Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/undergraduate/calendar/current/sec31/31-090.html

Education

Section 31.090

Please note that the current version of the Undergraduate Calendar is up to date as of February 2017.

Faculty

Chair
RICHARD F. SCHMID, PhD Arizona State University; Professor

Distinguished Professors Emeriti
HAROLD ENTWISTLE, PhD University of London
ELLEN JACOBS, MEd Tufts University
PATSY M. LIGHTBOWN, PhD Columbia University
SANDRA WEBER, PhD University of Alberta

Professors
PHILIP ABRAMI, PhD University of Manitoba; Provost’s Distinction
ROBERT BERNARD, PhD University of Washington
PAUL BOUCHARD, PhD Université de Montréal
WALCIR CARDOSO, PhD McGill University
SAUL CARLINER, PhD Georgia State University; Provost’s Distinction
AILIE CLEGHORN, PhD McGill University
MIRANDA D’AMICO, PhD McGill University
NINA HOWE, PhD University of Waterloo

Associate Professors
LAURA COLLINS, PhD Concordia University
ANN-LOUISE DAVIDSON, PhD University of Ottawa
ARPI HAMALIAN, MA American University of Beirut
SARA KENNEDY, PhD McGill University
SANDRA MARTIN-CHANG, PhD McMaster University
KIM MCDONOUGH, PhD Georgetown University
M. AYAZ NASEEM, PhD McGill University
HELENA P. OSANA, PhD University of Wisconsin-Madison
DIANE PESCO, PhD McGill University
HARICLIA PETRAKOS, PhD McGill University
STEVEN SHAW, PhD Concordia University
PAVEL TROFIMOVICH, PhD University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
VIVEK VENKATESH, PhD Concordia University
DAVID WADDINGTON, PhD Stanford University
JOANNA L. WHITE, PhD McGill University

Assistant Professors
ADEELA ARSHAD-AYAZ, PhD McGill University
CAROLINA CAMBRE, PhD University of Alberta
SANDRA CHANG-KREDL, PhD McGill University
GIULIANA CUCINELLI, PhD McGill University
HOLLY RECCHIA, PhD Concordia University

Senior Lecturers
TERESA HERNANDEZ-GONZALEZ, PhD Universidad Complutense de Madrid
SARA WEINBERG, MA Concordia University

Lecturers
ELSA LO, PhD McGill University
HEIKE NEUMANN, PhD McGill University

For the complete list of faculty members, please consult the Department website.


Location

Sir George Williams Campus
Faubourg Building
1610 St. Catherine St. W., Room: FG 5.150
514-848-2424, ext. 200


Department Objectives

The Department of Education offers general undergraduate programs as well as two teacher-training programs. The general programs focus on educational issues for lifelong learning, while the teacher-training programs are specifically for Early Childhood and Elementary Education and the Teaching of English as a Second Language. Students receive expert supervision in their field placements and are carefully guided in their methods courses. The Department values creativity and innovation in the teaching/learning environment and instills in its students a sense of responsibility with respect to equality, diversity and non-discrimination.


Programs

(For Teaching of English as a Second Language, see §31.090.1; for Adult Education, see §31.090.2)
Students are responsible for satisfying their particular degree requirements.
The superscript indicates credit value.

  24    Minor in Education
  24    Chosen from EDUC 2106, 2303, 2403, 2703, 2983, 2996, 3053, 3073, 3213,
          3983, 3996, 4053, 4113, 4223, 4263, 4273, 4503, 4543, 4983, 4996
 
120    BA Specialization in Early Childhood and Elementary Education
  93    Group A
          ARTE 2013; EDUC 2106, 2113, 2223, 2603, 2643, 2953, 2963, 2973, 3013,
          3113, 3553, 3803, 3813, 3823, 3843, 3863, 3873, 3883, 3953, 3963, 4003, 4453,
          4503, 4543, 4933, 4943, 4953, 4963; TESL 2323
    6    Group B
          Chosen from EDUC 2303, 3043, 3053, 3073, 3153, 3213, 3833, 3853, 4053, 4063,
          4113, 4223, 4233, 4263, 4273, 4343, 4643, 4983
  21    Group C
          Elective credits chosen from a list approved by the Department
NOTE 1: This program is open to full-time students only. In addition to the application submitted to the University, specialization applicants MUST complete an additional application which may be obtained from the Early Childhood and Elementary Education secretary.
NOTE 2: Students may be recommended to the Quebec Teachers Certification Service for a Quebec permanent teaching diploma, valid for teaching kindergarten and cycles 1 to 3 (Grades 1 to 6) provided they have met the following requirements: 1. successfully completing the degree and certification requirements for the BA Specialization in Early Childhood and Elementary Education; 2. satisfying the English language proficiency requirements of the MEES; and 3. applying to graduate.
To remain in the Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization program and to be recommended for certification, students must:

  1. achieve at least a “B” grade in each of the following practicum courses: EDUC 295, 296, 297, 395, 396, 493, 494, 495, 496;
    and
  2. achieve at least a “C+” grade in each of the following methods courses: EDUC 222, 301, 355, 380, 381, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387, 388.

Students who obtain a grade that is below the above required level will be placed on conditional standing within the program and will be so informed in writing. Students will be allowed to repeat the course in question only once, the next time the course is given, in order to achieve the required grade. (For the status of this grade as part of the student record, see §16.2.6.)
Students who fail to achieve the above minimum grades in two internships/methods courses (i.e. failing the same internship/methods course twice or two different internships/methods courses) cannot continue in the program and will be required to withdraw from the Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization program (see §16.2.6).

  45    BA Major in Child Studies
  24    EDUC 2106, 2113, 2503, 2603, 3023, 3113, 3603
  15    From one area of concentration*
    6    Chosen from EDUC 2303, 3053, 3073, 3153, 3213, 4053, 4113, 4223, 4263,
          4643, 4983
*See areas of concentration.

          Areas of Concentration
          A. Early Childhood Settings (15 credits)
  15    EDUC 3033, 3043, 4063, 4603, 4613
          B. Exceptionality and Diversity in Childhood Settings (15 credits)
  15    EDUC 3613, 3623, 4023, 4623, 4633

For other programs which may be of particular interest to teachers, see §23.


Courses


EDUCATION

EDUC 200        English Exam for Teacher Certification (0 credit)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization, Teaching English as a Second Language Specialization, or Art Education Major or Specialization. The regulation respecting teaching licences requires that all students admitted to a teacher education program demonstrate their proficiency in the language of instruction as a condition for certification. To fulfill this requirement, students are required to register and write the exam approved by the MEES. Students must pass this exam prior to the start of the following internships: EDUC 493, TESL 486 or 487, and ARTE 423.

EDUC 210        Psychology of Education (6 credits)
This course introduces students to a broad range of content in educational psychology, including its scope and methods, learning motivation, growth and development, adjustment, individual differences, guidance, and concept of self.

EDUC 211        Child Development I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization, or Major in Child Studies. This course provides an introduction to current theory (e.g. cognitive, social-cognitive, social learning) about children’s development and covers various domains of development (social, emotional, cognitive, physical) from conception to age 12. The implications of children’s development in relation to various contexts (e.g. family, neighbourhood, peers, education) are discussed.

EDUC 222        Exploring Movement with Children (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization. From a multidisciplinary perspective, this course examines the following topics: the relationship between movement and self-knowledge, psychomotor development, and the role of physical activity in primary education. The course addresses the teacher’s role in incorporating movement into the curriculum for all children, including those with special needs through the use of specific techniques and activities.

EDUC 230        Introduction to Philosophy of Education (3 credits)
This course introduces the student to the content and form of several major educational theories, and to conceptual and logical procedures of philosophizing about education, with particular reference to teaching and learning.

EDUC 240        Introduction to Training and Development (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of the design and development of training in organizations by introducing students to theoretical and practical concepts. Topics explored include the organizational and personal benefits of training, different modes of delivery including e-learning (an instructional systems design approach to training development), the transfer of learned skills to the workplace environment, the evaluation of training, the management of the development process, and trends and successful practices in the field.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under an EDUC 298 number may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 250        Introductory Information Literacy Skills in Education (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to basic research practices used in the field of education and its related disciplines. It familiarizes students with a variety of information sources in both print and non-print formats. Emphasis is placed on developing a systematic search strategy and the use and evaluation of the information sources. Topics such as outlining and bibliographic formats are covered as part of the research process.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for INST 250 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 260        Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Early Childhood and
                         Elementary Education
(3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization, or Major in Child Studies. This course is an introduction to the historical and philosophical foundations of early childhood education. The development of institutions for the care and education of young children is discussed in relation to changes in the family, concepts of childhood, and educational theories. Students use methods of historical and philosophical inquiry to examine current issues in early education, including school readiness, early literacy, integration, multiculturalism, and public policy. The objective is to provide students with the basis for identifying and critiquing problems in education.

EDUC 264        Communication: Child, Parent and Teacher (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits or permission of the Department; enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization. This course focuses on the role parents play in the various stages of the child’s academic, social, and emotional development. The format for this course is unique in that parents of the children in the observation nursery are involved, and students interact with them by conducting and participating in parent-teacher seminars. Topics include parenting, the impact of the family on the child’s classroom behaviour, child abuse, cultural issues, disciplinary measures at home and in school, the coordination of home-and-school academic goals, and achievement motivation.

EDUC 270        Educational Communication (3 credits)
In this course, students study fundamental communication skills used by effective instructors. By examining how to write the most basic types of instructional content, including definitions, objectives, descriptions and procedures, and the most common forms of written instructional content, including how-to articles and lesson plans, this practical, writing-intensive course emphasizes effective instructional communication methodologies.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under an EDUC 298 number may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 295        Internship I: Prekindergarten Teaching (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization; EDUC 296 concurrently and in their first year of the ECEE program. This internship gives students first-hand knowledge of the importance of early education. It permits students to develop preliminary skills in observing, assessing, and meeting the needs of individual children, articulating educational objectives, working effectively with small groups, and planning and implementing a play-based curriculum. Students are placed in a prekindergarten class one day a week for a total of 60 hours.

EDUC 296        Prekindergarten Teaching Seminar (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization; EDUC 295 concurrently. This course supports EDUC 295 by offering a thorough introduction to theoretical and applied aspects of early childhood education through a weekly seminar consisting of lectures, discussions, and video presentations on such topics as the educational and developmental needs of young children, models of education, the role of the teacher, play-based curriculum and instruction, health and safety issues, and the design of appropriate prekindergarten learning environments.

EDUC 297        Internship II: Observation and Evaluation in Education (3 credits)
Prerequisite: EDUC 295, 296; enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization. The purpose of this course is to teach students how to conduct evaluations at the elementary-school level. Students learn observation techniques, documentation procedures, authentic assessment, and formative and summative evaluation. Students learn how to create a dynamic profile of the child and how to prepare reports for parents, administrators, and specialists. Students conduct observations in recognized educational institutions (40 hours).
NOTE: Students who have received credit for EDUC 371, 373, and 375 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 298        Selected Topics in Education (3 credits)

EDUC 299        Selected Topics in Education (6 credits)

Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

EDUC 301        Integrating Computers into the Elementary Classroom (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization, Art Education Major or Specialization. This course provides an introduction to theoretical and practical knowledge regarding the use of computers in elementary school classrooms. Assignments are designed to provide students with hands-on experience with the computer. Topics include social interaction and equity, problem-solving skills, software evaluation, interactive technologies, and curriculum planning.

EDUC 302        Working in Childhood Settings: Leadership and Organizational Issues (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Major in Child Studies. This course provides students with an introduction to leadership in childhood settings, with a focus on child care. Issues reviewed include the organizational framework, quality of curriculum, human resources, leadership styles, financial and administrative matters, environments, and community relationships.

EDUC 303        Children, Families, and Social Policy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: EDUC 210 and 211; enrolment in Major in Child Studies. This course examines social policy as it relates to children and families in Canada. Policies may include such areas as children’s rights, child care, education, health, and social welfare.

EDUC 304        Children’s Play in Childhood Settings (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization, or Major in Child Studies; EDUC 210 and 211. This course introduces students to (1) developmental theories of children’s play, and (2) practical ways that play can be facilitated in early childhood settings. Emphasis is placed on understanding: types of play (e.g. pretend, physical, solitary, social, rough and tumble); play-based curriculum and the role of the educator; toys, materials, and environments that promote high-quality play; cultural diversity and play; and play in inclusive environments.

EDUC 305        Technology for Educational Change (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Education or permission of the Department. This course provides an introduction to advances in the theory, research, and practice of educational technology. Projects and activities allow for a diversity of interests.

EDUC 307        Integrating Digital Technologies and Social Media in Learning Environments
                         
(3 credits)
This course introduces students to the social and cognitive theories of digital technologies in learning and training environments. These technologies include hardware such as interactive tablets and screens, mobile devices, and software such as online multimedia, video, serious games and social media. This course discusses these technologies using problem-based learning approaches. Students also engage in practical project-based activities.

EDUC 311        Child Development II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: EDUC 211; enrolment in Early Child­hood and Elementary Education Specialization, or Major in Child Studies. This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth review of the developmental, psychological, and socio-cultural aspects of the child and the family. Emphasis is placed on structural elements related to the modern family (e.g. family size, developmental tasks), family relations (e.g. transition to parenthood, parenting styles, early relationships) and problems and issues (e.g. employed mothers, divorce, child care, cultural differences, teenage mothers).

EDUC 315        Sexual Health Education for Children and Youths (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in the Specialization in Early Childhood and Elementary Education; or 30 university credits and enrolment in the Major in Child Studies or the Minor in Interdisciplinary Studies in Sexuality. By evaluating available resources, practical tools, and curricula in today’s Canadian society, this course familiarizes students with approaches to sexual health education that are suitable for working with children and youth in a variety of educational settings, including the home, community agencies, and schools. The importance of gearing education to accommodate different developmental stages, ages, and local social contexts is stressed.

EDUC 321        Sex Role Socialization in the School (3 credits)
This course focuses upon how children at the elementary- and secondary-school level are socialized for different work roles, and how work segregation has occurred on the basis of this process. The role of schools and curriculum is examined in relation to cultural changes in social roles.

EDUC 355        Teaching Ethics and Religious Culture (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization. This course enables students to develop a stimulating and sensitive ethics and religious culture program that promotes children’s ability to (a) reflect on ethical questions, (b) demonstrate an understanding of the phenomenon of religion, and (c) engage in dialogue with others. Relevant resource materials are examined and assignments focus upon development of activities for the elementary-level classroom.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for THEO 355 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 360        Introduction to Inclusive Practices (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Major in Child Studies; EDUC 210 and 211.This course is an introduction to inclusive practices for children with special needs in childhood settings. Topics include the evolution of special education; laws and policies; current models of service delivery; identification and assessment of learning needs; advocacy; and collaboration with families.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for EDUC 450 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 361        Inclusive Practices in Early Childhood Settings (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Major in Child Studies; EDUC 360. This course focuses on the implementation of inclusive practices in early childhood settings. Topics include differentiating and adapting curriculum; meeting the needs of individual children; collaborating with families and professionals; implementing developmentally appropriate practices; and facilitating development in various domains (social-emotional, cognitive, behavioural and communication).
NOTE: Students who have received credit for EDUC 490 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 362        Inclusive Practices for School-Aged Populations (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Major in Child Studies and EDUC 360. This course focuses on the implementation of inclusive practices in school-aged populations, (K – 11 settings). Topics include differentiating and adapting curriculum; meeting the needs of individual students; collaborating with families, teachers, and other professionals; implementing evidence-based strategies to promote literacy and academic achievement; and facilitating social-emotional, cognitive, and behavioural competencies.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for EDUC 491 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 380        Teaching Language Arts I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits; enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization. This course enables students to acquire the necessary skills for developing a stimulating and appropriate language arts program for kindergarten and primary grades. Current theories of literacy development and implications for planning and instruction are addressed. The course focuses on listening, speaking, reading, and writing, emphasizing the integration of language arts activities into other subject areas.

EDUC 381        Teaching Language Arts II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits including EDUC 380; enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization. This course is a continuation of EDUC 380 with special emphasis on teaching language arts in Grades 3 to 6. Students become familiar with Quebec Education Program (QEP) guidelines, and various ways to organize and evaluate their implementation.

EDUC 382        Teaching Science Concepts in the Elementary Classroom (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits; enrolment in Early Child­hood and Elementary Education Specialization. This course examines areas of science which are relevant to elementary education and emphasizes the development of the spirit of scientific inquiry. Resource materials, teaching methodology, and classroom activities are examined and evaluated in light of the MEES guidelines. Assignments emphasize developing activities for classroom use.

EDUC 383        Promoting Moral and Spiritual Attitudes and Values in Children (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits; enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization. This course is designed to introduce students to the various issues involving the development of moral judgment and reasoning in children. Cultural, social, cognitive, and emotional factors influencing the growth of morality are discussed. The major focus is on examining methods and techniques to enhance the personal development of positive social behaviours (i.e. helping, sharing, and caring).

EDUC 384        Teaching Social Studies in Elementary Schools (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits; enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization. This course examines the teaching of social studies to elementary-school-age children.

EDUC 385        Teaching a Second Language in Early Childhood and Elementary School (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits; enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization. This course is designed to give teachers a background in current theories of language acquisition and second language learning. Teaching methodologies such as immersion, enrichment, and core/complementary curricula are studied and resource materials are examined and evaluated. Assignments include the development of appropriate classroom activities at the elementary level.

EDUC 386        Teaching Mathematics I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 15 credits; enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization. This course introduces a conceptual analysis of school mathematics and its application to the early childhood and elementary education classrooms. Topics include numeracy acquisition, counting, whole number operations, and problem solving. Emphasis is placed on the development of children’s thinking and pedagogical practices aimed at assisting students to think mathematically. Current mathematics curricula are examined and evaluated in this context.

EDUC 387        Teaching Mathematics II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits; enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization; EDUC 386. This course continues a conceptual analysis of school mathematics and its application to the elementary classroom. Topics include fractions, decimals, proportions, per cents, algebraic reasoning, and geometry. Emphasis is placed on the development of children’s thinking and pedagogical practices aimed at assisting students to think mathematically. Current mathematics curricula are examined and evaluated in this context.

EDUC 388        Teaching Mathematics III (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits; enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization; EDUC 387. This course continues a conceptual analysis of school mathematics and its application to the elementary classroom. Topics include algebra, geometry, probability, statistics, and data analysis. Emphasis is placed on the development of children’s thinking and pedagogical practices aimed at assisting students to think mathematically. Current mathematics curricula are examined and evaluated in this context.

EDUC 395        Internship III: Kindergarten Teaching (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization; 30 credits including EDUC 295, 296, 297; EDUC 396 concurrently. This internship is an eight-week (200 hours) supervised student-teaching experience in a full-day kindergarten classroom. Students share in the daily work of their co-operating teachers, and progress gradually from being participant observers working with small groups to taking charge of the whole class. Students practise their skills in activity planning, intervention strategies, the evaluation of student learning, and the management of classroom routines.

EDUC 396        Kindergarten Teaching Seminar (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization; 30 credits including EDUC 295, 296, 297; EDUC 395 concurrently. This seminar complements EDUC 395 by providing the opportunity, means, and impetus for students to reflect critically on their teaching philosophy and practice. Topics include the development of appropriate and stimulating learning environments, Ministère de l’Éducation et de l’Enseignement supérieur (MEES) kindergarten program guidelines, planning and implementation of learning centres, teaching centres, teaching the “whole” child, teacher-parent relationships, and other current issues in kindergarten education.

EDUC 398        Selected Topics in Education (3 credits)

EDUC 399        Selected Topics in Education (6 credits)

Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

EDUC 400        Teaching Across the Curriculum (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization. Using language arts and the social sciences as the starting point, this course outlines different models for integrating school subjects in curriculum programming. Special attention is given to social science methodology, thematic planning and project work, and to the use of literature and drama. Students examine the links between the different programs of study developed for Quebec schools and their overall implications for curriculum planning.

EDUC 402        Diversity Issues in Childhood (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Major Child Studies; EDUC 210 and 211. This course explores the diversity of contemporary Canadian childhood, including issues related to immigration, language, culture, and socioeconomic status. The course reviews theoretical approaches to diversity and examines how these shape practice with children and families in education and other fields.

EDUC 405        Children and Technology (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits. This course examines the interaction between children and technology from a socio-cultural perspective, including the effects of media such as television, computers, and the Internet. Emphasis is placed on the developing child in the context of communication and technology as related to informal educational activities and play.

EDUC 406        Educational Aspects of Physical Activity, Health and Wellness (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Major Child Studies; EDUC 210 and 211. This course examines the basic principles and practices of health, safety, physical activity, and nutrition that promote the wellness of young children in early childhood environments. Topics include health promotion; illness and prevention; physical activity; nutrition; safety promotion; preventing child maltreatment; and stress in the lives of young children. Students examine legislative requirements of group care, which are necessary to plan safe, inclusive and developmentally appropriate environments.

EDUC 411        Toys, Media Literacy and Children’s Popular Culture (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in an Education program or permission of the Department. This interdisciplinary course examines the multiple roles that toys and the popular culture of childhood and adolescence can play in relation to development, learning, socialization and identity processes. Topics addressed include cultural and personal meanings constructed around toys, media literacy, the increasing role of new technologies, and issues related to the branding and marketing of toys through the media.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under an EDUC 498 number may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 422        Sociology of Education I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits. This course emphasizes sociological concepts and their theoretical and practical applications to the study of education. The focus is on the following: how the education system is structured, how schooling and education fit into the overall social structure, how educational experiences vary for members of different social groups, the role education plays in gender, class, and racial inequalities, the complexity of issues relating to student evaluation and performance, and the role education plays in social change.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for EDUC 421 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 423        Sociology of Education II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: EDUC 422. This course considers how a particular sociological viewpoint contributes to our understanding of school life. Topics include family, socialization patterns, teacher and pupil perspectives, and how these are interrelated.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for EDUC 421 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 426        Comparative Education I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Six credits in Education. This course undertakes the study of the impact of political and cultural differences upon educational systems (for example, the impact of language differences, nationalism, colonialism, neocoloni­alism, political socialization). The approach is comparative, with particular emphasis on contrasting educational systems and practice in selected countries.

EDUC 427        Comparative Education II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Six credits in Education. This course examines the sources and impacts of educational change from a comparative perspective. Topics include pedagogical alternatives; socio-political alternatives; educational implications of technological change and economic policy; policies of elitism and egalitarianism. Methods include comparative case study and analysis of specific theories of educational innovation.

EDUC 432        Seminar in Epistemology and Education (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Six credits in Education, or permission of the Department. Theories of knowledge are considered in this course, with special attention being given to the bearing of such topics as perception, evidence, truth, knowledge, and belief as relating to educational thought and practice. Students are expected to become familiar with recent periodical and other literature in the field.

EDUC 434        Aesthetics and Education (3 credits)
Prerequisite: EDUC 230 or permission of the Department. The nature of aesthetic value and experience, and theories of art and beauty are examined. The development of the emotions and imagination, and their functions in aesthetic awareness are central concerns of this course. Students are expected to become familiar with the relevant literature in the field.

EDUC 445        Education in Quebec (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits in a teacher certification program, or holder of a provisional teaching authorization, or permission of the Department. This course covers the history, the contemporary movements, and the structures of Quebec educa­tion. The historical section covers the period from 1608 until the present. Topics included are the legislation, regulations, rules, and directives pertaining to the respective roles of the Ministère de l’Éducation et de l’Enseignement supérieur (MEES), the school boards, the teachers, the parents, and the students in Quebec’s educa­tional system.
NOTE: Because this is a required course for all individuals enrolled in a Quebec program of teacher training, the content is controlled by the MEES.

EDUC 450        The Inclusive Classroom: Educating Exceptional Children (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits including EDUC 210 or 211. This course focuses on the education of children with special needs. Emphasis is placed on ways in which classroom teachers can provide appropriate help or instruction to meet the needs of exceptional children. Topics include identification and assessment of learning needs; adaptation of curriculum and activity design, service delivery models; parent-professional relationships; legislative policies.

EDUC 454        Diversity in the Classroom (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 credits including EDUC 210 or 211. Students examine the implications of diversity in the classroom for teaching, curriculum, and children’s educational experience. Various theoretical approaches are analyzed, including critical pedagogy, multicultural education, and intercultural education. The importance of inclusive curricula is discussed.

EDUC 460        Child Studies Field Experience: Child and Youth Settings (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Major in Child Studies; EDUC 302; EDUC 304 or 406; EDUC 461 concurrently. Students develop skills in observation and in planning curriculum for children in childhood settings. Students are required to participate in a field placement one day per week, for a total of 60 hours in settings such as daycares, after-school programs, recreation centres, libraries, museums, fine art centres, community organizations, hospitals, or rehabilitation centres.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for EDUC 374 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 461        Child Studies Seminar: Child and Youth Settings (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Major in Child Studies; EDUC 302; EDUC 304 or 406; EDUC 460 concurrently. This course complements EDUC 460 and covers theoretical and applied aspects of working with children in early childhood settings. This course focuses on reflective practices, curriculum planning and using observational techniques.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for EDUC 374 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 462        Child Studies Field Experience: Inclusive Practices in Childhood Settings (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Major in Child Studies; EDUC 360; EDUC 361 or 362; EDUC 463 concurrently. Students develop skills in observing and planning curriculum for children exhibiting a range of social-emotional, cognitive, behavioural, and academic competencies and needs. Students are required to participate in a field placement one day per week, for a total of 60 hours in settings such as schools, community organizations, hospitals, or rehabilitation centres.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for EDUC 492 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 463        Child Studies Seminar: Inclusive Practices in Childhood Settings (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Major in Child Studies; EDUC 360; EDUC 361 or 362; EDUC 462 concurrently. This course complements EDUC 462 and covers theoretical and applied aspects of working with children in inclusive childhood settings. This course focuses on reflective practices, curriculum planning and using observational techniques.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for EDUC 492 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 464        Research Methods in Child Studies (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 60 credits in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization, or Major in Child Studies. This course introduces students to quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research designs used by researchers in child studies and education. Students learn how research studies are conceptualized and conducted, and how data are analyzed and interpreted, and gain experience in the critical evaluation and application of research. Students complete a series of assignments during a lab section of the course. This course is primarily intended as a foundation for students who are preparing for graduate school.

EDUC 493        Internship IV: Primary Teaching (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization; EDUC 200 and 60 credits including EDUC 295, 296, 297, 395, 396; EDUC 494 concurrently. The internship is an eight-week (200 hours) supervised student-teaching experience in a primary classroom (Grades 1 to 3). Students share in the daily work of their co-operating teachers, and progress gradually from being participant observers working with small groups to taking charge of the whole class as independent, creative practitioners. Students perfect their skills in activity planning, intervention strategies, the evaluation of student learning, and the management of classroom routines.

EDUC 494        Primary Teaching Seminar (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization; 60 credits including EDUC 295, 296, 297, 395, 396; EDUC 493 concurrently. The seminar complements EDUC 493 by providing the opportunity, means, and impetus for students to reflect critically on their teaching philosophy and practice. Topics include the development of appropriate and stimulating learning environments, Ministère de l’Éducation et de l’Enseignement supérieur (MEES) primary program guidelines, planning and implementation of curriculum units, teacher-parent relationships, and other current issues in primary education.

EDUC 495        Internship V: Upper Elementary Teaching (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization; 90 credits including EDUC 222, 295, 296, 297, 301, 380, 381, 382, 383, 385, 387, 388, 395, 396, 493, 494; EDUC 496 concurrently. Students are placed in an elementary classroom (Grades 4 to 6) for an eight-week student-teaching experience (200 hours). They are provided with the opportunity to continue to develop their own teaching strategies and enhance their skills in curriculum planning and implementation, preparing and evaluating classroom materials, and monitoring student progress. Students participate in the daily routines and educational duties of their co-operating teachers and become involved in student activities.

EDUC 496        Upper Elementary Teaching Seminar (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education Specialization; 90 credits including EDUC 295, 296, 297, 395, 396, 493, 494; EDUC 495 concurrently. The main focus of EDUC 496 is the discussion, review, and analysis of relevant material in the context of students’ internship placements. Topics include curriculum development and diversity in the classroom population, involvement of parents in their children’s education, Ministère de l’Éducation et de l’Enseignement supérieur (MEES) guidelines, teaching strategies, self-reflection and evaluation.

EDUC 498        Advanced Topics in Education (3 credits)

EDUC 499        Advanced Topics in Education (6 credits)

Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

INFORMATION STUDIES

INST 250          Introductory Information Literacy Skills (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to basic research practices. It familiarizes students with a variety of information sources in both print and non-print formats. Emphasis is placed on developing a systematic search strategy in the use and evaluation of the information sources. Topics such as outlining and bibliographic format are covered as part of the research process.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for EDUC 250 may not take this course for credit.

LIBRARY STUDIES

LIBS 495          Field Practice (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Completion of all other required Library Studies courses. In consultation with the appropriate supervising librarian, the student is placed in a local library system other than the library in which the student is employed. The duration of the field practice is five weeks. Field practice includes a wide variety of library tasks. In addition the student is required to complete a written research project on a topic approved by the professor.



31.090.1     TEACHING OF ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

BEd (Teaching English as a Second Language)

Program

Students are responsible for satisfying their particular degree requirements.
The superscript indicates credit value.

120    BEd Specialization in Teaching English as a Second Language
  60    TESL 2213, 2313, 3266, 3303, 3313, 3413, 3513, 4153, 4266, 4273,
          4663, 4673, 4713, 4866, 4876, 4883
  15    EDUC 2106, 4453, 4503, 4543
  15    ENGL 2123 and 2133, or 3966; any nine ENGL credits in English literature,
          of which three credits must be from Canadian Literature
    6    Credits in a third language other than English or French
  24    Elective credits chosen from a list approved by the Department


Certificate in the Teaching of English as a Second Language

Program
 
   30       Certificate in the Teaching of English as a Second Language
     6       ENGL 2123 and 2133 or 3966
   24       TESL 2213, 2313, 3243, 3313, 3413, 4153, 4243, 4333


Information Relevant to Programs in the Teaching of English as a Second Language

NOTE I: Upon successful completion of the BEd (TESL) program and after application to the Office of the Registrar, a graduate may be recommended to the Quebec Teachers Certification Service for a “Brevet d’enseignement : autorisation personnelle permanente” (a teaching diploma). Graduates who wish to teach ESL in francophone schools, the only schools in Quebec where ESL may be taught, must satisfy the French proficiency requirements of the school board to which they apply.
There is no comparable certification process for teaching ESL at the Cegep level — Collège d’enseignement général et professionnel (junior college) or other adult level.
NOTE II: To be recommended for certification, students must achieve at least a “C” grade in methodology and teaching practice courses: that is, TESL 3266, 3303, 3313, 4266, 4273, 4663, 4673, 4713, 4866, and 4876.
Students who obtain a passing grade that is below the level required for recommendation for certification will be placed on conditional standing within the program and will be so informed in writing by the TESL program director. Students will be allowed to repeat the course(s) in question only once in order to achieve the required grade. (For the status of this grade as part of the student record, see Calendar §16.2.6)
Students who fail to achieve the above minimum grade in two methodology/practice teaching courses (i.e. failing to achieve a grade of “C” in the same methodology/practice teaching course twice or two different methodology/practice teaching courses) will be withdrawn from the Teaching English as a Second Language Specialization program and will also be so informed in writing by the TESL program director (see Calendar §16.2.6).
Students who obtain a failing grade (F, R, or NR) in any of the courses listed above as methodology and practice teaching will be withdrawn from the program and will also be so informed in writing by the TESL program director.
Students must demonstrate proficiency in the language of instruction on an exam recognized by the MEES prior to the start of their third internship.
NOTE III: Upon admission, students may be granted exemptions from courses in TESL programs if they have completed equivalent work at the university level.
Replacement for these exemptions must be made in accordance with the guidelines established by the Department of Education and approved by the University. Copies of these guidelines may be obtained in the Department of Education.
NOTE IV: Students in the TESL Certificate must achieve at least a “C” grade in the Practicum, that is, TESL 433. Students will be allowed to repeat the course in question only once in order to achieve the required grade (see Calendar §16.2.6).


TESL Courses

TESL 201         Introduction to Teaching English as a Second Language (3 credits)
This introductory course provides students with a comprehensive idea of what Teaching English as a Second Language entails. Activities are chosen to expose students to the wide range of possibilities of teaching English in Quebec and around the world. Students are initiated into this much-in-demand profession through project-based activities that require them to apply course concepts and put teaching skills into practice. They also develop skills in exploiting spoken and written texts as resources for language learning.
NOTE: Students currently enrolled in the BEd and Certficate in TESL programs may not take this course for credit.

TESL 221         Phonology for Teachers (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 231 concurrently. The aim of this course is to provide students with a knowledge of the major features of the English sound system, and to prepare them, through practical teaching assignments with ESL students, to apply this knowledge in the language classroom. Contrasts and comparisons are made with French and other languages.

TESL 231         Modern English Grammar (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 221 concurrently. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a current description of the English grammatical system at the text level, to make them aware of grammatical differences between English and French and other major languages, and to alert them to typical grammatical errors made by non-native speakers of English.
NOTE: Students who do not achieve at least a C+ grade in TESL 231 will be placed on conditional standing within the program and will be so informed in writing by the TESL program director. Students will be allowed to repeat this course only once in order to achieve the required grade.

TESL 232         English Grammar (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in Early Childhood and Elementary Education or Art Education (Visual Arts). The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the basic concepts and terminology of grammar in general and English grammar in particular, to examine the grammatical structures of English, to provide students with a coherent framework for analyzing English grammar, and to help students identify and correct their own — and their students’ errors — in written and spoken English.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for TESL 231 may not take this course for credit.

TESL 298         Selected Topics in TESL (3 credits)

TESL 299         Selected Topics in TESL (6 credits)

Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

TESL 324         Methodology I (3 credits)
This course reviews current theory in applied linguistics which relates directly to teaching and learning ESL in the classroom. Techniques and methods appropriate to child, adolescent, and adult learners are discussed and demon­strated. In this course the emphasis is on classroom-oriented techniques and materials related to the teaching of listening and speaking.
NOTE: Students enrolled in the BEd Specialization in Teaching English as a Second Language may not take this course for credit.

TESL 326         TESL Pedagogy: General (6 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 221, 231 previously or concurrently. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the profession of teaching English as a second language to children, adolescents, and adults. Students examine a variety of approaches and methodologies that have been used in the past and how these have contributed to current thinking and practices. They have the opportunity to observe English-language instruction in a variety of settings through visits and video pres­entations. They discuss issues related to lesson planning, audio-visual aids, classroom organization and management techniques. Special attention is paid to the creation of lessons appropriate to adult learners. A minimum of 30 hours is spent observing and assisting in adult ESL classes. Assignments include classroom-based projects.

TESL 330         Computers in Language Learning (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 221, 231, 326. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the uses of the computer in the ESL class. Students acquire knowledge of computer applications for language learning and how to incorporate this knowledge into classroom practice.

TESL 331         Grammar for Teachers (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 231 with a grade of C+ or better. The purpose of this course is to provide students with current approaches, methods, and materials in the teaching of grammar to children, adolescents, and adults of the ESL classroom. Students will be prepared to analyze critically and modify published classroom materials related to the teaching and learning of grammar.

TESL 341         Language Acquisition (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 221, 231 previously or concurrently; or permission of the Department. This course examines sociocultural and psycho-linguistic influences on the acquisition of a first and second language. These issues are examined in relation to the learning and teaching of a second language to children, adolescents, and adult learners.

TESL 351         History of the English Language (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 221, 231 with a grade of C+ or better, or permission of the Department; TESL 415, 427, 467 concurrently. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of the significant changes which have taken place in the English language from Proto-Indo-European to the present. Students consider the evolving nature of English and its role as an international language.

TESL 361         Teaching English for Specific Purposes (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 324, or permission of the Department. This course provides instruction in the teaching of language skills to those who require English either as an auxiliary to their scientific, technical, or professional skills or as a medium for training in these areas.

TESL 398         Selected Topics in TESL (3 credits)

TESL 399         Selected Topics in TESL (6 credits)

Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

TESL 415         Testing, Evaluation and Course Design (3 credits)
Prerequisite: For BEd students: TESL 426 or 427 previously or concurrently; for certificate students: TESL 324 previously or concurrently. The purpose of this course is to prepare students to test and evaluate learners in different types of ESL programs. Students examine syllabi and evaluation systems used in the schools and in adult education settings, and become familiar with placement and proficiency testing materials.

TESL 424         Methodology II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 324. This course continues the presentation of techniques and methods begun in TESL 324. In this course the emphasis is on classroom-oriented techniques and materials related to the teaching of reading and writing.
NOTE: Students enrolled in the BEd Specialization in Teaching English as a Second Language may not take this course for credit.

TESL 426         Pedagogy: Primary (6 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 326; TESL 330, 466, EDUC 210 previously or concurrently. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the principles of TESL pedagogy in regular and intensive ESL primary classrooms. This course emphasizes knowledge of MEES primary-school programs and approved materials. Students learn classroom management techniques, assessment practices, and how to adapt materials to specific primary-school contexts.

TESL 427         Pedagogy: Secondary (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 426, 466; TESL 467 concurrently. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the principles of TESL pedagogy in regular and Language Arts (ESL-LA) ESL secondary classrooms. This course emphasizes knowledge of MEES secondary programs and approved materials. Students learn classroom management techniques, assessment practices, and how to adapt materials to specific secondary-school contexts.

TESL 433         Practicum (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENGL 213; TESL 331, 341, 415, and 424 either previously or concurrently. This course is open only to students enrolled in the TESL Certificate. In this course, students practise techniques which were introduced in their methodology courses. There are opportunities for observation of ESL classes taught by experienced teachers. Techniques presented in TESL 324 and 424 are practised in micro-teaching, peer teaching, and sessions with groups of ESL students. Requirements include lesson planning and the evaluation of one’s own teaching performance.
NOTE I: Students enrolled in the BEd Specialization in Teaching English as a Second Language may not take this course for credit.
NOTE II: Students in the TESL Certificate must achieve at least a “C” grade in this course. Students will be allowed to repeat this course only once in order to achieve the required grade (see Calendar §16.2.6).

TESL 466         Internship: Primary I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 330, 426, EDUC 210, 454 previously or concurrently. The purpose of this course is to apply the principles acquired in TESL 426 to the teaching of ESL to primary-school learners. Students attend on-campus seminars and spend a minimum of 140 hours observing and teaching in a primary school supervised by a co-operating teacher and a university professor.

TESL 467         Internship: Secondary I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 427 concurrently; TESL 466. The purpose of this course is to apply the principles acquired in TESL 427 to the teaching of ESL to secondary-school learners. Students attend on-campus seminars and spend a minimum of 140 hours observing and teaching in a secondary school supervised by a co-operating teacher and a university professor.

TESL 471         Teaching Language Arts: Secondary (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 426, 466; TESL 427 previously or concurrently. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the principles and techniques of teaching comprehension and production skills to advanced secondary learners of ESL. Students are made familiar with current approaches to the teaching of high-level oral interaction skills, reading and writing skills, corrective feedback to writing, and the use of long-term projects and portfolios. The use of authentic English texts such as essays, novels, short stories, poetry, and drama is emphasized.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for TESL 318 or for this topic under a TESL 498 number may not take this course for credit.

TESL 486         Internship: Primary II (6 credits)
Prerequisite: ENGL 212, 213 with a grade of C+ or better; EDUC 200, 450, 454; TESL 330, 331, 341, 415, 426, 466, 471; TESL 487, 488 concurrently. Students must also have completed at least six of the required nine credits in English Literature. The purpose of this course is to further develop the skills required in teaching ESL to primary-school learners. Students teach a minimum of 210 hours supervised by a co-operating teacher and a university professor. In addition, students attend on-campus seminars in which they discuss and reflect upon their experiences in the schools.

TESL 487         Internship: Secondary II (6 credits)
Prerequisite: EDUC 200; TESL 467; TESL 486, 488 concurrently. The purpose of this course is to further develop the skills required in teaching ESL to secondary-school learners. Students teach a minimum of 210 hours supervised by a co-operating teacher and a university professor. In addition, students attend on-campus seminars in which they discuss and reflect upon their experiences in the schools.

TESL 488         Internship Seminar (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TESL 486, 487 concurrently. The purpose of this course is to integrate the knowledge gained during the BEd with the knowledge that students have acquired during practice in the field. Students reflect on and make explicit their own professional and personal development over the course of the four-year program and set goals for future long-term professional development.

TESL 491         Study in a Special Subject (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of the Department. This course provides an opportunity for advanced students to intensify their study beyond the area of specialization already represented by the curriculum. The selected subject varies with the special interest of the instructor conducting the course in any given year.

TESL 492         Study in a Special Subject (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of the Department. A student repeating TESL 491 registers for credits under TESL 492.

TESL 498         Advanced Topics in TESL (3 credits)

TESL 499         Advanced Topics in TESL (6 credits)

Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.


Courses in English as a Second Language — ESL Courses

Courses in English as a Second Language are designed for students who are not native speakers of English and who need further training in the effective use of English in the university setting. Students must be tested for placement in ESL 202 or 204 and 205 or 206. Information about placement testing may be obtained at concordia.ca/artsci/education/programs or from the Department of Education, 1610 St. Catherine St. W., Room: FG 5.150, 514-848-2424, ext. 2031. A fee is charged for the placement test. (See concordia.ca/admissions/tuition-and-fees.)

Written work is required in English for these courses; please consult with the Department.

NOTE: Program students in the Faculty of Arts and Science may take ESL courses for credit, up to a maximum of six credits.

ESL 202            Developing Academic English Language Skills (6 credits)
Prerequisite: Placement by the Concordia Comprehensive ESL Placement Test (ConCEPT). This course helps non-native-speaking students develop the language skills necessary for academic work through an integrated program of grammar, vocabulary, reading, and writing. The coursework enables students to build a wide range of vocabulary and grammatical structures and apply them to essential university tasks such as paraphrasing, expository writing, and processing academic texts.

ESL 204            Refining Academic English Language Skills (6 credits)
Prerequisite: ESL 202 or placement by the Concordia Comprehensive ESL Placement Test (ConCEPT). This course helps non-native-speaking students strengthen their English language skills and apply them to high-level academic tasks such as critical reading, synthesizing, and integrated writing assignments. Attention is paid to analyzing patterns in written English and making appropriate language choices as well as identifying, integrating, and referencing appropriate academic source material.
 
ESL 205            Academic Oral Communication I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Placement by the Concordia Comprehensive ESL Placement Test (ConCEPT). This course helps students develop the oral skills necessary for speaking and listening in an English-speaking academic environment. The focus of the course is the improvement of students’ overall pronunciation skills, including native-like production of English speech at the level of individual sounds, words, and sentences, as well as the development of the listening skills necessary for effective oral communication. This course includes a multimedia language lab component.

ESL 206            Academic Oral Communication II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ESL 205 or placement by the Concordia Comprehensive ESL Placement Test (ConCEPT). This course helps students achieve greater intelligibility and fluency by practising oral communication skills in meaningful discourse, as part of communicative activities and public-speaking assignments. Emphasis is placed on the learning of speech phenomena at the discourse level such as production of native-like stress, rhythm, intonation, and speaking rate. This course includes a multimedia language lab component.

ESL 298            Selected Topics in ESL (3 credits)
Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.


31.090.2     ADULT EDUCATION

Students are responsible for satisfying their particular degree requirements.
The superscript indicates credit value.

30   Certificate in Adult Education
Certificate Admission Requirements
General admission requirements are listed in §13. Applicants will be interviewed prior to admission.

Students must take:
    9    ADED 2013, 2023, 2203
  12    Chosen from the Adult Education (ADED) offerings
    3    Chosen from cognate courses with the permission of the program director
    6    ADED 4963, 4973, Integrative Internships I and II
Students may transfer into the certificate program up to 12 credits earned in an incomplete degree or certificate program or as an Independent student provided they are students in good standing. The credits that may be so transferred are determined by the University at the point of entry into the program.

  24    Minor in Adult Education
    9    ADED 2013, 2023, 2203
  15    Chosen from Adult Education (ADED) course offerings with the prior approval of the Adult Education advisor.


Courses

ADED 201        Concepts and Principles of Adult Education (3 credits)
This course consists of an overview of the field of adult education as a field of study with emphasis given to its philosophy, objectives, historical development, and the nature of adult learners. It also examines adult education as a field of practice with emphasis given to methods, techniques, roles, and competencies. This course stresses active student participation and self-directedness.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for ADED 200 may not take this course for credit.

ADED 202        The Scope and Nature of Adult Education Programs (3 credits)
This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of the scope and nature of adult education programs. Emphasis is placed on existing programs, and institutions and agencies providing them. The course stresses active student participation and self-directedness.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for ADED 200 may not take this course for credit.

ADED 220        Adults as Learners (3 credits)
This course examines the unique physiological, psychological, and sociological characteristics of adults, their influence on adult learning and development, and their implications for educational intervention. Attention is given to changes which occur at various stages of the adult life cycle, and particularly to the dimensions which affect the adult’s self-concept and orientation to learning, the motivations, needs, and interests which cause adults to participate in educational activities.

ADED 230        Roles and Competencies of Adult Educators (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to review the state of professionalization of adult education. General skills, knowledge, and attitudes expected of adult educators regardless of the setting in which they work are examined. In addition, according to the participants’ needs and interests, an opportunity is given to explore competencies related to the particular roles of, e.g., administrators, program developers, trainers, leaders, instructors, counsellors, and volunteer workers.

ADED 240        Introduction to Research in Adult Education (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to how to gain access to and utilize major information sources in adult education. In addition, the course examines research interests and problem areas studied in adult education and related fields, along with current trends and various methods of inquiry used.

ADED 298        Selected Topics in Adult Education (3 credits)

ADED 299        Selected Topics in Adult Education (6 credits)

Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

ADED 302        Group Dynamics (3 credits)
This course examines the processes, conditions, and skills involved when adults work in groups. Participants develop a knowledge and understanding of group dynamics and acquire the skills needed for using groups as a means of adult learning. One of the approaches this course takes is to have participants learn about group dynamics by being actively involved in various interactive group situations.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under ADED 370 may not take this course for credit.

ADED 333        Methods and Techniques for Facilitating Adult Learning (3 credits)
This course is designed to give adult educators an opportunity to practise and improve their skills in facilitating adult learning. Different models of educational processes and optimal conditions for promoting adult learning are examined; attention is given to case studies, role plays, and simulation methods and techniques, as well as to individualized learning formats.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for ADED 330 or 331 may not take this course for credit.

ADED 344        Design of Adult Learning Projects (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to assist participants in developing a clear working concept of various models for planning and designing adult learning projects. To facilitate this understanding, the different steps of the process are closely examined and discussed. Participants are given an opportunity to design and conduct a learning activity in the area of subject matter speciality. A systems approach, including methods for evaluating the design of the learning project is emphasized.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for ADED 340 or 341 or 343 may not take this course for credit.

ADED 345        Evaluating Adult Learning Projects (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to assist participants in developing a clear working concept of various models for assessing the effectiveness of adult learning projects. The course emphasizes a systematic approach to evaluation, techniques for collecting information and providing feedback to program operation and impact. Participants are given the opportunity to conduct an evaluation of an adult learning project in the area of subject matter speciality.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for ADED 342 or 343 may not take this course for credit.

ADED 370        Workshops for Adult Educators (3 credits)
These workshops examine a number of topics and problems related to the field of adult education. The issues considered may differ from year to year and are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule. The workshop format is designed to provide adult educators with learning opportunities that are flexibly scheduled or in the form of a one-week intensive seminar.

ADED 398        Selected Topics in Adult Education (3 credits)
Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

ADED 403        Diversity in Adults (3 credits)
It is the role of adult educators (agents of change) to confront issues of diversity and to challenge the forces of racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, and discrimination. By integrating notions of education, and by reflecting on the roles of practitioners, this course develops strategies to resist structural inequality and oppression.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under an ADED 498 number may not take this course for credit.

ADED 410        Adult Education in Canada and Quebec (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to examine the historical development and current state of adult education in Canada, with special reference to Quebec. Various factors which influenced the development of adult education in our society are explored; the focus is on present status, role and structure, and socio-cultural and philosophical underpinnings of the field.

ADED 412        Concepts and Values in Adult Education (3 credits)
This seminar is designed to encourage adult educators to reflect upon and question what one is engaged in and why. A selection of conceptual and philosophical issues underlying adult educa­tional practice is critically examined and discussed. Attention is given to the meaning of words, the nature of ideas and values, the implications of assumptions and principles which are deemed specific in the sphere of the education of adults.

ADED 440        Issues in the Practice of Adult Education (3 credits)
The purpose of this seminar is to study and discuss current issues relating to the field and profession of adult education in general, along with more specific and local concerns. Group and individual interests have an important bearing on the design of this course.

ADED 496        Integrative Internship I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ADED 201; ADED 202 and 15 credits in the program. This internship is designed to assist individual students in achieving a synthesis of their own experiential learning in light of acquired knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes through the clarification of personal aims and the philosophy of adult education. Students will normally enrol in this internship near the end of their program.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for ADED 495 may not take this course for credit.
NOTE: Students will normally enrol in ADED 496 near the end of their program.

ADED 497        Integrative Internship II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ADED 496. This internship is designed to extend the personal aims and philosophy of adult education arrived at in Integrative Internship I, and engage in a special project in an adult education facility where supervision is provided by the host institution.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for ADED 495 may not take this course for credit.
 
ADED 498        Advanced Topics in Adult Education (3 credits)
Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Back to top

© Concordia University