Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/undergraduate/calendar/current/sec31/31-010.html

Applied Human Sciences

Section 31.010

Please note that the current version of the Undergraduate Calendar is up to date as of February 2017.

Faculty

Chair
PETER MORDEN, PhD University of Waterloo; Associate Professor

Professors
JAMES F. GAVIN, PhD New York University
RAYE KASS, PhD University of Toronto
VARDA MANN-FEDER, DEd McGill University
LISA OSTIGUY, PhD University of Iowa

Associate Professors
NATASHA BLANCHET-COHEN, PhD University of Victoria
JAMES CONKLIN, PhD Concordia University
DONALD W. DE GUERRE, PhD Fielding Graduate University
GILBERT ÉMOND, PhD Université du Québec à Montréal
SHANNON HEBBLETHWAITE, PhD University of Guelph
WARREN LINDS, PhD University of British Columbia
ROSEMARY REILLY, PhD McGill University
HILARY ROSE, PhD University of Georgia
FELICE YUEN, PhD University of Waterloo

Assistant Professors
ELIZABETH FAST, PhD McGill University
DARLA FORTUNE, PhD University of Waterloo
PATTI RANAHAN, PhD University of Victoria

Senior Lecturers
STEVEN HENLE, PhD New York University
ROBERT HOPP, MA University of Iowa

Lecturer
SHAWN WILKINSON, MA McGill University

For the complete list of faculty members, please consult the Department website.


Location

Loyola Campus
7141 Sherbrooke St. W., Room: VE 223
514-848-2424, ext. 3330 or 2260


Department Objectives

The strategic objective of the Department of Applied Human Sciences is to improve quality of life and well-being. This is accomplished through the integration of theory and practice to promote effective practitioner skill. The Department of Applied Human Sciences is an interdisciplinary and applied academic unit which generates knowledge and provides practice-based education in human relations, leisure sciences, therapeutic recreation, human systems intervention, family life education and community service. Involvement in practical contexts beyond the University provides an important link with members of the community, thereby offering a genuine environment for the exchange of knowledge and expertise.


Programs

Students in Human Relations, Leisure Sciences, and Therapeutic Recreation are required to complete the appropriate entrance profiles. The entrance profile is 0.00G for Human Relations; 0.00G for Leisure Sciences; and 3.14G for Therapeutic Recreation.
Students are responsible for satisfying their particular degree requirements.
The superscript indicates credit value.

  60    BA Specialization in Human Relations
  15    AHSC 2203, 2303, 2323, 2603, 2703
  18    AHSC 3113, 3306, 3703, 3803, 3823
    6    Chosen from AHSC 4366 or 4396
    6    Chosen from AHSC 4233 and 4253 or 4433 and 4453
  15    Elective credits, with at least three credits at the 400 level, chosen from AHSC 2253, 3123,
          3133, 3143, 3153, 3163, 3193, 3223, 3353, 4516, 4606, 4653, 4703, 4753

  60    BA Specialization in Leisure Sciences
  12    AHSC 2203, 2303, 2413, 2603
  21    AHSC 3213, 3503, 3613, 3713, 3803, 3823, 3853
    9    AHSC 4273, 4313, 4423
    6    AHSC 4376
  12    Elective credits chosen from either Recreation Programming or Recreation Administration

          Recreation Programming
          With at least three credits at the 400 level, chosen from AHSC 2813, 3103, 3113, 3233, 3333,
          3603, 4213, 4223, 4443, 4503, 4606, 4903, 4913

          Recreation Administration
          With at least three credits at the 300 level, chosen from MANA 2013, 2023, 2983, 2993, 3003,
          3433, 3623

  60    BA Specialization in Therapeutic Recreation
  15    AHSC 2203, 2303, 2413, 2603, 2813
  24    AHSC 3213, 3503, 3613, 3803, 3813, 3823, 3833, 3843
    9    AHSC 4273, 4323, 4503
    9    AHSC 4389
    3    Elective credits chosen from AHSC 3603, 3853, 4223, 4423, 4443

  42    BA Major in Human Relations
  15    AHSC 2203, 2303, 2323, 2603, 2703
    9    AHSC 3113, 3306
    3    AHSC 4353
    3    Chosen from AHSC 4233, 4433
  12    Elective credits, with at least three credits at the 400 level, chosen from AHSC 2253, 3123,
          3133, 3143, 3153, 3163, 3193, 3223, 3353, 4253, 4453, 4516, 4606, 4653, 4703, 4753

  42    BA Major in Leisure Sciences
  12    AHSC 2203, 2303, 2413, 2603
  15    AHSC 3213, 3503, 3613, 3713, 3853
    6    AHSC 4273, 4423
    9    Elective credits, with at least three credits at the 400 level, chosen from AHSC 2813, 3103,
          3113, 3233, 3333, 3603, 4213, 4223, 4443, 4503, 4606
 
  30    Minor in Human Relations
  12    AHSC 2203, 2303, 2323, 2603
    6    AHSC 3306
  12    Elective credits chosen from AHSC 2253, 2703, 3113, 3123, 3133, 3143, 3153, 3163, 3193,
          3223, 3353, 4516, 4606, 4703, 4753


Certificate in Community Service
The Department of Applied Human Sciences offers a 30-credit program leading to the Concordia University Certificate in Community Service. Students may transfer into the certificate program up to 12 credits, as approved by a departmental undergraduate advisor, earned in an incomplete degree or certificate program or as an Independent student provided they are students in good standing. The credits that may be so transferred are determined by the University at the point of entry into the program.

Admission Requirements
Students are required to complete the 0.00G entrance profile to enter the certificate.
Mature Entry students require the prerequisite: ENGL 2123.

     30      Certificate in Community Service
               NOTE: AHSC 2303, 2323, and 2703 are prerequisites for courses included in this certificate.
               Phase I
       6      AHSC 2603, 3703
               Phase II
       9      AHSC 3153, 3306
               Phase III
       6      Chosen from AHSC 4233 and 4253 or 4433 and 4453 or 4606
       9      Elective credits chosen from AHSC 2203, 2253, 3113, 3143, 3163, 3193, 3353
NOTE: In the event that a student is awarded an exemption from a required course, it will be necessary for the student to replace that course with another relevant to the program, chosen in consultation with the coordinator of undergraduate programs.


Certificate in Family Life Education
The Department of Applied Human Sciences offers a 30-credit program leading to the Concordia University Certificate in Family Life Education. Students may transfer into the certificate program up to 12 credits, as approved by a departmental undergraduate advisor, earned in an incomplete degree or certificate program or as an Independent student provided they are students in good standing. The credits that may be so transferred are determined by the University at the point of entry into the program.

Admission Requirements
Students are required to complete the 0.00G entrance profile to enter the certificate.
Mature Entry students require the prerequisite: ENGL 2123.

     30      Certificate in Family Life Education
               NOTE: AHSC 2203, 2303, and 2323 are prerequisites for courses included in this certificate.
               Phase I
     12      AHSC 2603, 3123, 3133, 3553
               Phase II
       6      AHSC 3306
               Phase III
       3      AHSC 4353
       9      Elective credits chosen from AHSC 2253, 2703, 3113, 3143, 3153, 3163, 3193, 3353, 3603, 4606
NOTE: In the event that a student is awarded an exemption from a required course, it will be necessary for the student to replace that course with another relevant to the program, chosen in consultation with the coordinator of undergraduate programs.


Courses

AHSC 220        Lifespan Growth and Development for Practitioners (3 credits)
This survey course provides an interdisciplinary overview of biopsychosocial patterns of development over the lifespan, from conception to death. Students learn about theories of human development, with an emphasis on typical normative development, and on application of theory to practice. The course material covers key issues in development, major milestones of development, and major life events.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for PSYC 230 may not take this course for credit.
NOTE: Students registered in a Psychology program may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 223        Relationships Across the Lifespan (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide a theoretical overview of how relationships are formed, sustained, and developed/changed in each stage of human life. A variety of theories and perspectives are explored.
NOTE: AHSC students may not take this course for credit.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 220 or for this topic under an AHSC 298 number may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 225        Self-Managed Learning (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Fewer than 30 university credits. This course fosters effectiveness in orienting and directing learning which is precipitated by new personal interests and goals and/or by changing personal circumstances. It enables students to create clear personal visions, set relevant learning goals, create and organize related activities, and assess their progress. The course provides learning process models and ways to identify personal stylistic differences which affect personal learning progress and strategies.

AHSC 230        Interpersonal Communication and Relationships (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide knowledge and skill in building and maintaining interpersonal relationships characterized by mutual understanding and respect. Students can expect to enhance their understanding of themselves and their personal styles. The course focuses on effective communication behaviour. Students can expect to improve their abilities to attend to verbal and non-verbal communication; exchange constructive feedback with others; address and deal constructively with conflict; and communicate across differences, such as gender and race. Conceptual perspectives include the contextual influences in relationship dynamics and the role of affect in interpersonal communication. The course also examines value considerations.

AHSC 232        Working in Task Groups (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 230. This course is an introduction to understanding interaction and developmental processes of small groups and skill-building for effective participation. It enables students to learn frameworks for observing a group’s process, member roles that facilitate positive group processes and task accomplishment, and models of intervention in small groups. The course provides opportunities for students to integrate the theory they learn with their experiences in a task group.

AHSC 241        Recreation and Leisure in Contemporary Society (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the theories and relationships of play, perceptions of free and discretionary time, concepts of leisure, and the historical foundations for the discipline. The concepts are presented as integral components of today’s lifestyle. In addition, the organized recreation system is examined, with an introduction to the leisure services delivery system. The students also examine the role that leisure plays in current societal issues.

AHSC 260        Program Planning, Design and Evaluation (3 credits)
The course prepares students to construct effective interactive programs designed for specific client populations. Using program design principles and practices, students match learning activities to desired program outcomes, while considering participant qualities and contextual features. Emphasis is placed on assessment, design, and evaluation knowledge and skills.

AHSC 270        Introduction to Intervention in Human Systems (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to theory of human systems change from an interventionist perspective. It overviews general strategies of human systems intervention and salient models of practice highlighting conditions under which different intervention strategies are most effective. It especially focuses on the principles of fostering participation, collaborative inquiry, process facilitation and consultation, experiential learning, and action research. The course also features attention to values and ethical issues associated with specific strategies.

AHSC 281        Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation (3 credits)
An examination of the fundamental concepts of therapeutic recreation. Included is the study of the historical foundations and the basic terminology, purposes, and theories of therapeutic recreation.

AHSC 298        Selected Topics in Applied Human Sciences (3 credits)
Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

AHSC 310        Tourism in Canada (3 credits)
This course presents an examination of the tourism industry in Canada, including concepts, research, practices, and promotion. Topics covered include destination motivation, commercial recreation, business travel, trends in tourism development, government agencies, the economics of promotion, social objectives, market segmentation, and ethical and legal considerations.

AHSC 311        Respecting Diversity in Human Relations (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits including AHSC 230. This course examines theories of diversity and difference, as well as the effects of biases, stereotypes and stigmatization in personal interactions, institutional practices, and socio-cultural norms. It considers the role of identity-related issues such as age, culture, disability, ethnicity, gender, geographical location, health status, history, language, power, race, religion, sexual orientation, and social class in human relationships and systems.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 245 may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 312        Sexuality in Human Relations (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits including AHSC 220, 230. This course provides students with knowledge of physical and psychosocial aspects of sexuality in relationships through life and examines values, attitudes, and issues related to the development and expression of sexuality. Topics include gender, family, cultural and media influences; historically and culturally based attitudes; prevention and sexually transmitted diseases; self-perception and identity in sexuality; and emotion and sexuality. The course aims to foster respect for persons and diversity.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 253 may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 313        Family Communication (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 220, AHSC 230. This course is a requirement for students enrolled in the Certificate in Family Life Education. This course is an examination of patterns, effective approaches, and issues in communication among persons in primary partnerships and families. It also explores topics such as diversity in forms of “family,” decision-making, problem-solving, power relations, gender issues, managing differences in expectations, and the influences of cultural, social, and economic contexts.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 254 may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 314        Adolescence: Issues and Intervention (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 220. This course links knowledge of adolescent development to a more detailed examination of related adolescent patterns and issues, including peer relations and friendship, parental and family relations, identity, sexuality and gender, and socio-economic and cultural influences. Directed towards students interested in working with adolescents, the course combines theoretical and practical knowledge relating to adolescents, their parents and their concerns for the purpose of enhancing the adolescent experience.

AHSC 315        Interviewing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 230. This course reviews different forms and concepts relevant to interviewing for use in work and community settings. It examines communication influences on the interviewer and interviewee and the limitations of different interview approaches. It enables students to structure and design interviews, to build rapport, and to manage information flow.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 256 may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 316        Adulthood: Patterns and Transitions (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 220. This course examines relationships, transitions, and developmental change through early adulthood and middle age. Relevant adult development theories are reviewed. Students explore the nature and significance of close relationships, life transitions, choices and contextual influences. This course includes a consideration of the societal values inherent in notions of maturity, optimal environments, and interventions to enhance quality of life.

AHSC 319        Older Adulthood: Issues and Intervention (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 220. This course explores developmental change patterns and differences among people in older adulthood. Topics include retirement and pensions, concepts of health, fitness, well-being and models of health care, housing and transportation, leisure, family and social relations, ethnicity and aging, loss and grief, death and dying. Designed for persons interested in working with older adults, the course fosters awareness of myths, stereotypes and ageism, and emphasizes an attention to community social support and interventions which are enabling.

AHSC 320        Family and Youth Legislation (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 220. This course reviews all aspects of federal and provincial legislation that impact on practice with families. Legislation governing marriage, divorce and custody, family violence, child and youth protection and placement, youth crime, child advocacy and the challenges of working with families in relation to the legislation, are presented with a particular focus on the rights of children and the legal responsibilities of practitioners.

AHSC 321        Historical Foundations of Leisure and Recreation (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 241. This course offers an overview of leisure and recreation throughout history, highlighting selected major trends among different historical eras. This includes the historical and philosophical roots of leisure, the conditions in society that have affected leisure, the responses to those conditions, and the role of leisure in contemporary life. This course offers an opportunity to analyze the values, beliefs and ethics relating to leisure that shape modern traditions and cultures.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 215, HIST 215, PHIL 255 or for this topic under an AHSC 298 number may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 322        Fundamentals of Child- and Youth-Care Work (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 220. The objectives of this course are to provide students with an understanding of the scope and status of child- and youth-care work, to sensitize them to the necessary competencies and daily challenges of this work in a range of settings, and to review relevant theory. An overview of the history of the field is provided, as well as a review of seminal writings and recent literature on best practices.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 402 or for this topic under an AHSC 398 number may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 323        Gender and Leisure (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits including AHSC 241 or 242. This course focuses on theory and empirical research concerning the relationships between gender and leisure. This includes topics such as the effect of gender on leisure meanings, constraints to leisure, and participation in leisure. In addition, this course explores the cultural influences of leisure related to gender identity and gender relations. As part of this, the course explores the role that leisure plays as a significant site for the social construction and contestation of gender. Emphasis is placed on understanding ways in which gender relations and gender role expectations affect and are affected by leisure.

AHSC 330        Leadership in Small Groups (6 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 232, 260. This course develops facilitative skills and approaches to leadership in small groups. Students learn effective ways to observe and to interpret the significance of group behaviour for the purpose of intervening effectively. The course highlights factors optimizing participation, patterns of communication and influence, decision-making, problem-solving, collaborative planning, conflict management, and effects of gender and other identity-related differences. Students identify their leadership styles and group facilitation skills to develop flexibility in adapting to diverse group situations.

AHSC 333        Leisure and the Environment (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits including AHSC 241 or 242. This course examines the state of the natural environment, and explains how leisure service providers play a crucial leadership role in fulfilling the needs of both the public and the environment.

AHSC 335        Power and Conflict Resolution in Human Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits. This course gives students a theoretical and practical overview of the role of power and conflict in human relationships and human systems — groups, organizations, and communities. The concept of power is explored in depth since the use of power is central in both the creation and the resolution of conflict. The course focuses on the development of analytical tools that serve to identify the different elements leading to, maintaining or escalating conflicts. Particular attention is given to ethics associated with the use of power and management of conflict.

AHSC 350        Leisure Education (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 241, 260. This course offers an introduction to the field of leisure education. The history and underlying philosophy of the concept is presented. The roles of the school, community, and community-serving agencies are examined. Existing models are analyzed and discussed.

AHSC 355        Foundations of Family Life Education (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 232, 260, 313. This course examines Family Life Education from its inception as a field of practice to its current status in North America. It highlights complex related issues and the role of the educator, including attention to personal values and ethical principles of the practitioner. Topics include distinctions between prevention education and therapeutic intervention, and an overview of the range of different family life education programs and current practices.

AHSC 360        Play, Adult Learning and Development (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits including AHSC 220. This course examines the concept of play in adult learning and development. Gender, age, ethnic and social class diversity are explored as they relate to adult play behaviour.

AHSC 361        Leisure Services Leadership (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 230, 241. This course offers an analysis of leadership theory and its application to leisure services. Major topics are the principles and practices of leadership, group dynamics, leadership skill development and program planning, and the unique role of the leisure leader.

AHSC 370        Principles and Practices of Human Systems Intervention (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 270. This course is about the theory and practice of human system intervention. It emphasizes collaborative strategies for effecting change in human systems within a broad range of intervention alternatives. It focuses on the interventionist’s role in effective change strategy development, initiation, management, and evaluation. The course is taught with a special focus on personal and professional values and ethical issues related to human systems intervention.

AHSC 371        Community Recreation Planning (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 241, 260. The course focuses on the application of recreation planning, theory, and skills. It examines methods and procedures used to assess client needs, design and deliver programs and services, and evaluate their impact. Practical experience is gained through a combination of field experience, project planning, and group work.

AHSC 380        Quantitative Research Methods for Practitioners (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits including AHSC 260. This course gives an overview of a range of data collection and analysis strategies which are relevant to collaborative and participative intervention practice. It examines practical considerations for selecting specific quantitative approaches and prepares students to formulate and administer intervention-related questionnaires, to conduct basic quantitative analyses, and to present data results to interested individuals and groups. The course also examines basic ethical requirements in conducting applied social research.

AHSC 381        Concepts in Therapeutic Recreation Programming (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 241, 260, 281. This course explores current therapeutic recreation practices with emphasis on rehabilitation in community and clinical settings such as hospitals, group homes, psychiatric centres, rehabilitation clinics, and correctional centres. Leisure planning and assessment models are studied to identify the modes of recreational activity which may be used as an intervention.

AHSC 382        Qualitative Research Methods for Practitioners (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits including AHSC 260. This course gives an overview of a range of qualitative approaches to practical projects and interventions.It prepares students to design and conduct interviews (including making decisions about respondent selection) with individuals and in focus groups, as well as participant observation. It also enables students to analyze qualitative data from these sources as well as documentary sources in light of practical project purposes. The course highlights special ethical considerations in conducting qualitative forms of applied social research.

AHSC 383        Therapeutic Recreation and Physical Disabilities (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 220, 281. This course gives an overview of the role and impact of therapeutic recreation services for individuals with physical disabilities and limitations. It analyzes the bar­riers to recreation participation along with the planning and designing of a safe and accessible recreational environment.

AHSC 384        Therapeutic Recreation: Cognitive Disabilities and Illness (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 220, 281. This course gives an overview of the role of therapeutic recreation services for individuals with cognitive disabilities and limitations or illness. It focuses on the etiology, impact, and barriers related to specific conditions. It also studies legislation trends and resources for community recreation integration and the role of transitional programs.

AHSC 385        Social Psychology of Leisure (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits including AHSC 241. This course deepens students’ understanding of how personal and social factors shape individuals’ perceptions and experiences of recreation and leisure. Students engage in a critical review of current theory and research focusing on the relationship between leisure and individual functioning, and applications to human problems associated with leisure.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 285, PSYC 286 or for this topic under an AHSC 298 number may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 398        Selected Topics in Applied Human Sciences (3 credits)

AHSC 399        Selected Topics in Applied Human Sciences (6 credits)

Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

AHSC 421        Political and Legal Aspects of Leisure Services (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits including AHSC 241. This course provides students with a theoretical understanding of the complexity of providing leisure services in the province of Quebec. The course examines the administration of leisure services in municipal, regional, provincial, and federal governments. The course examines law as it applies to aspects of recreational activities in the areas of organization, supervision, and participation. The course covers the Quebec Civil Code, the Canadian Constitution, and the Quebec and Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms as they apply to the study of leisure.

AHSC 422        Youth and Leisure (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits including AHSC 220, 241, 260. This course develops an understanding of the leisure needs of youth from emotional, physical, psychological, and sociological perspectives. Major areas of discussion include leisure preferences and needs assessment, strategies for programming, dealing with youth-at-risk, and recreational opportunities for youth. Lectures and laboratory.

AHSC 423        Organization Development I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 270, 330. This course introduces students to the characteristics of organizations as open systems. The evolution of organization development and the principle theories and perspectives that have helped to define the field are studied. Organization development methods as well as criteria for examining organizational effectiveness, underlying beliefs, values, and assumptions are examined. Key concepts covered are organization vision, mission and goals, and organization norms and culture.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 420 may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 425        Organization Development II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 423. This course provides students with the opportunity to apply organization development concepts and strategies to effect change in organizations. Using theoretical, case, and experiential approaches, the focus of instruction progressively guides the student through the stages of organization development. Concepts covered include entry and contracting, identifying organizational issues and goals for change, collecting and analyzing pertinent organizational data, and diagnosis and feedback to the client. Opportunities for the development of change-agent skills are provided through the emphasis on in-class applications.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 420 may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 427        Administration of Leisure Services (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 60 university credits including AHSC 361; AHSC 371 or 381. This course offers an analysis of the processes involved in planning and managing leisure service delivery systems. Topics to be studied include principles of planning, organization, budgeting, and supervision.

AHSC 431        Leisure Sciences Seminar (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 60 university credits including AHSC 321, 361, 371, 385. This is a third-year interdisciplinary seminar in which students can tie together all they have learned in the Leisure Sciences program. Additionally, students are set on a course of study that should continue after they graduate so that they can keep up with future developments in this area.

AHSC 432        Seminar in Therapeutic Recreation (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 60 university credits including AHSC 321, 361, 381, 383, 384. This is a third-year interdisciplinary seminar in which students can tie together all that they have learned in the Therapeutic Recreation program. Additionally, students are set on a course of study that should continue after they graduate so that they can keep up with future developments in this area.

AHSC 435        Fieldwork Practice (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 330. This course must be taken in final year. This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate theory into practice in the design, facilitation and evaluation of small group process. Students lead one small task or learning group in a community, an organizational or an institutional setting. The fieldwork is combined with class sessions for orientation, supervision, reflection and evaluation.

AHSC 436        Internship in Youth and Family Work (6 credits)
Prerequisite: 60 university credits including AHSC 330, 370; AHSC 423 and 425 or 443 and 445; AHSC 322 and 465 previously or concurrently; permission of the Department. This course is one of two internship options for students enrolled in the Specialization in Human Relations. This internship provides students with a supervised opportunity to apply learning from the BA Specialization in Human Relations to work with youth and families in a range of settings such as child welfare, schools, non-profit organizations, residential care, or outreach. The specific objectives are to teach about planning, education, and intervention in human service work, to promote self-reflection as a critical component of ethical practice, and to provide a basis for further career planning and/or graduate work in youth and family practice.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 439 or for this topic under an AHSC 499 number may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 437        Internship in Leisure Sciences (6 credits)
Prerequisite: 60 university credits including AHSC 361, 371; permission of the Department. This course provides students with an opportunity to design, implement, and evaluate programs; to facilitate groups in a variety of settings; and to establish working relationships with field personnel. In consultation with their supervisors, students select a site related to their learning interests. Students learn to develop and manage their own project and to self-assess their work. The course includes fieldwork, seminars, and team meetings.

AHSC 438        Internship in Therapeutic Recreation (9 credits)
Prerequisite: 60 university credits including AHSC 361, 381, 383, 384; permission of the Department. This course provides students with an opportunity to design, implement, and evaluate programs, to facilitate groups in a variety of settings, and to establish working relationships with field personnel. In consultation with their supervisors, students select a site related to their learning interests. Students learn to develop and manage their own project and to self-assess their work. The course includes fieldwork, seminars, and team meetings.

AHSC 439        Internship in Human Relations (6 credits)
Prerequisite: 60 university credits including AHSC 330, 370; AHSC 423 and 425 or 443 and 445 previously or concurrently; permission of the Department. This course is one of two internship options for students enrolled in the Specialization in Human Relations. This course provides students with an opportunity to design, implement, and evaluate small group leadership in several settings, and to negotiate working relationships with site personnel. Students will be solely responsible for facilitating several task or learning groups in community, work, or educational settings. The sites will be selected according to students’ learning interests and in consultation with the course instructor. The course includes supervisory team meetings and internship seminar sessions.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 436 or for this topic under an AHSC 499 number may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 442        Community Development and Leisure (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits including AHSC 361; 371 or 381. This course involves the examination of philosophical and theoretical community development approaches in the field of leisure studies. Students explore the numerous elements of community development practice including citizen engagement, relationship building, and community capacity. Students develop their understanding of current trends in community development and critically examine its implications for practice in the context of leisure.

AHSC 443        Community Development I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 270, 330. This course examines the field of community development through the presentation of basic models. The examination of these models in historical and environmental contexts focuses on understanding how they reflect different views of social relationships. Students explore different approaches to working with communities and the implications for practice. They also examine ways of analyzing and defining community resources, problems, and issues.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 440 may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 444        The Older Adult and Leisure (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits including AHSC 220, 241, 260. This course examines the aging process in the physical, cognitive, and affective domains. It familiarizes the student with the characteristics of the aging population as related to leisure, recreation, and lifestyle. It focuses on developing and understanding the impact of lifelong leisure in the aging process. The course reviews issues related to the phenomenon of leisure in retirement and discusses the process of delivering leisure services to older individuals.

AHSC 445        Community Development II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 443. This course focuses on how to intervene in community contexts; identify community structures and inter-group dynamics relevant to intervention planning; gather and organize data for use by communities; develop intervention plans that involve the community each step of the way and that foster leadership within its ranks; and evaluate an intervention. Attention is given to cultural diversity and value differences.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 440 may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 450        Leisure Assessment and Counselling (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits including AHSC 281. This course focuses on the use of assessment applied to individual leisure abilities, interests and needs, and the application of counselling theory to the field of leisure services. A variety of assessment tools are analyzed/interpreted. Theories, models, and methods of leisure counselling are discussed.

AHSC 451        Counselling Skills and Concepts (6 credits)
Prerequisite: 45 university credits including AHSC 220, 230. This course advances students’ understanding of core counselling theories and develops an understanding for theoretical and value frameworks of the helping relationship. It fosters the application of essential helping relationship skills applicable in everyday relationships in work and social settings. Skill areas include attending skills, such as attending to non-verbal behaviour, reflection of content, reflection of feeling, paraphrasing and summarizing; and influencing skills, such as interpretation and analysis. Also highlighted are ethical issues and attention to cultural differences.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 351 may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 456        Advanced Family Life Education (3 credits)
Prerequisite: AHSC 355. This course covers advanced professional skills of family life education with a focus on ethics, professionalism, and certification. Topics include group dynamics, communication skills, and effective leadership. There is a required fieldwork component to include one hour per week of observation in a family life education setting.

AHSC 460        Health Promotion (6 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits including AHSC 230. This course helps students to develop intervention skills and theoretical understanding in the area of health promotion. It is of particular interest to students whose career interests involve lifestyle planning, health promotion, and stress management. Topics include health and wellness, stress and illness, psychological and physical self-appraisal processes, psychosomatic processes and disorders, understanding addictions and their management, health-promotion interventions, behavioural self-management, and issues in medical/psychological health compliance.

AHSC 465        Parent-Child Relations (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 45 university credits including AHSC 232, 313, 380. This course provides an advanced understanding of parenting theories, research, and applications in the context of parent-child relations over the life span. Topics include parenting rights and responsibilities, parenting practices and programs, high-risk parenting, and parental assessment.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for this topic under an AHSC 498 number may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 470        Basic Human Relations Laboratory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 60 university credits including AHSC 330. This is an intensive format six-day learning session through which students may expect to increase their awareness of how their behaviour affects others, increase their skill and understanding of effectively and responsibly communicating to and exchanging feedback with others, increase their understanding of leadership and authority relations, and deepen their understanding of group dynamics.

AHSC 475        Organizational Leadership: A Human Systems Approach (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 45 university credits including AHSC 232, 270. This course deepens students’ understanding of the practice and application of leadership in organizations with a human systems approach and perspective. The course examines a range of theoretical concepts current in organizational leadership practice including systems thinking, team-based leadership, and strategy formulation from a leadership perspective. It provides an opportunity for students to examine ethics, values, and abilities required in organizational leadership today.
NOTE: Students who have received credit for AHSC 375 may not take this course for credit.

AHSC 480        Internship in Family Relations (6 credits)
Prerequisite: 60 university credits including AHSC 456 and 465; permission of the Department. This 360-hour internship must be completed over two terms and involves a supervised placement implementing family life education programs in a wide range of settings such as community organizations, education, and health care. Students are responsible for developing, implementing, and evaluating a number of lesson plans and programs, and are supervised and evaluated by an on-site field supervisor.

AHSC 490        Independent Study I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits; permission of the Department. Students work on topics in consultation with a study supervisor. The study may include readings, field studies, and/or research.

AHSC 491        Independent Study II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 30 university credits; permission of the Department. A student who has received credit for AHSC 490 may register for AHSC 491.

AHSC 498        Advanced Topics in Applied Human Sciences (3 credits)

AHSC 499        Advanced Topics in Applied Human Sciences (6 credits)

Specific topics for these courses, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

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