Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/undergraduate/calendar/current/sec16/16.html

Academic Information: Definitions and Regulations

Section 16

Please note that the current version of the Undergraduate Calendar is up to date as of February 2017.

University Registrar
DANIEL THERRIEN

Associate Registrar
ILZE KRAULIS

Director, Student Recruitment
MATT STIEGEMEYER

Director, Admissions
SOPHIE FONTAINE

Director, Administration and Services to Students
TANYA POLETTI

Manager, Government Reporting and Statistics
MARIE‑CLAIRE NEWMAN

Manager, Birks Student Service Centre
LORRAINE TOSCANO

Manager, Course Registration, Examinations and Academic Scheduling
NICOLAS TZOUTIS


16.1     General Information

The Calendar is an official University document defining academic programs and the regulations that pertain to them. It is accurate as of its publication date. The University Senate reserves the right to modify the academic programs and regulations at its discretion after the publication date of the Calendar. In addition, the University reserves the right to modify the published scale of tuition and other student fees at any time before the beginning of an academic term. The most current information is available from the Office of the Registrar and, for graduate programs, from the School of Graduate Studies. Moreover, the information contained in the Calendar or any other University document related to academic programs and regulations is subject to verification and correction by the Office of the Registrar and the School of Graduate Studies.
The regulations contained in this section apply to all students at the undergraduate level, whether they are enrolled in degree, certificate, or Qualifying programs or registered as Visiting or Independent students, with the following exceptions:

  1. Degree, certificate, and Qualifying program requirements are determined by those in effect in the year of the student’s admission. (See §16.2)
  2. Regulations concerning residence requirements and academic performance are also governed by those in effect in the year of a student’s admission.
  3. Determination of high academic achievement is governed by the most recent regulation in effect.

Regulations for graduate students can be found online at concordia.ca/academics/graduate/calendar/current.
Students who were admitted or readmitted prior to the current academic year should consult the appropriate Calendar and the Office of the Registrar or, for graduate programs, the School of Graduate Studies, for information on the regulations appropriate to the academic year in which the student was admitted or readmitted.
Specific written permission must be obtained from the appropriate authority for exemption from any academic regulation.
Students must have a valid ID card to access certain services.


16.1.1     Academic Year

The academic year is defined by the year in which it begins and the year in which it ends, i.e. 2017‑18. It begins with a summer session (May to August) followed by a regular session (September to April).

Summer Session:
The summer session includes all courses offered between the beginning of May and the end of August.

Regular Session:
The regular session is divided into a fall term (September – December) and a winter term (January – April). Each term is 15 weeks long and includes an examination period, during which any final examination must be held. The Academic Calendar §11 lists precise dates for the beginning and end of classes and examination periods.


16.1.2     Credit System

Student academic activity is measured according to the credit system. Each credit represents a minimum of 45 hours of academic activity, including lectures, tutorials, laboratories, studio or practice periods, examinations, and personal work.

I. FULL‑ AND PART‑TIME STATUS

A student’s status is determined by the number of credits for which she or he is registered at the close of the tuition refund period, in the following way:

  Full-Time* Part-Time
Registration for both fall and winter terms 24 credits or more Fewer than 24 credits
Registration for fall term only 12 credits or more Fewer than 12 credits
Registration for winter term only 12 credits or more Fewer than 12 credits
Registration for the summer session 12 credits Fewer than 12 credits

*NOTE: According to the rules established by the Government of Quebec, students receiving Quebec loans and bursaries must maintain registration of 12 credits or more each term. For further information, see Financial Aid §18.6.1. For Quebec residency purposes, full‑time and part‑time are defined on a per‑term basis. Courses with DISC notation are included in the calculation. For further information, see Proof of Quebec Residency §13.7.

II. CREDIT LOADS

Regular Session ─ Full‑Time Status
Full‑time students normally take 30 credits in each regular session. They may register for a maximum of 15 credits in each of the fall and winter terms. Engineering programs may require more than 30 credits. For information on Engineering credit loads, see §71.

Regular Session ─ Part‑Time Status
Part‑time students in all Faculties may register for a maximum of nine credits in each of the fall and winter terms.

Regular Session ─ Independent Status
Independent students may normally register for a maximum of nine credits in each of the fall and winter terms.

Summer Session
Any student, other than one in the Institute for Co‑operative Education (§24) or the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science (§71), may register for a maximum of 12 credits during the summer session.


16.1.3     Registration for Courses

Students select courses for each session (summer session and fall and winter terms in the regular session) prior to the start of classes.

  • All newly admitted students will receive advising and registration information in the offer of admission letter.
  • New Independent students can obtain registration information in the Student Academic Services of the Faculty whose discipline interests them and online at concordia.ca/admissions/independent-students.
  • New Visiting students can obtain registration information in the online Registration Guide at concordia.ca/students/registration.
  • Returning students in good standing can obtain registration information at myconcordia.ca.

Most students will be able to register for all their courses online at MyConcordia.ca > My Student Centre > Enroll.


16.1.4     Cancellation of Classes

If no class cancellation notice is posted on the classroom door, classes are officially considered cancelled if an instructor is 15 minutes late for a 50‑minute class, 20 minutes late for a 75‑minute class, or 30 minutes late for longer classes.


16.1.5     Withdrawal

1.       The Student’s Responsibilities
It is the student’s responsibility to meet all deadlines and follow all necessary steps to withdraw from a course or courses, or from the University. Not attending classes or informing an instructor of intent to withdraw does not constitute withdrawal. Instructors are not required to provide students with any evaluation or feedback of their progress in a course before the withdrawal deadline. Students who do not properly withdraw before the published deadlines, and who do not complete assigned work, tests or exams, will receive failing grades.

2.       Withdrawal from a Course or Courses
There are two different types of course withdrawal:

  1. DNE (Did Not Enter)
    The DNE withdrawal has no academic or financial impact on the student. The course from which the student officially withdraws prior to the DNE deadline will be removed from the student record and official transcript and no fees will be charged for that course. The DNE deadline is usually within the first two weeks of the fall and winter terms and within the first week of the summer session. For exact dates, please refer to point 4. Withdrawal Deadlines.
  2. DISC (Discontinued)
    The DISC withdrawal has both academic and financial impact on the student. For the course from which the student officially withdraws between the DNE and DISC deadlines, the DISC withdrawal notation remains on a student record and official transcript, but does not affect the student’s GPA. Nevertheless, the student is financially responsible for the payment of all tuition and other fees pertaining to the course. The DISC deadline is usually after the eighth week of classes of the term for fall and winter terms and within the first five weeks for the summer session. For exact dates, please refer to point 4. Withdrawal Deadlines.

Students who wish to withdraw (DNE or DISC) from a course or courses must do so online at MyConcordia.ca > My Student Centre > Enroll > Drop.
When dropping courses online, students must make sure to confirm the transaction and/or verify their registration record to make sure that the course was properly dropped.

3.       Withdrawal from the University
Students who wish to withdraw from the University must:

  1. Withdraw from their courses by the appropriate deadline (see §11 Academic Calendar) online at MyConcordia.ca > My Student Centre > Enroll > Drop.

and

  1. Notify the Office of the Registrar in writing, by:
    1. Registered letter addressed to:
      Office of the Registrar
      Records Office
      Room S-LB 700
      1455 De Maisonneuve Blvd. W.
      Montreal, Quebec  H3G 1M8
      The student’s full name and Concordia student ID number must be clearly legible, and the letter must be signed by the student.
      or
    2. A signed fax sent to 514-848-2621. The student’s full name and Concordia student ID number must be clearly legible, and the fax must be signed by the student.

Withdrawal from the University does not withdraw a student from his or her courses. A student enrolled at the University who wishes to withdraw from it must also withdraw from his or her courses.
Correspondence for course withdrawal must be received by the deadline dates (see §11 Academic Calendar).

4.       Withdrawal Deadlines
Withdrawal deadlines are published online at concordia.ca/students/registration/term-dates-deadlines.
All financial regulations pertaining to course withdrawals, and refunds or financial credit for fees, are available online at:


5.       Lapsed Program Status
Students in the Faculty of Arts and Science who have been absent from their program for nine consecutive terms or more will be withdrawn from their program and must meet with an academic advisor before reinstatement into the program.
Students in the John Molson School of Business who have been absent from their program for six consecutive terms or more will be withdrawn from their program and must meet with an academic advisor before reinstatement into the program.
Students in the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science who have been absent from their program for six consecutive terms or more will be withdrawn from their program and must submit a new application for admission through the Admissions Application Centre.
Students in the Faculty of Fine Arts who have been absent from their program for nine consecutive terms or more will be withdrawn from their program and must meet with an academic advisor before reinstatement into the program.


16.1.6     Studies at Other Universities

With the following exceptions, students who wish to take courses at other universities for transfer credit (for example, in the summer) must obtain permission in advance from their Faculty Student Request Committee. Students who study at other universities should familiarize themselves with Concordia’s Residence Requirements (see §16.2.2).

1. Interuniversity Registration within Quebec: The student must be authorized by his or her academic advisor, Associate Dean or delegate, and the University Registrar. General information can be found at the site of the Bureau de Coopération Interuniversitaire: mobilite-cours.crepuq.qc.ca/4DSTATIC/ENAccueil. Specific instructions can be had by contacting the Student Academic Services in each Faculty.

2. Concordia Student Exchange Program and Internships Abroad: Authorization varies by Faculty. Specifics can be found at concordia.ca/students/exchanges/csep.


16.1.7     Student Request Committees

  1. Student Request Committees consider applications from students for exceptions to academic regulations or related matters, such as permission for course overloads, registration or withdrawals after the deadline, course substitutions, exceptions to residence requirements, permission to take courses at other universities, and exceptions to the rules governing the refund of tuition and other fees.
  2. A student request shall be made on a Student Request form available online through the student portal: MyConcordia Menu > Student Administrative Affairs > UG Student Requests. The completed request form, student statement, and all supporting documentation should be submitted as follows:
    • Students registered in a Faculty of Arts and Science program must submit to the academic department housing the program in which they are registered;
    • Students registered in a Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science program must submit to the Faculty Student Academic Services Office;
    • Students registered in a Faculty of Fine Arts program must submit to the Faculty Undergraduate Student Academic Services Office;
    • Students registered in a John Molson School of Business program must submit to the Faculty Undergraduate Programs Office;
    • Independent students must submit to the Birks Student Service Centre.
    Requests for refunds of fees will not be considered unless the student has officially withdrawn from the course(s) in question (DISC).
    Requests based on medical grounds must be supported by a Student Request Medical Certificate duly completed by a registered medical practitioner. The Medical Certificate form is available online through the student portal: MyConcordia Menu > Student Administrative Affairs > UG Student Requests.
  3. A student request shall be made within a reasonable period of time from the circumstances giving rise to the request. Normally, the following guidelines apply:
      A request with respect to a: must be submitted by:
      Summer-session course (session ending in 1) November 1
      Fall-term course (term ending in 2) March 1
      Fall/Winter course (term ending in 3) August 1
      Winter-term course (term ending in 4) August 1
    In determining whether the period of time elapsed is reasonable, all of the circumstances of the case shall be evaluated.
  4. Each Faculty shall have a Student Request Committee composed of:
    • no fewer than three faculty members appointed by the Faculty Council;
    • one representative appointed by the University Registrar;
    • one student appointed by the Faculty Council;
    • the Associate Dean (or delegate) who shall chair the Student Request Committee.
    The Independent Student Request Committee shall be composed of:
    • one representative appointed by each Faculty Council for a total of four representatives;
    • one student appointed by the Concordia Student Union;
    • one representative appointed by the University Registrar who shall chair the Independent Student Request Committee.
  5. A Student Request Committee may delegate the responsibility for handling certain kinds of requests to designated individuals other than the chair of the committee (e.g. academic advisors, faculty advisors, student affairs coordinators). Where a decision is made by a delegated individual, the student may appeal that decision to the Student Request Committee, as a whole, based on new evidence or other serious grounds, by sending an appeal request in writing, to the Chair of the Student Request Committee within ten (10) working days of receiving a decision made by a delegated individual. Such decisions must be clearly indicated as having been made by delegation.
  6. In all cases, the delegated individual and/or the Student Request Committee shall render a reasoned written decision, based on the complete and documented written request, within thirty (30) working days of receiving the request. Decisions of the Student Request Committee to grant a late DISC are final. In cases where the student has requested a full or partial refund of tuition and fees (late DNE, or late DISC with partial refund, respectively), and where the Student Request Committee supports the request, the SRC will forward its reasoned recommendation along with the complete dossier to the University Retroactive Withdrawal Committee, which will render the final decision.
    The University Retroactive Withdrawal Committee shall be chaired by the University Registrar and composed of:
    • one (1) representative appointed by each Faculty Council for a total of four (4) representatives (two-year term, renewable);
    • the Director of Health Services or delegate;
    • the manager of the Student Accounts Office or delegate;
    • one (1) student appointed by the Concordia Student Union.
  7. The University Retroactive Withdrawal Committee shall render a reasoned written decision, based on the complete and documented written request, within thirty (30) working days of receiving a recommendation from the Faculty Student Request or Independent Student Request Committee.
  8. The decisions of the University Retroactive Withdrawal Committee are final.

16.1.8     Graduation

Degree and certificate candidates who expect to complete requirements in a particular year must apply to the Office of the Registrar before July 15 for fall graduation and before January 15 for spring graduation. Students must complete the graduation application online by accessing the Concordia website: MyConcordia.ca > Student Information System > My Student Centre > Academics > Apply for Graduation. The graduation fee is payable whether or not a student attends convocation.


16.1.9     High Academic Achievement

A degree “With Distinction” will be awarded to students who obtain a final graduation grade point average (FGGPA: see §16.3.10 II.c) of at least 3.40 and below 4.00.
A degree “With Great Distinction” will be awarded to students who obtain a final graduation grade point average (FGGPA) of 4.00 or greater.


16.1.10     Student Record

The student record is a comprehensive report of a student’s academic history at the University. It is a complete academic record and includes all courses followed at Concordia. It is available to the student and to authorized University staff and faculty. Students may obtain a copy of their student record from the Birks Student Service Centre during normal operating hours or by written request. A processing fee must accompany the request. (See the Tuition and Fees website at concordia.ca/admissions/tuition-fees/how-
fees-are-billed/undergraduate/fees
for the current fee.) Students may also access their student record through MyConcordia.ca > My Student Centre > Other Academics (drop-down menu), at no charge.


16.1.11     Grading System

At the end of each course, the instructor will submit a letter grade for every student registered. Using the grade point equivalents listed below, grade point averages (GPA) are calculated for the evaluation of academic achievement, honours standing, prizes, and academic standing.

  Grade Grade Points  
       
  A+ } 4.30 }  
  A 4.00 Outstanding
  A- 3.70  
           
  B+ } 3.30 }  
  B 3.00 Very Good
  B- 2.70  
           
  C+ } 2.30 }  
  C 2.00 Satisfactory
  C- 1.70  
           
  D+ } 1.30 }  
  D 1.00 Marginal Pass
  D- 0.70  
           
  F, FNS 0   Poor — Failure
         
  R 0   Very Poor — Failure
         
Grade Not Reported (NR) 0    


Just passing courses required to fulfill curriculum requirements is not sufficient to qualify a student to graduate. There is also an academic performance requirement (grade point average) in most degree and certificate programs. See the pertinent section of each Faculty’s entry in the Calendar for complete details:

          Faculty of Arts and Science — Section 31
          John Molson School of Business — Section 61
          Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science — Section 71
          Faculty of Fine Arts — Section 81


16.1.12     Official Transcript of Credits

An official transcript of credits (hereafter “official transcript”) is a version of the student record intended for the use of external institutions, organizations, and employers. It is a complete academic record and includes all undergraduate and/or graduate courses followed at Concordia. It is accompanied by an explanation of its terminology and is sent directly to the addressee at the written request of the student, provided there is no outstanding balance owing to the University. An official transcript is printed on security paper, and is signed and sealed by the University Registrar.
Details on how to request an official transcript may be found at concordia.ca/students/records/transcripts/request-official-transcripts.


16.2     Curriculum Regulations

16.2.1     Modifications to Academic Programs and Regulations

With the exception of the following conditions, the curriculum requirements in effect at the time students are admitted or readmitted to a program (e.g. BA, BFA, Certificate in Business Studies) and/or concentration (e.g. major, specialization), are the requirements that apply to them until they complete their program.

  1. The University reserves the right to modify academic program requirements in the light of (a) changing trends in academic and professional fields, and (b) the availability of resources. In the exceptional event that a program is substantially altered by the University Senate, the University recognizes its responsibility to offer suitable transition arrangements for students. The new program requirements should become effective for all students no later than five years after the effective date of change for newly admitted students.
  2. When a program is discontinued, the University recognizes its responsibility to offer courses in the program while phasing it out according to a schedule appropriate to the needs of the affected students. Students will be informed of the schedule when the decision is made to phase the program out.
    When students in a discontinued program have not been registered for three years, it may not be possible to enable them to complete that program. They may, however, transfer into another program in the University for which they meet the admission requirements.
  3. Where students acquire credit towards a degree or certificate in a discontinuous manner and over a protracted time, the University reserves the right, at any time, to require them to take further credits or fulfill additional requirements to obtain that degree or certificate.
  4. Modifications to the academic regulations in §16.1 and 16.3 become effective for all students on a given date regardless of the student’s date of admission to a program, with the following exceptions:
                 16.1.9     High Academic Achievement
                 16.2.2     Residence Requirements
                 16.3.10  Academic Performance
    Modifications to these three regulations apply only to students admitted or readmitted to a program on or after the effective date of such modifications.
  5. In the event a student is readmitted after failing an academic year, the University reserves the right to require the student to take additional credits or to repeat certain courses. The student is also subject to changes in academic regulations or program requirements in effect at the time of the student’s readmission.
  6. Notwithstanding the above, all students in Engineering programs are required to meet the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) standards. Students are required to graduate having met the substantial equivalent of the curriculum in force in the winter term prior to degree conferral. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that their course selection meets the program requirements for their graduation. For further information, see §71.10.7.

16.2.2     Residence Requirements

Residence requirements define the number of credits that students working towards a Concordia University degree must take at the University itself.

  1. Of the total number of credits required for an undergraduate degree, students must take a minimum of 45 credits, normally the last 45, at Concordia University. The BEng, BA (Early Childhood and Elementary Education), BEd (Teaching English as a Second Language), BSc in Athletic Therapy, and BFA (Specialization in Art Education) require 60 credits, normally the last 60, at Concordia.
  2. At least 50 per cent of the credits for honours, specializations, majors, minors or other concentrations must be taken at Concordia. The BComm and BAdmin programs also require that at least 50 per cent of the core courses be taken at Concordia.
  3. Concordia University students who wish to include courses taken at another university within their residence requirements must obtain permission in advance from their Faculty Student Request Committee. Those wishing to engage in interuniversity exchanges in Quebec or student exchange programs must obtain authorization to cross-register from his or her academic advisor, the appropriate Associate Dean or delegate of the student’s Faculty, and the University Registrar. For participation in the Concordia Student Exchange Program, the student must comply with the specific Faculty requirements outlined at concordia.ca/students/exchanges/csep.
  4. Students who already have an undergraduate degree may undertake a second undergraduate degree, subject to the conditions below. Before registering, such students should consider whether their purpose might be better served by enrolling in a graduate degree, diploma, or certificate program. To obtain a second undergraduate degree, students must:
    1. Apply and register in a program with a higher concentration than a minor, and
    2. Complete at least two-thirds of the credits normally required for the second degree in courses other than those credited to the first degree — for example, a minimum of 60 credits must be completed when the normal requirement is 90 credits, and
    3. Complete at least 36 credits in the new field of concentration.
  5. An exception to 4b) above, is the BEd in TESL, for which students must complete at least half of the 120 credits required for the second degree in courses other than those credited to the first degree.
  6. Any student who is accepted at Concordia University after failing or compiling an unsatisfactory record at another university, will generally be required to complete at least 60 credits at Concordia.

16.2.3     Degree Regulations

The regulations relating to degree requirements are located in the Faculty sections:
          Faculty of Arts and Science — Section 31
          John Molson School of Business — Section 61
          Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science — Section 71
          Faculty of Fine Arts — Section 81


16.2.4     Concentration Requirements

Every undergraduate program requires a cohesive sequence of courses. To graduate in a degree program, a student must have completed one of the following concentrations: honours, specialization, major. In the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science, concentrations are referred to as programs. Most of these programs have options, where students take a number of related courses in a chosen area. Honours is a highly concentrated program with a required performance level; the specialization and the major require varying degrees of concentration, normally without a performance requirement. An honours, specialization, or major can be combined with a minor. In some circumstances, a double major is also possible.

1.       Honours Programs
The University offers programs leading to an honours degree in certain disciplines. The honours program consists of 60 or more credits in a discipline, with superior performance required to enter and remain in the program. In their first year, students may register in honours program courses, but their acceptance as honours students will depend on their performance. Students who do not meet requirements for honours standing may proceed in either a specialization or a major program.
There are minimum academic standards for honours programs. The honours student must:

  1. meet general degree requirements and the specific requirements for an honours program.
  2. maintain a grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 in all honours courses; the minimum acceptable grade in any honours course is “C.”
  3. have a minimum GPA of 2.70 for honours courses taken each year. For part-time students this is calculated in 18-credit blocks.
  4. have a GPA of no less than 2.00 in non-honours courses.

Honours students who do not meet these standards will be withdrawn from the honours program and will proceed in the major or specialization program. Reinstatement in the honours program is possible only with the permission of the Faculty Honours Committee.
The programs and particular Faculty regulations are listed in the Faculty sections under “Honours Programs.”


2.       Specialization Programs
A specialization is a sequence of courses totalling 60 or more credits. In a few cases it includes a performance requirement. In addition to courses in a particular discipline, the specialization may include courses in other closely related fields.


3.       Major Programs
A major is a sequence of courses totalling 36 or more credits, except in the John Molson School of Business where the major consists of at least 24 credits in a particular discipline in addition to the required 42-credit core. The major may include certain courses in other closely related fields.


4.       Minor Programs
A minor is a sequence of courses totalling 24 or more credits, except in the John Molson School of Business where the minor consists of at least 12 credits in the chosen discipline in addition to the required 42-credit core.


5.       Combined Programs
An honours, specialization, or major program may be combined with a minor program. In some circumstances, a major program may also be combined with another major program.


6.       Certificate Programs
An undergraduate certificate is a coherent program, usually of 30 credits, made up of regular undergraduate courses. Courses taken as part of a certificate program are normally applicable to the appropriate undergraduate degree. There is no guarantee that a certificate program can be completed in one academic year.


16.2.5     Writing Skills Requirement

Students admitted into the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science must meet a writing skills requirement. (See §71.20.7.)


16.2.6     Repetition of Courses

  1. A student may repeat a failed course only once. Nevertheless, a student who fails a required course twice may appeal to the appropriate Student Request Committee for permission to take the course a third time. If permission is not granted, the student may not be allowed to continue in the University towards that program and/or degree.
  2. A student who has received a passing grade for a course may repeat the course for personal reasons (e.g. to meet an external requirement) only once. A student may appeal to the appropriate Student Request Committee for permission to take the course a third time. The student record and official transcript will include all grades, but grades with the “REPT” notation will carry no credit value.
  3. A student who wants or needs to repeat a course that is prerequisite to other courses must do so before taking any following course in the sequence.
  4. The grade corresponding to the latest attempt of the course will be used for calculating the cumulative grade point average (CGPA: see §16.3.10 II.b) and the final graduation grade point average (FGGPA: see §16.3.10 II.c).
  5. In the case of courses taken more than once in the same assessment period, only the grade corresponding to the latest attempt of the course will be used in the calculation of the assessment grade point average (AGPA: see §16.3.10 II.a).
  6. A grade obtained as the result of a penalty for academic misconduct will remain in the calculation of the AGPA, the CGPA, and the FGGPA whether or not the course has been repeated.

16.3     EVALUATION, ADMINISTRATIVE NOTATIONS, EXAMINATIONS, AND
            PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS


16.3.1     Evaluation

A university degree or certificate attests that its holder has attained a measurable level of achievement as established by a recognized system of evaluation. Thus the performance of each student in each course must be evaluated by the instructor or instructors responsible for the course.
Final grades are determined by students’ performance on one or more of the following:

  1. assigned work, term papers, projects, etc.
  2. class participation which, in certain disciplines, may justify an attendance requirement
  3. progress tests
  4. laboratory tests and/or laboratory work
  5. mid-term and/or final examinations
  6. level of written expression.

The weight accorded to the various elements is at the discretion of the instructor or instructors responsible for the course.
At the beginning of a course the instructor will provide students with the evaluation scheme in writing. The scheme cannot be altered without appropriate notice.
Normally in the winter term and summer session, an instructor will submit final grades no later than seven calendar days after the scheduled final examination in a course or, where there is no final examination, seven calendar days after the last scheduled class in a course. All final grades for all courses are required to be submitted no later than seven calendar days after the University’s last scheduled final examination. In the case of grades for potential graduates, instructors are required to submit final grades no later than three calendar days after the scheduled final examination in a course or, where there is no final examination, three calendar days after the last scheduled class in a course. For the fall term, all final grades for all courses are required to be submitted three days after the commencement of the winter term. There may be additional delays before grades are posted as approvals of the grades and processing time are necessary. Students may obtain their grades through the Concordia website at myconcordia.ca.
Final grades and grade changes are official only when they have been approved by the appropriate Faculty Dean or delegate. The University reserves the right to make corrections at any time in case of error.


16.3.2     Language of Instruction and Examinations

While courses at Concordia University are normally taught in English, if students prefer, they may write assignments and examinations in either English or French. However, language and literature courses may require assignments and examinations to be written in the language being studied. Students who wish to write in French should ask at the beginning of a course whether their instructor can read French or whether someone else will evaluate their work. If the work must be read by another person, extra correction time may be required.


16.3.3     Failing Grades and Administrative Notations

Failing Grades “F,” “FNS,” “R,” and “NR” notations
 

  1. “F” indicates failure in a course in which a supplemental examination is available.
  2. “FNS” indicates failure in a course in which no supplemental examination is available.
  3. In a course graded “R,” a student is not permitted to write a supplemental examination, apply for a “MED” or “DEF” notation, or complete work late.
  4. “NR” stands for not reported and indicates that a student appears to have withdrawn from a course unofficially. It is assigned by the instructor when no material is available to evaluate and the instructor has been unable to submit a grade. “NR” carries a grade point value of zero and counts as a failure.
    In a course with an “NR,” a student is not permitted to apply for a “MED” or “DEF” notation, write deferred or supplemental examinations, or complete work late.

16.3.4     Administrative Notations “CODE,” “CUC,” “DEF,” “DISC,” “DNE,” “DNW,” “EREM,” “EX,” “EXTR,” “INC,” “INIT,” “LATE,” “MED,” “PEND,” “PEX,” “PTR,” “REPT,” “RPT,” “SRCR,” “SREP,” “SUPP,” “TRC,” “TREM,” “VALD,” “WRKT”

  1. “CODE” stands for Academic Code of Conduct Decision, and it is a repetition code that appears only on the student record. It indicates that the grade obtained as a result of a penalty for academic misconduct is included in the calculation of the GPAs whether or not the course has been repeated.
  2. “CUC” stands for Complementary University Credits and indicates credits earned as part of a Complementary University Credit certificate or individual study skills courses. These credits are not considered as program credits earned in any other degree or Faculty certificate program or Independent studies.
  3. “DEF” stands for Deferred and indicates that a student has been unable to write a final examination due to unforeseeable circumstances beyond the student’s control. A “DEF” notation carries no grade point value.
    For information on how to apply for “DEF” notations and the regulations that govern them, see §16.3.8 I.
  4. “DISC” stands for Discontinued and indicates that a student has properly withdrawn from a course after the end of the course-change period. The notation appears permanently on the student record and official transcript. It carries no grade point value and does not count in assessments of academic standing, but does count towards a student’s status (i.e. full- and part-time).
  5. “DNE” stands for Did Not Enter and is a temporary notation indicating that a student has officially withdrawn from a course by the deadline for withdrawal with tuition refund. The course and “DNE” notation are subsequently removed from the student record.
  6. “DNW” stands for Did Not Write and indicates that a student has not written the final examination for a course. The notation is used only in combination with a letter grade (such as “F/DNW,” “B/DNW”).
    A student in good standing may write a supplemental examination (if available) in a course with a “DNW” unless the grade is “R/DNW” or “FNS/DNW.”
    For information on how to apply for supplemental examinations and the regulations that govern them, see §16.3.8 III.
  7. “EREM” stands for Exemption Received Credit Removed and indicates that the credit earned for this course is not retained because it is a repetition of a course for which the student has already received exemption.
  8. “EX” stands for Exemption and indicates an exemption awarded for a course completed at another institution (no credit value).
  9. “EXTR” stands for Extra Credits and indicates that the grade is excluded from the GPA calculation but may be used in a future program.
  10. “INC” stands for Incomplete and indicates that a student has not completed required course work, such as a term paper, assignment, or laboratory and that the instructor has agreed to accept the work after the due date. The notation is used only in combination with a letter grade (such as “F/INC,” “C/INC”) and is assigned on the basis that the missing work is weighted as zero.
    When appropriate, “DNW” and “INC” can be used simultaneously (e.g. “F/INC/DNW”).
    For information on how to apply to complete courses with an “INC” notation, and the regulations that govern late completion, see §16.3.5.
  11. “INIT” stands for Initial Attempt and indicates the initial attempt of a course that was subsequently repeated.
  12. “LATE” stands for Late Completion Grade Obtained and indicates the final grade that replaces the grade attached to the initial enrolment. Only the final grade is included in the GPA. (Used from 1977-92.)
  13. “MED” stands for Medical and indicates that a student has been unable to write a final examination or complete other assignments due to a long-term medical situation. A “MED” notation carries no grade point value.
    For information on how to apply for “MED” notations and the regulations that govern them, see §16.3.8 II.
  14. “PEND” stands for Pending, is assigned by the University Registrar, and indicates that the grade is not available at this time.
  15. “PEX” stands for Potential Exemption and indicates a potential exemption for a course still in progress at another institution (no credit value).
  16. “PTR” stands for Potential Transfer Credits and indicates a potential transfer credit for a course still in progress at another institution.
  17. “REPT” stands for Repeat and indicates that the credit earned for this course is not retained because it is a repetition of a course or of similar course material for which the credit has already been earned.
  18. “RPT” stands for Report and indicates report work completed by a student in a co-operative education program. These credits are not considered as program credits earned.
  19. “SRCR” stands for Special Course Permission and indicates that special permission was given to take the same course more than twice where no credits were earned in previous attempts.
  20. “SREP” stands for Special Course Repetition and indicates that special permission was given to take the same course more than twice where credits are earned at the initial or second attempt.
  21. “SUPP” stands for Supplemental and indicates that supplemental examination credits and grade obtained are retained and included in the cumulative GPA and assessment GPA.
  22. “TREM” stands for Transfer Credit Received, Credits Removed and indicates that the credit earned for this course is not retained because it is a repetition of a course for which transfer credit has already been awarded.
  23. “TRC” stands for Transfer Credits and indicates transfer credit awarded for a course completed at another institution.
  24. “VALD” stands for Valid and identifies a new course with the same course name and number as other courses previously enrolled in. It is not considered as a repetition.
  25. “WRKT” stands for Work Term and indicates work completed by a student during a co-operative education work term. These credits are not considered as program credits earned.

16.3.5     Late Completion of Courses with “INC” Notations
               — Procedures and Regulations

  1. The deadlines for completion of course assignments are given to students on the first day of class. The “INC” notation is assigned when an instructor has agreed that a student may complete work after the deadline.
  2. A student with an “R” grade or “NR” notation in a course may not apply for late completion in that course.
  3. Students must apply for late completion of a course. Applications for Late Completion are available at the Birks Student Service Centre. For each course a processing fee applies.
    (See the Tuition and Fees website at concordia.ca/admissions/tuition-fees/how-fees-are-billed/undergraduate/fees for the current fee.) Completed applications must be returned to the Birks Student Service Centre by:
    February 1:  Fall-term courses
    May 15:  Winter-term and fall/winter courses
    September 1:  Summer-session courses
  4. The completed work must be submitted by:
    February 15:  Fall-term courses
    May 30:  Winter-term and fall/winter courses
    September 15:  Summer-session courses
  5. It is the responsibility of the instructor to submit a final grade within five days of these dates.

16.3.6     In Progress “IP” Notations — Procedures and Regulations
               — Faculty of Arts and Science

  1. The IP notation is assigned when an instructor has agreed that the work of a student in a course may be submitted past the time for reporting grades. At the undergraduate level the IP notation is applicable only to the completion of an honours thesis, internship or fieldwork outside of the University, or directed study or research. Students should refer to §31.003.3 for a list of applicable courses within the Faculty of Arts and Science. In all cases, the assignment of this notation is due to third party involvement in course work, where it is beyond the control of the instructor and/or the student for the student to complete the work within the required deadline.
  2. The completed work must be submitted by:
    April 1:  Fall-term courses
    August 1:  Winter-term and fall/winter courses
    December 1:  Summer-session courses
  3. It is the responsibility of the instructor to submit a final grade within 10 days of these dates.
  4. If the completed work is not submitted by the stated deadline, the IP notation will be changed to a letter grade.

16.3.7     Examinations

Students must present identification in order to write any examination. Acceptable identification is: Concordia student ID card or Medicare card or driver’s licence that bears the photo and signature of the student. Unless expressly permitted by the instructor, the possession of electronic communication devices is prohibited during examinations.

I.      Final Examinations

  1. Academic Calendar §11 lists the official examination periods.
  2. Examination schedules are posted in the Mezzanine of the Hall Building and in the second floor of the John Molson School of Business (SGW Campus) and CC 214 (LOY Campus); on kiosks throughout the campuses; or through the Concordia website at myconcordia.ca.
  3. Because special arrangements cannot be made in the event of personal time conflicts (including personal travel plans), students should not make commitments for the examination periods until after the final schedule is posted. Nonetheless, in certain documented circumstances, a student who will not be in the Montreal area during the official final examination period can request to write his/her examination at another university or college.
    A student who needs to write at an external institution must submit a “Request to Write a Concordia University Exam at an External Institution” available from the Birks Student Service Centre. The completed request should be submitted to the Birks Student Service Centre within the following deadlines:
    November 15:  for December final examination period
    April 1:  for April-May final examination period
    June 1:  for June final examination period
    August 1:  for August final and replacement/supplemental examination period
    The request must be accompanied by a per-course processing fee. (See the Tuition and Fees website at concordia.ca/admissions/tuition-fees/how-fees-are-billed/undergraduate/fees for the current fee.)
    Among the factors considered in the review of the request is the suitability of the testing location, testing conditions, and time constraints. The institution chosen must be an accredited university or college and the proctor/invigilator must be an employee of that institution and must agree to administer the exam(s) at the exact same date and time as scheduled at Concordia University and time differences must be taken into account.
    The student is responsible for any fees that may be charged by the external institution.
  4. An examination “conflict” is defined as two examinations scheduled at the exact same day and time or three examinations scheduled in consecutive time blocks (9:00-12:00, 14:00-17:00, 19:00-22:00; 14:00-17:00, 19:00-22:00, 9:00-12:00; 19:00-22:00, 9:00-12:00, 14:00-17:00). Two examinations in one day or three examinations in 24 hours are not considered a “conflict.”
     When a “conflict” exists, students are informed on the My Student Centre (View My Exam Schedule page) and are provided with a deadline by which they must advise how they intend to resolve the “conflict.” If a course has an “alternate” examination, there will be an “Alternate Available” date(s) displayed. Please be aware that the “Alternate Available” date(s) shown is intended for students who have a “conflict” in their examination schedule. Students who do not have an examination “conflict,” as defined above, are obliged to write their examination on the date that is indicated in the “Exam Date” column.
    Students who cannot write an examination due to work commitments or religious observations may also request permission to write an “alternate” by reporting their conflict and providing the appropriate documentation in support of their request. Further information is available by contacting the Registration and Examinations Office. Also see §16.3.7 III.3.
  5. No student will be admitted to the exam room if his/her name does not appear on the roster of students assigned to write in that room.
  6. No candidate will be permitted to enter an examination room after the first third of the examination has elapsed, or to leave before the first third of the examination has elapsed:
    3 hour examination:      no entry after first 60 minutes has elapsed;
                                         no exit before first 60 minutes has elapsed
    2.5 hour examination:   no entry after first 50 minutes has elapsed;
                                         no exit before first 50 minutes has elapsed
    2 hour examination:      no entry after first 40 minutes has elapsed;
                                         no exit before first 40 minutes has elapsed
    1.5 hour examination:   no entry after first 30 minutes has elapsed;
                                         no exit before first 30 minutes has elapsed
    1 hour examination:      no entry after first 20 minutes has elapsed;
                                         no exit before first 20 minutes has elapsed
  7. Students will be assigned to a specific desk/seat location.
  8. Student ID cards will be collected at the time of “signing-in” and will be returned when “signing-out.”
  9. Students may not leave the exam room during the last 15 minutes.
  10. If during the course of an examination a student becomes ill, the student should report at once to the invigilator, hand in the unfinished paper and request that the examination be cancelled. Before leaving the University, the student must also visit the Temporary Examinations Office location in order that a report of the situation may be filed. If physical and/or emotional ill-health is the cause, the student must then report at once to a physician/counsellor so that subsequent application for a deferred examination is supported by medical documentation.
  11. If a student completes an examination, even though he/she is ill or faced with other personal problems or situations, the subsequent grade obtained in the course must stand. Petitions on the grounds of illness will not be considered.
  12. In the fall and winter terms, no tests or examinations are permitted in the final week of classes. Any exceptions must be approved in advance by the appropriate Faculty Council.


II.    Deferred, Replacement and Supplemental Examinations – Regulations

 
The University Examinations Committee is comprised of one faculty member from each Faculty, a student representative, the Director of Health Services or delegate, and a representative from the Office of the Registrar.
 
1.     Deferred Examinations

  1. A student who did not write a final examination and has been granted a “DEF” notation is permitted to write a deferred examination.
  2. A deferred examination counts for the same weight in the course evaluation scheme and covers the same course material as the original examination.
  3. When a student receiving the privilege of writing a deferred examination does not write the examination during the specified period, the privilege will be withdrawn and a final grade in the course will be recorded by the Office of the Registrar according to the grade achieved by the student before the “DEF” notation was granted.
  4. An examination cannot normally be deferred a second time. A student who is prevented from writing the deferred exam due to extraordinary circumstances may apply to the University Examinations Committee for a retroactive “DISC” in the course. The Committee’s decisions are final.
  5. When a deferred examination has been written and evaluated, the grade is added to the student’s marks for other course work. The resulting final grade will replace the “DEF” notation on the student record and official transcript.
  6. A student who fails a course after writing a deferred examination may have one opportunity to write a supplemental examination during the next scheduled supplemental examination period provided the original grade was not “FNS” and all other criteria for writing a supplemental have been met (see §16.3.8 III).
  7. A student cannot write a deferred examination in a course with a grade of “R” or “NR.”

2.     Replacement Examinations

  1. A student who did not write a final examination and has been granted a “MED” notation is permitted to write a replacement examination.
  2. A replacement examination counts for the same weight in the course evaluation scheme and covers the same course material as the original examination.
  3. When a student does not write a replacement examination, no further examination, replacement or supplemental, will be scheduled. However, students who were prevented from writing the replacement examination due to extraordinary circumstances will be able to apply to the University Examinations Committee. If the Committee approves such a request, the student will be granted a retroactive “DISC.” The Committee’s decisions are final.
  4. When a replacement examination is not written, the “MED” notation (e.g. “MED/DNW”) will appear permanently on the student record and official transcript.
  5. When a replacement examination has been written and evaluated, the grade is added to the student’s marks for other course work. The resulting final grade will replace the “MED” notation on the student record and official transcript.
  6. A student who fails a course after writing a replacement examination, may have one opportunity to write a supplemental examination during the next scheduled supplemental examination period provided the original grade was not “FNS” and all other criteria for writing a supplemental have been met (see §16.3.8 III).
  7. A student cannot write a replacement examination in a course with a grade of “R” or “NR.”

3.     Supplemental Examinations

  1. A student who applies for and satisfies all the requirements is permitted to write a supplemental examination.
  2. Whether or not a supplemental examination is written, the original grade for the course (“F,”“F/DNW”) will remain permanently on the student record and official transcript.
  3. The grades from both attempts (first attempt and the supplemental examination) are included in calculating grade point averages and assessments of academic standing.
  4. A student who fails a supplemental examination is given a grade of “R.” A student who does not write a supplemental examination is not assigned a second failing grade for the course.
  5. When a student does not write a supplemental examination, no further examination, replacement or supplemental, will be scheduled. However, students who were prevented from writing the supplemental examination because of extraordinary circumstances will be able to apply to the University Examinations Committee.
  6. The University Examinations Committee is comprised of one faculty member from each Faculty, a student representative, and a representative from the Office of the Registrar. The Committee is chaired by the Associate Registrar. The Committee’s decisions are final.
  7. John Molson School of Business and the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science: There are no supplemental examinations available for courses offered in these Faculties, other than for COMP 201 and COMP 218.


III.      Deferred, Replacement, Supplemental, and Alternate Examination Periods

Deferred, replacement, supplemental, and alternate examinations are written at various times throughout the year.

1.     Deferred/Replacement Examinations

  1. John Molson School of Business and Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science: Deferred examinations for courses offered in these Faculties are written the next time the course is offered. For potential graduates in Engineering and Computer Science, if there is no examination scheduled for the course in question in the term before graduation, a deferred examination would be made available during the final examination period of that term.
  2. Faculties of Arts and Science, and Fine Arts: Deferred examinations for courses in these Faculties are written during the next regular examination period provided the course is given in the next term and that a final examination is scheduled.
    If the course is not offered or there is no examination scheduled for the course in question in the subsequent examination cycle, the deferred examination would be scheduled during the next replacement examination period (February [mid-term break], August, October).

2.     Supplemental Examinations

  1. John Molson School of Business and Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science: There are no supplemental examinations available for courses offered in these Faculties, other than for COMP 201 and COMP 218.
  2. Faculties of Arts and Science, and Fine Arts: Supplemental examinations for fall/winter courses (terms ending in 2, 3, or 4) are normally written in late August. For summer-session courses (session ending in 1) supplemental examinations are usually written in October. Graduating students may write supplemental examinations in February for fall courses (term ending in 2) only.

3.     Alternate Examinations

  1. When an academic department requests that students from all sections of a particular course be examined at the same date and time, this is known as a “common” exam.
  2. Because the scheduling of these “common” exams may conflict with the scheduling of other exams, an “alternate” exam can be made available. This “alternate” exam is a second exam covering the same material and is usually scheduled for the first Sunday immediately following the regular exam date.
  3. Courses with only one section will rarely have an “alternate” available to resolve conflicts.

4.     In certain documented circumstances, a student who will not be in the Montreal area during the deferred, replacement, supplemental, or alternate examination period can request to write his/her examination at another university or college. For information on writing examinations at an external institution, see §16.3.7 I.


16.3.8     Deferred “DEF,” Medical “MED” Notations and
                  Supplemental Examinations — Procedures and Regulations


I.      Deferred “DEF” Notations

  1. A student who has missed a final examination due to unforeseeable circumstances beyond his or her control can apply to have his or her original grade replaced by a temporary “DEF” notation. The original grade assigned must include a “DNW” notation.
    Note: Unforeseeable and/or extraordinary circumstances may include, but are not limited to, a serious illness or severe injury; a recent death in one’s immediate family; unexpectedly assuming responsibility of an immediate family member due to serious illness; severe emotional stress; fire. Personal travel is not an acceptable reason to be granted a “DEF” notation. In the case of work commitments or religious observations, see §16.3.7 I.4.
  2. A “DEF” notation cannot be assigned in a course with an “R” or “NR” notation.
  3. Application forms for “DEF” notations are available from the Birks Student Service Centre. A completed application must be submitted to the Birks Student Service Centre, not to the instructor, department, or Faculty, by January 15 for fall courses (term ending in 2), May 15 for fall/winter courses (terms ending in 3 and 4) or August 31 for summer courses (session ending in 1). The application must be accompanied by a Concordia medical certificate or, if the reasons are not medical, by other appropriate documents indicating that the student was unable to write an examination on the day or days in question. If the required documentation is not available before the application deadline, the student should submit the request form and provide the supporting material as soon as possible.
    Please note that in the case of absence due to short-term medical situations, the student must visit his or her medical practitioner on or before the date of the missed exam. Additionally, by submitting the Concordia medical certificate, the student authorizes the University to verify its legitimacy. Tampering, altering, or modifying the Concordia medical certificate in any way could lead to charges under the Code of Rights and Responsibilities and/or the Academic Code of Conduct.
  4. The application for a “DEF” notation must be accompanied by a per-course processing fee. (See the Tuition and Fees website at concordia.ca/admissions/tuition-fees/how-fees-are-billed/undergraduate/fees for the current fee.)
  5. The Registration and Examinations Office is entitled to ask the student to provide additional information.
  6. When the Registration and Examinations Office approves the awarding of the “DEF” notation, it will temporarily replace the student’s original grade for the course or courses concerned. The student is then entitled to write a deferred examination. For information about deferred examinations, see §16.3.7 II.
  7. When the deferred examination has been completed and evaluated, a new grade will replace the “DEF” notation.
  8. When a student receiving the privilege of writing a deferred examination does not write the examination during the specified period, the privilege will be withdrawn and a final grade in the course will be recorded by the Office of the Registrar according to the grade achieved by the student before the “DEF” notation was granted.
  9. Requests for deferred examinations can be made in a maximum of three (3) exam sessions during a student’s undergraduate or Independent studies at Concordia. Requests that exceed this number will be submitted to the University Examinations Committee for consideration. Refer to numbers 3, 4, and 5 of this section for information on the application process and deadlines.


II.    Medical “MED” Notations

  1. A student who has missed a final examination and/or been unable to complete course assignments due to a long-term medical situation can apply to have his or her original grade replaced by a “MED” notation. The original grade must include the “DNW” notation for a missed final examination; “INC” for course assignments not completed; “DNW/INC” when both elements are missing.
  2. A “MED” notation cannot be assigned in a course with an “R” grade or “NR” notation.
  3. Application forms for “MED” notations are available from the Birks Student Service Centre. A completed application should be submitted to the Birks Student Service Centre, not to the instructor, department, or Faculty, by January 15 for fall courses (term ending in 2), May 15 for fall/winter and winter courses (terms ending in 3 and 4), or August 31 for summer courses (session ending in 1). The application should be accompanied by a medical certificate on a physician’s original letterhead indicating that a long-term medical situation prohibited the student from being able to complete the final examination on the day or days in question. If the required documentation is not available before the application deadline, the student should submit the request form and provide the supporting material as soon as possible.
  4. The application for a “MED” notation must be accompanied by a per-course processing fee. (See the Tuition and Fees website at concordia.ca/admissions/tuition-fees/how-fees-are-billed/undergraduate/fees for the current fee.)
  5. The Registration and Examinations Office is entitled to ask the student to provide additional medical information.
  6. When the Registration and Examinations Office approves the acceptance of a medical certificate, the notation “MED” will replace the student’s original grade for the course or courses concerned. For information about “MED” replacement examinations, see §16.3.7 II.
  7. When the replacement examination or missing work has been completed and evaluated, a new grade will replace the “MED” notation. If the student does not write a replacement examination or complete the missing work, the “MED” notation will appear permanently on his or her student record and official transcript (e.g. “MED/DNW” or “MED/INC”). “MED” notations carry no grade point value. Courses with “MED” notations are not included in assessments of academic standing.
  8. The University reserves the right to refer a student to a physician appointed by the University for a recommendation when the student repeatedly submits medical certificates.


III.   Supplemental Examinations — Regulations

  1. Each Faculty determines the courses it offers where a supplemental examination is available.
  2. A student must be in acceptable standing in order to write a supplemental examination.
  3. A student is permitted to write only one supplemental examination for a course, whether or not the course is being repeated.
  4. A student who has received a passing grade for a course may not write a supplemental examination for that course.
  5. A student who has received an “NR” or “R” grade may not write a supplemental examination for that course.
  6. Applications to write supplemental examinations are available from the Birks Student Service Centre. A completed application should be submitted to the Birks Student Service Centre, not to the instructor, department, or Faculty, by June 15 for fall/winter courses (terms ending in 2, 3 and 4), September 16 for summer courses (session ending in 1) or February 1 for graduating students (fall-term courses [term ending in 2] only).
  7. The application for a supplemental examination must be accompanied by a per-course processing fee. (See the Tuition and Fees website at concordia.ca/admissions/tuition-fees/how-fees-are-billed/undergraduate/fees for the current fee.) The supplemental fee is refundable only if the student is denied permission to write the supplemental.

16.3.9  Academic Re-evaluation

I.      General

  1. Concordia University affirms the right of students to request the re-evaluation of course work, which includes tests, examinations, essays and other work that has contributed to the grading of a course. It is assumed that initiating a formal re-evaluation (“a re-evaluation request”) is a last recourse, taken when prior and sincere attempts to resolve problems and disagreements informally and directly have failed.
  2. Students have the right to see their course work. Students are responsible for the preservation of any material, in its entire and original form, which has been returned to them. A re-evaluation request may be refused if this material is not available.
  3. Instructors are responsible for the preservation of course work that has not been returned to students as follows: until December 31 of the next calendar year for fall-term courses; until April 30 of the next calendar year for fall/winter and winter-term courses; and until August 31 of the next calendar year for summer-session courses.
  4. In cases where grades are received for activities other than written or artistic course work, such as class participation, oral presentations, oral examinations and performance, no re-evaluation is normally possible. However, every attempt shall be made by the instructor concerned and the Chair of the Department to address the concerns raised by the student.
  5. The grounds for a re-evaluation request are restricted to claims that
    1. a miscalculation of the grade occurred; or
    2. the evaluation of the work was demonstrably unfair.
  6. A grade may be maintained, raised or lowered as a result of a re-evaluation request.


II.     Procedure

  1. Students who are dissatisfied with the grade received on one or more pieces of course work shall first attempt to meet with the instructor and explain their position. If the student remains dissatisfied or is unable to meet with the instructor, he or she may, upon receiving the final grade for the course, make a re-evaluation request.
  2. A re-evaluation request shall be made on an “Academic Re-evaluation Request” form available at the Birks Student Service Centre. The student shall specify the reasons for seeking the re-evaluation and shall indicate what informal attempts towards re-evaluation have been made. A processing fee must accompany the request. (See the Tuition and Fees website at concordia.ca/admissions/tuition-fees/how-fees-are-billed/undergraduate/fees for the current fee.)
  3. A re-evaluation request with respect to a fall-term course must be made no later than the following February 1; with respect to a fall/winter or winter-term course, no later than the following June 15 and with respect to a summer-session course, no later than the following October 1. These deadlines may be extended by the University Registrar in particular cases if the student can provide evidence that he or she was unable to have acted within the deadlines.
  4. The University Registrar shall forward the re-evaluation request to the Chair of the appropriate Department.
  5. The Chair shall decide whether the re-evaluation request conforms to the criteria outlined in articles 4 and 5 above within ten (10) days of receiving the re-evaluation request.
  6. If the Chair decides that the re-evaluation request does not conform to the criteria outlined in articles 4 and 5 above, he or she shall communicate this decision with reasons, in writing, to the student with a copy to the University Registrar. Should the student disagree with this decision, he or she has the right to appeal the Chair’s decision to Re-evaluation Appeals Panel as set out in article 25 below.
  7. Requests for review or other considerations that do not conform with the grounds for a re-evaluation request may fall under the purview of the Chair, the Dean, the Student Request Committee or other mechanisms.
  8. If the Chair decides that the re-evaluation request conforms with the criteria outlined in articles 4 and 5 above, he or she shall appoint a re-evaluator whose name shall be communicated to the student and to the instructor concerned. Normally, the re-evaluator shall not be an instructor in whose course the student is registered at that time.
  9. Before the re-evaluation begins, the instructor shall provide the Chair with information regarding the nature and structure of the course as well as the evaluation criteria and methods used. The Chair shall communicate this information to the re-evaluator.
  10. The entire piece of work identified by the student shall be re-evaluated. The re-evaluator may request additional input from the student or the instructor.
  11. The re-evaluation shall normally be completed within thirty (30) days of the Chair’s decision that the re-evaluation shall proceed. If it becomes clear that the thirty (30) day delay cannot be met, the Chair shall immediately communicate this information to the student in order to determine whether any serious difficulties may arise from extending the delay.
    In the case where the thirty (30) day delay is extended, every effort shall be made to remedy any academic disadvantage that the student may experience as a consequence of the extension of the delay.
  12. Upon completion of the re-evaluation, the re-evaluator shall assign a grade to the work in question and shall forward the re-evaluated material to the Chair along with a reasoned report. The reasoned report shall make mention of the documentation and methodology used.
    The Chair shall communicate the re-evaluation decision, in writing, along with the reasoned report, to the student, the instructor and the University Registrar, as well as whether the final grade for the course will be modified as a result of the re-evaluation decision.
  13. In cases where there is a significant discrepancy between the original grade assigned and the grade assigned by the re-evaluator, the Chair may convene a meeting with the instructor and the re-evaluator in order to discuss the issue before communicating the decision to the parties concerned. If disagreement as to the discrepancy remains after the meeting, the re-evaluator’s grade shall stand.
  14. In cases where the re-evaluation decision reveals a generalized flaw in the original evaluation process, the Chair shall take appropriate steps to ensure that the grades of other students in the course are reviewed and modified if appropriate.
  15. A final grade that is modified as a result of the re-evaluation shall be entered onto the student record and official transcript. If no appeal is filed, the modified grade shall permanently replace the original grade on the student record and official transcript. If an appeal is filed, an interim notation to the effect that the grade is “under appeal” shall accompany the grade until the final disposition of the case.


III.    Appeals

  1. A permanent Secretary of the Re-evaluation Appeals Panel (RAP) (the Secretary) shall be appointed by the Secretary-General. The Secretary shall be responsible for the administrative functioning of the RAP and shall maintain the confidential files of the RAP.
  2. A RAP of three (3) members, as well as a non-voting Chair, shall be selected by the Secretary for a given appeal. The RAP shall be composed of two (2) faculty members drawn from the Faculty Tribunal Pool and one (1) student drawn from the Student Tribunal Pool as provided for under the Policy for the Establishment of Tribunal Hearing Pools. Every attempt will be made to select the student member from the student’s constituency (undergraduate or graduate status).
  3. A student or instructor may appeal a re-evaluation decision based on either substantive grounds or on the presence of serious and prejudicial procedural defects. In the case of an appeal from an instructor, “prejudicial” shall be limited to the effect that the alleged procedural defect has on other students in the course or on the academic standards of the University. The appeal must state in clear and precise terms the grounds on which the appeal is based. Such an appeal must be made, in writing, to the Secretary within fifteen (15) days after the date of transmission of the re-evaluation decision.
  4. A student may appeal a Chair’s decision that the re-evaluation request did not conform to the criteria outlined in articles 4 and 5 above. This appeal may be based on either substantive grounds or on the presence of serious and prejudicial procedural defects in the Chair’s consideration of the re-evaluation request. The appeal must state in clear and precise terms the grounds on which the appeal is based. Such an appeal must be made, in writing, to the Secretary within fifteen (15) days after the date of transmission of the Chair’s decision.
  5. Upon receipt of an appeal from a student, the Secretary shall send a copy to the University Registrar, the Chair, the instructor and the re-evaluator, if appropriate, soliciting their input within ten (10) days. Any input received within the ten (10) day period shall be forwarded to all parties, soliciting their comments on the input within a further ten (10) days. All input and comments received within the twenty (20) day period shall form part of the dossier submitted to the RAP.
    Upon receipt of an appeal from an instructor, the Secretary shall send a copy to the University Registrar, the Chair, the student and the re-evaluator, if appropriate, soliciting their input within ten (10) days. Any input received within the ten (10) day period shall be forwarded to all parties, soliciting their comments on the input within a further ten (10) days. All input and comments received within the twenty (20) day period shall form part of the dossier submitted to the RAP.
  6. The RAP shall render a decision, based on the written record only, normally within thirty (30) days of the filing of an appeal. The RAP shall meet at least once in person before rendering its reasoned decision.
  7. In the case of an appeal of a re-evaluation decision, should the RAP determine that serious and prejudicial procedural defects were present in the re-evaluation process or that there are substantive grounds necessitating a new re-evaluation, it shall instruct the Chair to arrange for a new re-evaluation.
  8. Should the RAP decide that an appeal be upheld in the case of an appeal of a Chair’s decision that the re-evaluation request did not conform to the criteria outlined in articles 4 and 5 above, it shall instruct the Dean to arrange for a re-evaluation independent of the relevant Chair.
  9. The RAP shall communicate its signed, dated and reasoned decision to the student, the instructor, the re-evaluator (if appropriate), the Chair and the University Registrar and shall include copies of all documentation considered.
  10. The decision of the RAP is final.


IV.   Miscellaneous Provisions

  1. The word “days” is defined as working days, which excludes weekends, holidays and other days during which the University has reduced operations.
    In the calculation of any delay set out in these procedures, the months of July and August shall not be taken into account. In the case of an appeal submitted to the RAP before July 1, the regular delays set out in these procedures shall apply.
  2. Any written notice addressed to a student pursuant to Section III – Appeals under these procedures shall be sent by courier to the last address provided by the student to the University and shall be deemed to be received one (1) day after delivery.
  3. If the course in question was taught by the Chair, the Dean shall assume all of the duties imposed on the Chair in these procedures. If the course in question does not form part of a department, the re-evaluation request shall be forwarded to the appropriate administrator responsible for the course.
  4. The overall responsibility for the implementation and recommended amendments to these procedures shall rest with the Provost and Vice-President, Academic Affairs.

16.3.10      Academic Performance

I.      Performance Regulations
Students are required to maintain an acceptable standard of scholarship. Each student’s academic standing is assessed at the end of every year on the basis of an assessment grade point average (AGPA) as defined below.
The specific regulations applicable to students registered in each Faculty can be found in the following sections of the Calendar:


Faculty/School

See Calendar
Section

System
Used

     
Faculty of Arts and Science 31.003.1 AGPA
John Molson School of Business 61.22.1 AGPA
Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science 71.10.3 AGPA
Faculty of Fine Arts 81.20.4 AGPA

These regulations may be modified in the case of students transferring either between Faculties or from another university.


II.     Weighted Grade Point Average

All grade point averages are weighted and are calculated independently from one another.
A weighted grade point average is calculated as follows:
First, for each course attempted, the number of credits for the course is multiplied by the grade points obtained for the course, as specified in §16.1.11. Then, the sum of the grade points for all courses is divided by the total credits attempted.

Weighted Grade Point Average

=

S (course credits X grade points)
S (credits attempted)

S = sum of

Example:

Course Grade
Achieved
Credit
Value
  Grade
Points*
Weighted
Grade Points
1   D   3.00 X 1.00 = 3.00
2   C+   3.00 X 2.30 = 6.90
3   B   2.00 X 3.00 = 6.00
4   A-   6.00 X 3.70 = 22.20
5   F   3.00 X 0.00 = 0.00

Total Credits Attempted  17.00

Total Weighted Grade Points   

38.10

Weighted Grade Point Average   = 38.10
17.00
= 2.24

* As detailed in §16.1.11

a)    Assessment Grade Point Average (AGPA)
An assessment grade point average (AGPA) for each student is calculated at the end of each academic year (including the summer session, fall and winter terms), provided that the student has attempted a minimum of 12 credits. If the student has attempted fewer than 12 credits, these credits will be included in the assessment for the following academic year.
When a student transfers from one degree or certificate to another degree or certificate, the AGPA is calculated only for courses recorded in the current degree or certificate. (This calculation normally excludes the grades for any transfer credits awarded.) Special regulations for graduating students may be specified in each Faculty’s regulations.
Grades for supplemental and replacement examinations and for late completion of courses with “INC” or “MED” notations are included in the assessment period in which they are recorded.
In the case of courses taken more than once in the same assessment period, only the grade corresponding to the latest attempt of the course will be used in the calculation of the AGPA.
In the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science, prerequisite courses required for admission to a program will not be counted unless they are specifically listed on the student’s acceptance letter.
A grade obtained as the result of a penalty for academic misconduct will remain in the calculation of the AGPA whether or not the course has been repeated.

b)    Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)
The cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is the running total of the GPA since a student was admitted to the most recent degree (or certificate) program. It includes the same courses as were included in the calculation of the AGPA, and the courses for which “transfer credit” with an accompanying grade has been awarded in the most recent degree or certificate. In the case of repeated courses, only the grade corresponding to the latest attempt of the course will be used in the calculation of the CGPA.
A grade obtained as the result of a penalty for academic misconduct will remain in the calculation of the CGPA whether or not the course has been repeated.
The CGPA is used as the basis to determine eligibility for high academic achievement (§16.1.9).

c)    Final Graduation Grade Point Average (FGGPA)
The final graduation grade point average (FGGPA) is a CGPA of all courses applicable to the degree program being completed. In the case of transfer students, all courses taken at Concordia and transferred with the corresponding grades into the program being completed will be included in calculating the FGGPA. This FGGPA is calculated and recorded on the student record and official transcript only when a student graduates.
In the case of repeated courses, only the grade corresponding to the latest attempt of the course will be used in the calculation of the FGGPA.
A grade obtained as the result of a penalty for academic misconduct will remain in the calculation of the FGGPA whether or not the course has been repeated.
The FGGPA is used as the basis to determine eligibility for high academic achievement (§16.1.9).

d)    Term Grade Point Average (TGPA)
The term grade point average (TGPA) is the grade point average of all courses taken during the term to which it refers and appears on the student record and official transcript. It is for reference only and is used primarily for advising. The TGPA is dynamic, meaning that grade changes and repeated courses will modify historical TGPAs. The TGPA is not used in the calculation of any other GPA.


III.    Qualifying Programs and Visiting Students

Students registered in Qualifying programs or as Visiting students are subject to the regulations of the Faculty in which they are registered.


IV.   Independent Students

  1. Independent students are subject to the same grade point average requirements as students registered in programs offered by the Faculty of Arts and Science. (See 31.003.1)
  2. Independent students who are classified as failed may not reregister without permission of the University Registrar.


V.    Regulations for Failed Students and Students in Conditional Standing

  1. Failed students or students in conditional standing are not eligible to write supplemental examinations.
  2. Undergraduate students who are classified as failed may not reregister as Independent students.


VI.     Recording of Failed and Conditional Standing

Assessment of academic standing is noted on the student record and official transcript.

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