Skip to main content
LATEST INFORMATION ABOUT COVID-19

READ MORE

Cinematic Arts MFA

Admission Requirements

A Bachelor of Fine Arts or a Bachelor of Arts with a concentration in film production, video, photography, animation, media arts, or equivalent, with a minimum B average (GPA 3.00) in their undergraduate degree. In all cases, the students’ undergraduate experience and proficiency must be relevant to the area of cinematic arts. Some applicants who have undergraduate degrees in other programs may also be considered. Qualified applicants lacking prerequisite courses may be required to take up to 12 undergraduate credits in addition to the regular graduate program.

Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements and exemptions.

Requirements for the Degree

  1. Credits. A fully qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits.

  2. Courses. Candidates for the degree are normally required to complete 12 credits in the following core studio courses FMPR 620, FMPR 621, FMPR 622, FMPR 623, and 3 credits of FMPR 625 Graduate Symposium; 6 credits of elective course credits, 3 of which must be selected from FMPR elective courses, and 3 of which must be taken outside the program, to be approved by the Graduate Program Director and with permission of the other area offering the course; 24 credits of FMPR 691 Research-Creation Thesis. The maximum value of supervised internship allowable in the program is 3 credits.

  3. Thesis. Candidates are required to take 24 credits of a Research-Creation Thesis prepared under the supervision of a full-time professor in Film Production or Film Animation. The thesis encompasses two synthesized components: a creative production component and a written component.

  4. Thesis Supervisor. In admitting students to the program, the MFA Graduate Program Director ensures that a potential supervisor exists within the faculty for the student’s research area. The onus is on the student, however, to secure a member of the faculty to supervise the thesis.
     

Academic Regulations

  1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a detailed review of the Academic Regulations.

  2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is three terms of full-time study.

  3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time Limit requirements.

  4. Graduation Requirement. Please refer to the GPA Graduation Requirement section of the Graduate Calendar for GPA requirements.
     

Courses

Each year the Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema offers all the required program courses and a small selection of elective courses.

FMPR 620 Film Production I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in the Cinematic Arts MFA.
This research-creation methods course develops theoretical frameworks within cross-disciplinary trajectories for contemporary cinematic practices. Students investigate the reciprocal affiliations between theory and creative process, and the cultural and discursive contexts in which various cinematic idioms reside. Practice-based methodologies reflect the objectives of the program. Through a combination of seminar discussions, studio experiments, screenings, readings, and individual writings, students situate their thesis research creation conceptually and reflect critically on their creative processes. Writing exercises provide the foundation of the research-creation thesis proposal.
Note: Students who have received credit for FMPR 610 may not take this course for credit.

FMPR 621 Film Production II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Enrolment in the Cinematic Arts MFA; or a basic understanding of cinematographic principles such as exposure theory, lighting and camera-to-screen processes and written permission of the Graduate Program Director.
Students address moving image aesthetics from a filmmaker-creator's perspective through individual or group exercises and in-depth formal analyses. Moving from concept to screening, topics explored may include the poetics of light, spatialization, script visualization, improvised imaging, experimental optical processes, and analogue praxis. The overall focus of this course is on the relationships between methods, materials, and the formal or stylistic strategies used across diverse cinematic practices.
Note:
Students who have received credit for FMPR 611 may not take this course for credit.

FMPR 622 Film Production III (3 credits)
Prerequisite
: Enrolment in the Cinematic Arts MFA; or a basic knowledge of sound recording and post-production processes and written permission from the Graduate Program Director.
This studio course addresses sound aesthetics and allows students to develop an individualized approach to the audiovisual relationship within cinematic contexts. Studio projects emphasize the composition of sound in combination with film production, animation, and other forms of moving-image media. Workshops in audio production complement screenings and readings. Topics may include auditory perception, sound for animation, documentary and fiction, music for screens, visual music, sound art, and sound re-recording.
Note:
Students who have received credit for FMPR 612 may not take this course for credit.

FMPR 623 Film Production IV (3 credits)
Prerequisite
: FMPR 620.
This studio course in methods and processes examines interdisciplinary and collaborative strategies of innovative cinematic processes in a diversity of genres. Through a combination of studio experiments, screenings and writings, the course engages topics such as division of labor and disciplinary specialization; poetics of space and temporality; cinematic technologies and exhibition modalities; creative producing strategies; and assessment of experimental processes and outcomes. The course culminates in a presentation of creative work and the thesis project proposal.
Note:
Students who have received credit for FMPR 613 may not take this course for credit.

FMPR 625 Graduate Symposium (3 credits)
Prerequisite
: FMPR 623.
Under the guidance of an instructor, the Graduate Symposium fosters a community of practice and research by exposing students to a diversity of materials, methods and processes, with the aim of expanding their understanding of disciplinary similarities and differences within the cinematic arts. Throughout this symposium series, in-progress thesis research presentations by students are enhanced with presentations by faculty and visiting cine-artists. In addition to oral presentations, students are required to submit a written research report for evaluation.
Note:
Students who have received credit for DISP 615 may not take this course for credit.

FMPR 630 Special Topics in Creative Nonfiction (3 credits)
This course examines approaches specific to contemporary nonfiction cinematic production. Through studio assignments, screenings and readings, the course integrates both theory and practice in idea development, production and post-production with a focus on aesthetics and ethics. Topics may include independent documentary approaches, direct cinema, essayistic forms, experimental practices, hybrid forms, interactive documentary, ethnographic research- creation, and expanded screen idioms.

FMPR 640 Special Topics in Fiction Practices (3 credits)
A graduate studio course in contemporary approaches to auteur-driven cinematic fiction directing. Through workshops, readings, screenings and studio experiments, topics explored may include writing as creative practice, dramatic screenwriting and script analysis, innovative development processes, previsualization, work with actors, experimental on-set methodologies, mise-en-scène and diverse directorial approaches to image/sound poetics.

FMPR 661 Professional Internship (3 credits)
Prerequisite
: 9 credits completed in the MFA in Cinematic Arts.
An internship proposal must be supported by a full-time faculty member and approved with written permission by the Graduate Program Director (GPD). Under the joint supervision of the faculty member and the film industry supervisor, the student is employed within by a professional organization or other research affiliate relevant to the field of cinematic arts. Upon completion of the 150-hour internship, students are required to submit a learning outcomes report to the industry supervisor for signature, prior to submitting the report to the faculty member for assessment.
Note 1:
Students who have received credit for INTP 661 may not take this course for credit.
Note 2:
Students may not take this course to satisfy the Film Production (FMPR) elective requirement. Students may only receive credit for this course in place of the out-of-program elective requirement with written permission from the GPD.

FMPR 671 Independent Study (3 credits)
Prerequisite:
9 credits completed in the MFA in Cinematic Arts. The independent study course offers students opportunities to research and write about particular topics in film production that are not covered in the courses offered. The independent study proposal must be supported by a full-time faculty member and approved with written permission by the Graduate Program Director.
Note 1:
Students who have received credit for INDS 671 may not take this course for credit.
Note 2:
Students may not take this course to satisfy the Film Production (FMPR) elective requirement. Students may only receive credit for this course in place of the out-of-program elective requirement with written permission from the GPD.

FMPR 691 Research-Creation Thesis (24 credits)
The thesis encompasses two synthesized components: a creative production component and a written component. The creative production constitutes an integral part of the research- creation and may be presented in a variety of cinematic idioms and platforms. Its length is dictated by considerations of genre and technique, and therefore varies accordingly. The written component should demonstrate knowledge of prevailing practices and precedents as they relate to the creative production; critically consider the processes employed; and exhibit a basic knowledge of the literature relevant to the creative production.
Note:
Students who have received credit for PROJ 691 and PROJ 692 may not register for the Research-Creation Thesis.

Back to top Back to top

© Concordia University