, 3506, 3883;
          PSYC 2423; RELI 3123; SOCI 2623, 2633, 3623, 3633, 3673, 3803;
          of which no more than 3 credits may be at the 200 level; of which no
          more than 12 credits may be from one department.
NOTE: For details on the course descriptions in the program listed above, please refer to the individual departmental course listings.


Courses

N.B.:

  1. 300-level courses are generally open only to students who have successfully completed 24 credits. Students who do not have this prerequisite may register with the permission of the Department.
     
  2. 400-level courses are generally open to honours and specialization students, or students of high academic standing with the permission of the Department.


HIST 202          Modern Europe (3 credits)
A survey of the history of Europe from the French Revolution to the present, with emphasis on the development of ideas and political institutions.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 202 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 203          History of Canada, Pre-Confederation (3 credits)
A survey of Canadian history, from settlement to Confederation, emphasizing readings and discussions on selected problems.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 203 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 205          (also listed as SCPA 205)
                         History of Canada, Post-Confederation (3 credits)
A survey of Canadian history from Confederation to the present, emphasizing readings and discussions on selected problems.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 205 or SCPA 205 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 206          Medieval Europe (3 credits)
A survey of the history of Europe during the Middle Ages, from the fifth century to the 15th century, with consideration of political, social, economic, intellectual, and religious developments.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HIST 201 or HISW 206 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 207          Early Modern Europe (3 credits)
This course offers an introduction to European history from the 15th through the 18th centuries. It encompasses the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment. Other topics include European contact with the New World, the formation of commercial and colonial empires, the related transformation of economic and social relations in Europe, and arguably the first modern political revolutions.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HIST 201 or HISW 207 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 208          Introduction to the History of the Balkans (3 credits)
This course surveys the history of Europe through the Balkans (a region consisting of present-day Bulgaria, Romania, Macedonia, Albania, Greece, Montenegro, Kosovo/Kosova, Serbia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Croatia), from the pre-modern period to the present day. Emphasis is placed on the cultural diversity of the region and its impact on peace and conflict. Topics include the rise and fall of empires, economic change, religious transformation, violence, and the impact of ideologies such as nationalism, democracy, fascism, and communism.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 208 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 209          Quebec to 1867 (3 credits)
An introductory survey of the history of Quebec from its origins as a colony to the creation of modern Canada by the British North American Act of 1867. Particular emphasis is placed on a consideration of those elements of Quebec’s past which best assist in the comprehension of the trends prevalent in modern Quebec.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 209 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 210          (also listed as SCPA 210)
                         Quebec since Confederation (3 credits)
A survey of the history of Quebec from the time of Confederation until the present. While due emphasis is placed on political developments in the province, the purpose of the course is to acquaint the student with the significant economic and social trends in modern Quebec.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 210 or SCPA 210 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 211          (also listed as IRST 211)
                         History of Ireland (3 credits)
After establishing some broader historical context, this survey course traces modern Irish history in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Special attention is given to the development of Irish nationalism and relations with Great Britain.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for IRST 211 or for this topic under an IRST 298 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 212          (also listed as IRST 210)
                         The Irish in Canada (3 credits)
From 17th-century fishermen and traders arriving in Newfoundland to displaced victims of the Famine in the 19th century, to contemporary immigrants from Ireland, the Irish have had a presence in all parts of Canada from the earliest days of settlement. This course examines the emigration and settlement patterns of Irish immigrants in the various regions of Canada across a period of three centuries, paying particular attention to their role in the social, economic, political, cultural, and educational development of Canadian society. The course explores the various strategies by which Irish immigrants both adapted to and transformed the particular host society in which they found themselves, and looks at other immigrant communities as a means of understanding the special contribution of the Irish to Canada.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for IRST 210 or for this topic under a HIST or IRST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 213          (also listed as IRST 205)
                         The Irish in Montreal (3 credits)
Drawing on a diversity of historiographical materials, this interdisciplinary course examines the story of the Irish in Canada with a particular emphasis on Quebec, from the French colonial period through the City of Montreal’s golden era of mercantile prominence in the mid-19th century to the break-up of its older Irish neighbourhoods a century later. Starting with the demographics of Irish immigration and settlement, it devotes special attention to social and cultural relations between the Irish and other ethnic groups.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for IRST 205 or for this topic under a HIST or IRST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 219          (also listed as CLAS 230)
                         Ancient Near East (3 credits)
A political, social, economic, and intellectual history of the ancient Near East, this course surveys the period from the origins of civilization in the middle of the fourth millennium to Alexander the Great’s conquest of the Persian Empire in the latter part of the fourth century BC.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for CLAS 230 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 223          (also listed as CLAS 240)
                         Greek History from the Bronze Age to Alexander
(3 credits)
This course offers a political, social, economic, and cultural history of Greece from the Minoan-Mycenaean period in the second millennium to the end of Classical Greek civilization in the fourth century BC, with special emphasis placed upon Athens.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for CLAS 240 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 225          (also listed as CLAS 242)
                         History of the Roman Republic
(3 credits)
This course offers a political, social, economic and cultural history of Rome from the city’s origins to the establishment of the Roman Empire under the Emperor Augustus.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for CLAS 242 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 235          (also listed as RELI 235)
                         The Holocaust
(3 credits)
Beginning with a discussion of Jewish communities in Europe and America before 1933, this course traces the evolution of anti-Semitism, nationalism, and racism, the rise of Hitler and the Nazi movement, the shaping of Nazi ideology, the growing demonization of the victims of the Holocaust and the genocide against them in their various countries, resistance by the victims, and the parts played by bystanders in the outcome of the Holocaust.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 235, RELI 235 or 338 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 242          History of the Middle East (3 credits)
This course surveys the history of the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the present. It traces broadly the formation of an Islamic World over a millennium and follows its engagements with modernity, examining closely the shift from the overarching paradigm of the multi-ethnic/multilinguistic Ottoman Empire to that of the mono-ethnic/monolinguistic modern nation state. This course covers the political history of the region including the experience of British and French colonialism, the rise of nationalist movements, and the Arab-Israeli conflict, and focuses on its social, intellectual, and cultural history.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HIST 240, 241 or HISW 242 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 251          History of the United States to the Civil War Era (3 credits)
This course surveys American history from settlement to the Civil War Era. It deals with the political and economic framework of American history, and with social and cultural trends.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 251 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 253          History of the United States since the Civil War Era (3 credits)
This course surveys American history from the Civil War Era to the present. It deals with the political and economic framework of American history, and with social and cultural trends.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 253 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 261          History of South Asia (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the intellectual traditions, social structures, and political institutions of South Asia, with particular attention to developments during the past two centuries.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 261 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 262          History of China (3 credits)
A survey of China’s history from earliest times to the modern era.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 262 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 263          History of Japan (3 credits)
This course surveys Japan’s history from earliest times to the modern era. In addition to tracing political developments, it explores other themes such as the changing role of the samurai in history and the evolution of Japanese art, literature, and popular culture.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 263 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 264          History of Africa (3 credits)
This course is an introductory survey of the history of Africa. It examines the major phenomena of African historical experience, including the development of precolonial kingdoms and trans-Saharan trade, the slave trade, colonial conquests, the rise of nationalism, the challenges of independence, and recent crises such as the Rwandan genocide and HIV-AIDS. Emphasis is placed on popular cultural expression through which people on the continent have experienced, understood, remembered, and negotiated broad historical shifts.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 264 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 276          History of Latin America: The Colonial Period (3 credits)
This course surveys Latin America up to the wars of independence from Spain. The main themes examined are pre- and post-Columbian indigenous cultures; the Spanish conquest; patterns of colonial trade and economy; the role of the church; and the Bourbon reforms.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 276 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 277          History of Latin America: The Modern Period (3 credits)
This course surveys Latin American society in the 19th and 20th centuries. The principal topics covered are the social and economic roots of political instability; Mexico under Porfirio Díaz; the Mexican Revolution; Argentina and Brazil under Perón and Vargas; U.S.-Latin American relations; Castro’s Cuba; revolution and counter-revolution in contemporary Latin America.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 277 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 281          Film in History (3 credits)
This course examines how selected commercial films interpret historical events or provide insight into the politics, society, and culture of the times in which they were produced. The course is designed to help develop critical skills for the understanding of film in an historical framework.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 281 or this topic under a HIST 298 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 283          The 20th Century: A Global History (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the history of some of the forces and institutions that have shaped the history of the world in the 20th century, which has been characterized by widespread warfare, genocides, and massive violations against human rights and the natural environment. It has also been a time of unprecedented prosperity of some groups and parts of the globe, as well as an era of tremendous scientific advances.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HISW 283, LOYC 210, or for this topic under a HIST 298 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 285          Introduction to Law and Society (3 credits)
This interdisciplinary course examines the roles law plays in Canada and internationally, from the perspectives of history, political science, anthropology, sociology, and philosophy.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for ANTH 285, POLI 285, or SOCI 285, or for this topic under an ANTH 298, HIST 298, POLI 298, or SOCI 298 number, may not take this course for credit.

HIST 298          Selected Topics in History (3 credits)
Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

HIST 301          Late-19th-Century Canada (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines the politics of confederation and explores the social, economic, and cultural impact of modernization.

HIST 302          Natives and Newcomers (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines the interaction of European colonists with the first peoples of eastern North America before 1800. The emphasis is on cultural exchanges between colonists and Natives in the areas of religion, trade, diplomacy, and warfare.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 303          Native North American History Since 1800 (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines the history of Native North Americans, focusing on the period since 1800. Topics include the emergence of the reserve system and the policy of forced assimilation devised by the governments of Canada and the United States, and the political resurgence and cultural renaissance of Native communities since the mid-20th century.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 304          Tutorial Preparation for the Honours Essay (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Approved honours standing in History, or permission of the Department. This course provides honours students in History with the opportunity for tutorial reading and research in preparation for the writing of the honours essay.

HIST 305          Race and Gender in Canadian History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines the lives and experiences of Canadian women and men marginalized because of their race, gender and/or sexuality. By looking at people on the margins, this course explores the intersections of gender, race, and space, and speaks to two key issues of today: equality and justice.

HIST 306          History and the Public (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course is an examination of the practice of history outside the academy and an introduction to the critical analysis of presentations of history in public and popular culture. Topics include archives, corporate and popular history, museums and historic sites, preservation, film and television, theme parks, and anniversary commemorations. A special emphasis is placed on public controversies and ethical dilemmas involving historical interpretations.

HIST 307          History of Montreal (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). A study of the origins of the city, its role in the Empire of the St. Lawrence, and its rise to metropolitan dominance in Canada. Special emphasis on economic devel­opment and on ethnic groupings.

HIST 308          Cultures in Contact: A History of Migrations to North America (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course traces the journeys of men, women, and children who left their homelands and came to North America in search of economic opportunities and political and religious freedoms. Focusing on the 19th- and 20th-century waves of migration, students examine the communities migrants created, the discrimination they faced, and the manifold ways in which they, in turn, changed their host societies.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 309          Law and Society in Canadian History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines selected issues in Canadian history through the lens of important and controversial court decisions. The influence of legal decisions on society as well as public influence on the development of law is considered.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 310          Canada in the Early-20th Century, 1896–1939 (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). An intensive study of early-20th-century Canada concentrating on selected themes in economic, political, social, and cultural history.

HIST 311          Contemporary Canada, 1939 to the Present (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). An intensive study of Canada since World War II concentrating on selected themes in economic, political, social, and cultural history.

HIST 313          Quebec in the 19th Century (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course explores the major social, economic, and political issues that arose during the 1800s in the transformation of Quebec from a pre-industrial to an industrial society.

HIST 314          Quebec in the 20th Century (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course explores the major social, economic, and political issues of 20th-century Quebec in the light of the concentration of economic power into relatively few hands early in the century and the declining importance of industrial production since World War II.

HIST 315          Rights and Freedoms in Canadian Society (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines historical and contemporary aspects of Canada’s culture of rights. Topics include the origins and workings of the Canadian Charter and critiques of rights culture.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 or POLI 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 318          Modernist New York (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course explores the history of “Modernist New York” from the vantage points of social and cultural history. Focusing on the decades between 1870 and 1930, it examines the interplay of culture and commerce, the histories of elites and recent immigrants, the role of race, and the dramatic changes in the cityscape.

HIST 319          Canadian History in Literature, Art and Film (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). An examination of some major events and themes in Canadian history as seen by writers, artists, and filmmakers. Topics will vary from year to year, but will be selected to illustrate how creative works may be combined with more conventional historical sources to enhance our understanding of the past.

HIST 320          American Culture, 1900–1945 (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines how American cultural expression was affected by the broader historical context of the period. Attention is given to changing aesthetic styles, the impact of technology on production and reception, and the role of culture as a representation of American identity.

HIST 321          American Culture Since 1945 (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines different forms of artistic expression in the U.S. since World War II. Attention is given to changing aesthetic styles and technological developments, as well as to the role of culture as an expression of American identity at home and abroad.

HIST 323          (also listed as CLAS 341)
                         Greek History from Alexander to the Roman Conquest
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). A political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Greek world from Alexander the Great to the Roman conquest of Greece in 146 BC.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for CLAS 341 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 324          United States, 1877-1924 (3 credits)
This course looks at the transformation of the United States from a rural debtor nation into an urban, industrial, and financial world power. It explores how a variety of social groups experienced this change as well as its impact on the meaning of democracy, the role of government and the definition of citizenship. The course also examines U.S. foreign relations in this period.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 325          The European Renaissance (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course surveys European history from the beginnings of the Italian Renaissance in the late-14th century to the Reformation in the early-16th century. Major themes include Renaissance humanism, the emergence of print culture, the exploration of the New World, changes in social structure, and the consolidation of monarchy.

HIST 326          Reformations in Early Modern Europe (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course surveys the history of Europe from the early Reformation through the end of Europe’s religious wars in the mid-17th century. Major themes include the politics of religion, the growth of commerce and social change, competition for empire, and transformation in scientific and political worldviews.

HIST 327          (also listed as CLAS 343)
                         History of the Roman Empire
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course offers a political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Roman Empire from Augustus to the end of the Roman Empire in the West.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for CLAS 343 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 328          The Scientific Revolution (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course explores the Scientific Revolution in the context of early modern European society and culture. Major themes include the debates over the methods, purposes, and scope of science; the relationship between science, the supernatural, and the occult; the relationship between science, technology, and craft; and scientific networks, institutions, and means of communication.

HIST 330          (also listed as IRST 312)
                         The Great Irish Famine (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines the social, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of the Great Irish Famine. Beginning with a thorough examination of society and politics in the pre-Famine period, the course explores the causes and course of the 1845-50 Famine, with emphasis on social conditions, mass mortality, emigration, and British government responses to conditions in Ireland. The outcomes and long-term consequences of the Famine for Irish society, politics, Anglo-Irish relations, and the Irish Diaspora are also explored. Some attention is also given to historiographical debates and Famine memory.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for IRST 312 or for this topic under a HIST or IRST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 332          United States, Cuban and Mexican Relations (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines the history of the United States’ relations with both Cuba and Mexico from the mid-19th century to the present. As well as studying the ramifications of U.S. involvement in such events as the Spanish-American War (1898), the Mexican Revolution (1910), and the Cuban Revolution (1959), it examines the demographic, political, and cultural impact that Cubans and Mexicans have had on the modern development of the U.S.A.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 333          History of Haiti: From Contact to Independence (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course is a study of Haitian history from early colonization through French control to independence in 1804. It covers pre-Columbian Taino society and the Spanish conquest; the period of piracy and French buccaneering in the 16th and 17th centuries; the emergence of a colonial slave society in the 18th century; the Haitian revolution and the rise of Toussaint Louverture; questions of class and colour; the emergence of the state; contingencies of citizenship and independence. The legacies of the colonial and revolutionary periods are fundamental to an understanding of post-independence and present-day Haiti.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HIST 339 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 334          History of Haiti: From Independence to Present (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course is a study of Haitian history from independence to the present. It covers the early post-independence regimes; the demise of the plantation economy and the emergence of the Haitian peasantry; the indemnity to France; later 19th-century neo-colonialism and political instability; the U.S. Marine Occupation (1915 – 1934); culture, race and politics during and after the Occupation; the rise of the Duvalieriest state; and post-Duvalierist political instability.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HIST 339 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 335          Barbarian Invasions and the Birth of Europe (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines the arrival and settlement of new populations in the Roman world. It analyzes the changes that this event brought in its wake. Classical civilization was disrupted, but there was also a symbiosis of the old and the new, which in time gave rise to Europe in the Middle Ages.

HIST 336          Deviancy and Orthodoxy in the History of Mexico (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course traces Mexican history from the colonial period to the modern era through an analysis of the various groups that state and society have defined as deviant, including barbarians, heretics, vagrants, lunatics, prostitutes, bandits, and insurgents. This course examines what the shifting preoccupations with and the persecutions of these groups reveal about the creation of political and social orthodoxy in Mexico across time.

HIST 340          Early Modern Britain and Ireland (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course surveys early modern British history, focusing on the Tudor and Stuart periods. Major themes include religious and cultural change, economic and social transformation, the formation of a modern state amid recurring periods of political conflict, changing relations between the “Three Kingdoms” of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and the beginnings of commercial and colonial expansion.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for HIST 342 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 341          History of Britain Since 1714 (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course is a survey of the political, economic, and social development of Britain since the Stuart Era.

HIST 344          Rise and Fall of Yugoslavia (3 credits)
Through the study of the rise and fall of Yugoslavia during the 20th century, this course examines themes of modern European history, including empire, nationalism, democracy, fascism, war, genocide, and ethnic cleansing.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 345          Postwar Japanese History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines Japan since the end of World War II. While tracing Japan’s rise to the status of an economic power, this course focuses primarily on social and cultural history.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 346          Sexuality in History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course looks at the topic of human sexuality taking a broad view, both in time (from the Ancient world to the 20th century) and space (featuring Asia and Africa as well as the Western world). Rather than surveying the impossibly large canvas of sex throughout world history, this course looks at a number of particular topics (e.g. marital sexuality, same-sex relationships, sexual violence) in different cultures.

HIST 347          Gender and Sexuality in South Asia (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course surveys the history of gender and sexuality in South Asia (India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh) from 1500 to the present, beginning in the Mughal period and concluding with an investigation of the post-colonial experience. Topics may include masculinity at the Mughal court, the European woman’s imperial “burden,” the regulation of sexuality in the Indian anti-colonial movement, the queer experience, identity formation in diaspora, and gender and religious fundamentalism.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 348          History of Violence: Middle East 1798 – Present (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines the multiple facets of violence in Middle Eastern historical contexts. The objective is to develop a critical approach for thinking about the nature of violence by using a historical perspective to complicate commonplace oppositions between its legitimate and illegitimate forms or its intelligibility and unintelligibilty. Students explore the differences among state-sanctioned violence, resistance movements, and terrorism.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 350          Medieval England (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines the history of England between the Norman Conquest in 1066 and 1500. Topics include the political, social, and cultural impact of the Norman Conquest; Jews and the expulsion of 1290; knights and peasants; the Peasant’s Revolt of 1381; crime and the Robin Hood legends; heresy and popular religion; urban culture and guilds.

HIST 352          German History in the 20th Century (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course studies the ideological, cultural, political, and socio-economic development of Germany from the First World War to the present.

HIST 353          Colonial America and the Atlantic World (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course explores the economic, political, and cultural history of the Atlantic world as a context for understanding developments in 17th- and 18th-century North America, including Native-European relations, migrations, religious controversies, slavery, revolts and independence movements.

HIST 354          Revolutionary America (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines themes and issues in the revolutionary and early national periods of American history.

HIST 355          United States in the 19th Century, 1815–1850 (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). A study of American political, social, and economic life from the end of the War of 1812 to about 1850 — the intensification of sectionalism. Topics include geographic expansion and the beginnings of industrialization, the characteristics of southern slave society, and the rise of a system of political parties during the age of Jackson.

HIST 356          United States in the 19th Century: The Era of the Civil War (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). A study of American political, social, and economic life before and after the Civil War, from about 1850 to 1890. Topics include sectionalism and the breakdown of parties during the 1850s, the tasks of Reconstruction after the war, the New South, and the problems of a maturing industrial society.

HIST 357          Foreign Relations of the United States to 1945 (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course provides an analysis of United States foreign policy from the American Revolution to the conclusion of the Second World War, emphasizing the domestic debate over foreign policy, national security, and economic development; commercial and territorial expansion; and the dynamics of Canadian-American relations.

HIST 358          Foreign Relations of the United States, 1945 to the Present (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This is an historical investigation of United States foreign policy from the end of the Second World War to the present, emphasizing the United States’ responses to the challenge of revolutions in Asia, Africa, Europe and Latin America, American conceptions of a new world order, the rise of the multinational corporation, globalization, terrorism, humanitarian intervention, and developments in Canadian-American relations.

HIST 359          (also listed as SOCI 366)
                         The History and Sociology of Genocide to 1945 (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). Through the comparative and historical examination of a number of cases, this course investigates the meaning of genocide and the processes that have led to genocide up to 1945.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for SOCI 366 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 360          (also listed as SOCI 367)
                        The History and Sociology of Genocide from 1945 to the Present (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). Through the comparative and historical examination of a number of cases, this course investigates the meaning of genocide and the processes that led to genocide from 1945 to the present.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for SOCI 367 may not take this course for credit.

HIST 363          Africa in the 20th Century (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines 20th-century African history. Beginning with the colonial conquests, the course traces the processes of social, cultural, and economic change that have shaped Africans’ experience of colonial domination and postcolonial statehood. Emphasis is placed on the ways in which historical change has been interpreted in African cultural production.

HIST 364          Modern South Asia (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). British conquest established nearly two centuries of colonial rule over the world’s oldest civilization. This course examines the nature of imperial control, the resistance of traditional leaders, European intellectual imperialism, Indian cultural and religious revivalism, and modern nationalism. Special attention is paid to M.K. Gandhi and Gandhism as well as to Muslim separatism and the Pakistan movement.

HIST 365          Human Rights and Genocide Prevention in History (3 credits)
Human rights and humanitarian intervention to prevent genocide are contested concepts. This course examines the roots of Western notions of human rights, the evolution of the concept, and case studies clarifying the challenges confronting advocates and critics of humanitarian intervention. Historical examples address the uses of diplomacy, economic assistance, conflict management, and force in mass atrocity prevention and interdiction.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 366          Early Modern China (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines Chinese history during the Qing dynasty (1644-1912), with emphasis on political, social, diplomatic, and intellectual issues.

HIST 367          Modern China (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines China’s history since the fall of the Qing dynasty in 1912, with particular emphasis on the Nationalist and Communist revolutionary movements and on China’s transformation since the establishment of the People’s Republic of China in 1949.

HIST 368          African Popular Culture (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course explores the varied terrain of African popular culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. The materials examined in this course range broadly, including not only scholarly work, but also fiction, film, music, and images that provide entry points into the ways African artists, youth, officials, freedom fighters, market women, bachelors, gangsters, and others have engaged culturally with the world around them.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 369          Middle East: Empire, Gender, and Sexuality in Modern Times (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines the historical formation and intersection of three distinct phenomena: empire, gender, and sexuality. From the everyday practices of family life to the form of politics and the balance of geo-strategic relations, the 19th and 20th centuries witnessed a radical transformation of human organization within the Middle East and globally. Topics may include imperialism, state formation, nationalism, Orientalism, feminism, and Islam.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 370          Japanese Popular Culture (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course traces the history of Japanese popular culture from the 1600s to the present, with emphasis on the last 50 years. The major focus is on the evolution of Japanese popular media such as films, anime, and manga. Other themes such as youth culture, fashion, and the spread of Japanese popular culture outside of the country’s borders are explored. No background knowledge or Japanese language skills are required.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 371          History of the Russian Revolutionary Movement, 1825-1922 (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course traces the evolution of the Russian revolutionary movement from the Decembrist Revolt (1825) to the Bolshevik consolidation of power (1922). Emphasis is placed on the development of Russian conceptions of socialism, Marxism, and anarchism; the roles undertaken by women in various revolutionary groups; and the Russian contribution to the development of modern terrorism.

HIST 372          Latin American History Via the Novel (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines modern Latin American history and its representation by comparing “fictional” and “factual” depictions of key issues and significant events including economic imperialism, political revolution, and race relations. Texts such as Gabriel García Márquez’s literary masterpiece One Hundred Years of Solitude are used.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 373          The Pacific War (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course explores the history of the Pacific War, from its origins in the expansion of the Japanese empire to the atomic bombings, Japan’s surrender, and the shaping of postwar Asia. While covering battles, strategy and tactics, and the weapons of war, the course also looks at diverse themes such as home fronts, propaganda, and how the war has been remembered and represented since 1945.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 374          Egypt and the World Since 1798 (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course explores the social, cultural, and political histories of Egypt between the Napoleonic conquest and the present. Special attention is paid to the formation of Egyptian national identity in a post-Ottoman international context.

HIST 376          The Caribbean and the Atlantic World (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course covers the period from post-Columbian contact to the late-19th century. Themes include the link between sugar and slavery; the slave trade and the emergence of plantation-based colonialism; racialized social and economic structures; slave resistance; the politics of abolition; alternative labour forms; and the rise of political movements.

HIST 377          History of Russia, 1694-1917 (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course traces Russian history from the era of Peter the Great to the Bolshevik Revolution. Emphasis is placed on long-term trends that continue to affect Russia today such as political liberty, economic development, warfare and foreign affairs, and gender relations.

HIST 378          History of the Soviet Union (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines the main economic, social, and political developments of the history of the Soviet Union from its creation in 1917 to its collapse in 1991. Particular attention is paid to the Stalin era, the impact of World War II, and the Cold War.

HIST 379          History through Visual Media and Material Culture (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). Public encounters with history are increasingly mediated by television, film, the Internet, and museological experiences. This course explores the relationship between the public and the past by examining issues in the production, distribution, and reception of history via these new and changing technologies.

HIST 380          History and Digital Media (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course offers an introduction to the changes that new media and technologies are bringing to historical research, writing, presentation, and teaching of the past. The course begins with an overview of the history of the Internet and digital media, and then examines historical work on a variety of subjects — by scholars, teachers, archivists, museum curators, and popular historians — published on the web. Historical and critical readings provide the basis for the hands-on section of the course in which students develop pilot online history projects.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this course under a HIST 387 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 381          History and Public Policy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines the uses of history and the role of the historian in the political, legal, and social arenas, focusing on cases in which the past has underwritten social movements or mediated public controversies. Topics may include professional work with government and non-governmental organizations, expert analyses and testimony before tribunals and truth commissions in human rights cases, Native land claims, reparations, restorative justice, and the repatriation of cultural artifacts.

HIST 382          Age of Enlightenment (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course surveys the intellectual and cultural history of Europe and the Atlantic World from the later 17th century through the 18th century.

HIST 383          Age of Revolution (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course focuses on the French political and English industrial revolutions and their consequences throughout Europe. Colonialism, slavery, and the Atlantic revolutions in the Americas are considered to the extent that they contributed to, or were influenced by, the revolutions in Europe.

HIST 384          Age of Industrialization and Nationalism 1848-1914 (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). A study of the transformation of European society, economy, and politics in the years between the upheavals of the mid-19th century and the collapse of the traditional order in World War I.

HIST 385          Age of Dictators: Europe, 1914-1945 (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). A study of the internal development and external relations of the nations of Europe from the Great War to the end of World War II. The course examines this chaotic age primarily through an investigation of the revolutionary and reactionary upheavals that kept Europe socially, politically, and economically unbalanced for 30 years.

HIST 386          Contemporary Europe: 1945 to the Present (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). A study of the internal development and external relations of the nations of Europe from the collapse of Nazi Germany to the present. The course concentrates on the divisions between East and West, the economic recovery of Europe and the effects of the energy crisis on social, economic, and political life throughout Europe.

HIST 387          Selected Topics in Public History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). Specific topics for this course, and relevant prerequisites, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

HIST 388          Telling Stories: Oral History, Memoryscapes and Digital Storytelling (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course is an introduction to oral history theory, ethics, and practice, and surveys the many oral history projects underway in Montreal and around the globe.

HIST 389          Ethnography: Doing Micro-History of the Present (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course introduces basic tools of ethnographic research and documenting using both traditional and new media, with attention to ethical, political, interpersonal, and aesthetic issues.

HIST 391          Independent Study Tutorial in History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course permits individual study, with a selected faculty member, in a specialized area not available among regular 300-level classes.

HIST 392          France 1871 to the Present (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course introduces students to the history of France from the Commune of 1871 to the Fifth Republic. This course deals with such issues as the Dreyfus Affair, the legacy of two World Wars in French history, the Vichy regime, collaboration and French fascism, the May events of 1968, and so forth. Political, social, and intellectual developments will be discussed.

HIST 394          Food in History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course considers the economic, political, and cultural changes in food production, diets and cuisines from 1700 to the present from a global, comparative perspective. Lectures, primary and secondary source readings, films, research and hands-on activities explore diverse topics such as hunting and gathering; cooking traditions and innovations; cultural and ethical dimensions of eating and fasting; agriculture and food markets; the politics of famine; factory farms, industrial processing, and nutritional science; the emergence of the restaurant, the supermarket, fast food; and the globalization of modern diets.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.
 
HIST 395          Environmental History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course surveys major themes and problems in global environmental history from the last ice age to the present, but focusing primarily on Europe, Africa, Oceania, and the Americas since 1500. Topics include the history of ideas about nature; climate change; the Columbian Exchange; the environmental impact of science, technology, population growth, and urbanization; the politics of conservation; and environmentalism.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under a HIST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

HIST 396          The United States Since 1945 (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). The immediate historical background of today’s America is the subject matter of this course. Major themes include civil rights, the rise of modern feminism, and economic change.

HIST 397          History and Sound (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (1). This course examines sound as a historical subject and a medium for understanding the past. Emphasizing aural rather than visual sources, it addresses a variety of topics including the history of aural art forms such as music and radio; sound recording and transmission technologies; commercial uses of sound; architectural acoustics; and the evolution of soundscapes. The course may include training in the production of radio documentaries, urban sound walks, and audio podcasts.

HIST 398          Selected Topics in History (3 credits)
Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

HIST 402          The Philosophy and Practice of History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Approved honours standing in History, or permission of the Department. This course examines problems in the philosophy and practice of history. Particular attention is given to contemporary debates about history as a distinctive mode of understanding and explanation. This course is required of all honours students.

HIST 403          Methodology and History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Approved honours standing in History, or permission of the Department. This course examines the variety of sources, methods, and modes of analysis used in the research and writing of history. It addresses both theoretical and practical aspects of method. This course is required of all honours students.

HIST 412          Advanced Study in Canadian History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2). Advanced seminar in a selected topic in the history of Canada. The emphasis is on encouraging students to conduct historical investigation on their own, under a professor’s guidance. The specific content varies from year to year depending on the instructor.

HIST 437          Advanced Study in European History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2). Advanced seminar in a selected topic in the history of Europe. The emphasis is on encouraging students to conduct historical investigation on their own, under a professor’s guidance. The specific content varies from year to year depending on the instructor.

HIST 452          Advanced Study in American History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2). Advanced seminar in a selected topic in the history of the United States. The emphasis is on encouraging students to conduct historical investigation on their own, under a professor’s guidance. The specific content varies from year to year depending on the instructor.

HIST 457          Advanced Study in Latin American and Caribbean History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2). Advanced seminar in a selected topic in Latin American and/or Caribbean history. The emphasis is on encouraging students to conduct historical investigation on their own, under a professor’s guidance. The specific content varies from year to year depending on the instructor.

HIST 462          Advanced Study in Asian History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2). Advanced seminar in a selected topic in Asian history. The emphasis is on encouraging students to conduct historical investigation on their own, under a professor’s guidance. The specific content varies from year to year depending on the instructor.

HIST 467          Advanced Study in Middle Eastern History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2). Advanced seminar in a selected topic in Middle Eastern history. The emphasis is on encouraging students to conduct historical investigation on their own, under a professor’s guidance. The specific content varies from year to year depending on the instructor.

HIST 471          Advanced Study in African History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2). Advanced seminar in a selected topic in the history of Africa. The emphasis is on encouraging students to conduct historical investigation on their own, under a professor’s guidance. The specific content varies from year to year depending on the instructor.

HIST 475          Advanced Study in the History of Gender and Sexuality (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2). Advanced seminar in a selected topic in the history of gender and sexuality. The emphasis is on encouraging students to conduct historical investigation on their own, under a professor’s guidance. The specific content varies from year to year depending on the instructor.

HIST 477          Advanced Study in the History of Human Rights and Justice (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2). This advanced seminar focuses on a selected topic in the history of human rights and justice. The emphasis is on encouraging students to conduct historical investigation independently, under a professor’s supervision. The specific content may vary from year to year.

HIST 479          Advanced Study in Women’s History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2). Advanced seminar in a selected topic in women’s history. The emphasis is on encouraging students to conduct historical investigation on their own, under a professor’s guidance. The specific content varies from year to year depending on the instructor.

HIST 481          Advanced Study in Public History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2). Advanced seminar in a selected topic in public history. In addition to weekly discussions of relevant readings, the emphasis is on encouraging students to conduct historical investigation on their own, under a professor’s guidance. The specific content varies from year to year depending on the instructor.

HIST 485          Public History Workshop (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2); HIST 306. This course offers students the opportunity to conceive, plan, and carry out a project that presents a historical subject to the public. Students receive training in the public presentation of the past through several media and to a variety of audiences, and are encouraged to involve relevant parties outside the academy in the development of their project.

HIST 486          Public History Internship (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2); HIST 306. This internship in public history is designed to allow students to test and hone their skills in a non-academic situation. Placements will be arranged by the faculty member responsible for the course and may be drawn from various potential employment sectors: public, non-profit, and private. Students, in consultation with the employer and the faculty advisor, are expected to fully participate in the defining of their internships. Students work according to a detailed job description and devote a minimum of 100 hours to the fieldwork component of the internship, keep a logbook describing their work activities, and submit a 20-25 page written report that summarizes and evaluates their work experience, positioning it in relation to broader academic questions in the field of public history. The employers participate in the assessment of the intern’s work. Students may find it useful to have second-language proficiency for the purposes of this internship.

HIST 491          Individual Study Tutorial in History (3 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2). This course permits an individual student to pursue advanced study, with a selected faculty member, in a specialized area not available among scheduled 400-level seminars.

HIST 492          Individual Study Tutorial in History (6 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2). This course permits an individual student to pursue advanced study, with a selected faculty member, in a specialized area not available among scheduled 400-level seminars.

HIST 493          Honours Essay Tutorial (6 credits)
Prerequisite: See N.B. number (2). This course is open only to honours students in History. The student works with an individual faculty member in a particular area of history. Students are asked to produce a sustained piece of written work, not exceeding 40 pages in length, to be read by their advisor and at least one other member of the Department.

HIST 498          Advanced Topics in History (3 credits)
Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

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