Concordia University

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Art History

Doctor of/Doctorate in Philosophy (Art History)

Admission Requirements. Those applying for either full-time or part-time admission must possess a Master of Arts degree or its equivalent in Art History. Applications must include a thesis research project accompanied by a letter of support from the proposed supervisor in the department. Prospective students should therefore contact individual professors, or the Graduate Program Director, to find the right supervisor for their doctoral research project.

Language Requirements. Since this is a bilingual program, applicants must demonstrate a level of competence that would allow them to read and to follow lectures and discussions in both English and French. The ability to speak and write with facility in both languages is not required; students may participate in discussion, and may write reports, examinations and theses in English or French, as they choose.

Admission Procedures. The interuniversity admissions committee reviews all applications.

Requirements for the Degree

  1. Credits. A fully qualified candidate entering the program with a Master’s/Magisteriate degree is required to complete 90 credits. These are apportioned as follows: courses and seminars, 12 credits; research tutorial, 6 credits; doctoral forum, 3 credits; comprehensive examinations, 9 credits; and thesis, 60 credits.

    Typical progress for a full-time student in the program would consist of:

    First Year: Block A seminar (6 credits), one seminar from Block B (3 credits), one elective seminar, approved by advisor (3 credits), research tutorial (6 credits).

    Second Year: Comprehensive examinations (before fifth semester) (9 credits), doctoral forum (3 credits).

    Third Year: Thesis (60 credits).

  2. Residency. The minimum required residency is three consecutive semesters.

  3. Courses. The courses offered through the inter-university program are open to all students, regardless of the university at which they are enrolled. All students must take the Block A seminar (Art History and its Methodologies), one Block B seminar selected from one of six thematic categories under the general heading Art History and its Object, and either another Block B seminar or a graduate seminar offered by one of the four universities and approved by the thesis supervisor.

  4. Comprehensive Examinations (ARTH 808). Before the fifth semester each full-time student must successfully complete one oral and two written examinations, which are evaluated by the three professors constituting the student’s thesis committee. These examinations are based on a pre-established list of readings focused on the theoretical and methodological issues which inform the student’s specific area of research. The exams are intended to verify whether the student is sufficiently prepared to undertake the writing of a thesis. Students who fail these examinations must take them a second time during the following semester. Those failing the second attempt will be withdrawn from the program.

  5. Research Tutorial (ARTH 820). This tutorial is directed by the thesis advisor and is oriented to the student’s thesis topic. Its objective is to allow the student to articulate a detailed research project, define its corpus, and develop its theoretical and methodological hypotheses with a view to obtaining the approval of the thesis committee. This project, including an activity calendar, must be submitted at the end of the student’s first year. Students should register once work is completed and a grade has been assigned.

  6. Doctoral Forum (ARTH 807). In the interests of promoting the development of an intellectual community within the program, a forum consisting of professors from the program and students engaged in their course work will be invited to present their ongoing research. The forum will be held once each semester during the academic year. Each student, at some point in his/her coursework, must give a paper based on his/her thesis research. This paper will be evaluated by a committee consisting of three professors and accorded a pass or fail grade.

  7. Thesis (ARTH 830). The doctoral candidate must submit a thesis which makes an important and original contribution to knowledge in Art History. The thesis is defended orally before a committee composed of five individuals: the thesis advisor, the two other members of the thesis committee, one examiner from a department or program within the university other than the candidate’s, and one external examiner from outside the four universities.

Academic Requirements

  1. C Rule. Students who receive more than one C grade during the course of their PhD studies will be required to withdraw from the program. Students may apply for re-admission. Students who receive another C after re-admission will be required to withdraw from the program and will not be considered for re-admission.

  2. F Rule. Students who receive a failing grade in the course of their PhD studies will be withdrawn from the program. Students may apply for re-admission. Students who receive another failing grade after re-admission will be required to withdraw from the program and will not be considered for re-admission.

  3. Time Limit. All work for a doctoral degree must be completed within 18 terms (6 years) of full-time study or 24 terms (8 years) of part-time study from the time of original registration in the program.

  4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.00.

Courses

Block A Seminars:

ARTH 809 Art History and Its Methodologies I (3 credits)
Students from across the interuniversity program explore the epistemological foundations of the discipline of art history in this required methodology seminar. The goal of this course is to investigate the tools and mechanisms that govern the practice of art and art history, placing them in their context of emergence and in relation to the students' own thesis projects. Methodological concerns are at the heart of this reflection on the state of the discipline.
Note: Students who have received credit fro ARTH 800 may not take this course for credit.

ARTH 810 Art History and Its Methodologies II (3 credis)
Prerequisite: ARTH 809.
Students from across the interuniversity program explore the epistemological foundations of the discipline of art history in this required methodology seminar. The goal of this course is to explore the tools and mechanisms that govern the practice of art and art history, placing them in their context of emergence and in relation to the students' own thesis projects. Methodological concerns are at the heart of this reflection on the state of the discipline.
Note: Students who have received credit for ARTH 800 may not take this course for credit.

Block B Seminars: Art History and Its Object

B1: ARTH 801 Periods and Territories (3 credits)
B2: ARTH 802 Classification - Genres, Artistic Disciplines (3 credits)
B3: ARTH 803 Thematic Questions (3 credits)
B4: ARTH 804 Writings on Art (3 credits)
B5: ARTH 805 Critical Examination of Artistic Context (3 credits)
B6: ARTH 806 Formal and Semantic Studies (3 credits)

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Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Art History)

Admission Requirements. A Bachelor of Fine Arts or a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Art History or approved equivalent with at least a B+ average in the major area is required. Applicants with deficiencies in their undergraduate preparation may be required to take a qualifying program prior to formal entry into the program. Qualified applicants lacking prerequisite courses may be required to take up to 12 undergraduate credits in addition to and as part of the regular graduate program.

Requirements for the Degree

  1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits.

  2. Residency. The minimum residency requirement is three terms of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study.

  3. Language Requirement. Reading knowledge of English and French is mandatory. Students are required to pass an examination in their second language, either French or English, prior to graduation.

  4. Courses. The program includes two required courses: ARTH 655 Thesis Seminar (3 credits, pass/fail) and ARTH 654 Annotated Review of Sources and Documents (3 credits). The remaining five seminars are to be chosen from the Department's yearly seminar offerings. Exceptionally, with the approval of the graduate program director, students can register for one seminar (3 credits) in another discipline or at another university. The graduate program director or the student’s supervisor will assist the student in choosing seminars. Course scheduling is undertaken with the needs of both part-time and full-time students in mind.

  5. Thesis. Each student must submit a thesis (10000 to 12000 words) prepared under the supervision of a full-time professor who will examine the thesis along with two other scholars.

Academic Regulations

  1. C Rule. Students who receive more than one C grade during the course of their MA studies will be withdrawn from the program. Students may apply for re-admission.

  2. F Rule. Students who receive a failing grade in the course of their studies will be withdrawn from the program. Students may apply for re-admission. Students who receive another failing grade after re-admission will be withdrawn from the program and will not be considered for re-admission.

  3. Time Limit. All work for a Master’s/Magisteriate degree for full-time students must be completed within 12 terms (4 years) from the time of initial registration in the program at Concordia University although students are encouraged to complete the degree within 6 terms (2 years); for part-time students the time limit is 15 terms (5 years).

  4. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00.

MA Courses

Each year the Department of Art History will offer a selection of courses from those listed below. A list of those courses, as well as information as to the specific content of seminar offerings, is available on the Department of Art History website

ARTH 610 Selected Issues in North American Art and Architectural History (3 credits)
An examination of selected issues in the production of or writing about the visual arts in North America.

ARTH 611 Industrialization and the Built Environment (3 credits)
An examination of selected aspects of the built environment when considered as more than a physical accumulation of structures.

ARTH 612 Contextualizing North American Sculpture: Topics in History, Theory and Practice (3 credits)
An examination of selected topics in the production of or writing about sculpture in North America.

ARTH 613 Special Topics in Amerindian and Inuit Art and Art History (3 credits)
Selected topics pertaining to the evolving arts practices of indigenous North American, considering such themes as collection and exhibition, commodity, continuity, and power relationships.

ARTH 614 Examining the Craft and Artisan Traditions in North America (3 credits)
Selected topics pertaining to the theory and practice of the so-called “craft” and “decorative” arts within a North American context.

ARTH 615 Issues in Postcolonial Theory in Art and Art History (3 credits)
Selected aspects of post-colonial and diasporic theory as they relate to North American art and art history.

ARTH 621 Collecting and Patronage in Canada (3 credits)
Investigations related to how and for whom Canadian art has been commissioned and collected.

ARTH 626 Nationhood and Identity in Canadian Art (3 credits)

ARTH 627 Feminism, Art, Art History (3 credits)
Aspects of feminism in relation to the production of art and writing about art in North America.

ARTH 633 Creative and Critical Literature in Art History (3 credits)
Aspects of the relationship between art and text, such as artists’ books, the impact of critical writing on art practice, etc.

ARTH 635 Topics in Canadian Painting (3 credits)
Selected topics pertaining to the practice of painting in Canada.

ARTH 636 Seminar in Canadian Architecture (3 credits)
Selected topics pertaining to the practice of architecture in Canada.

ARTH 638 Topics in Canadian Photography (3 credits)
Selected topics pertaining to the practice of photography in Canada.

ARTH 639 Issues in North American Architectural History (3 credits)
Selected issues pertaining to the production of or writing about architecture in North America.

ARTH 640 Issues in North American Photographic History (3 credits)
Selected issues pertaining to the production of or writing about photography in North America.

ARTH 641 Issues in Visual and Material Culture (3 credits)
Selected issues pertaining to the integration into art history of visual image/phenomena and material objects not traditionally considered to have fallen within definitions of the “fine arts”.

ARTH 642 Aspects of Media and New Media (3 credits)
Aspects of the historical development, thematic content and conceptual strategies of practices involving media and “new technologies.

ARTH 643 Topics in Art and Globalization (3 credits)
An examination of selected topics pertaining to the manner in which art has negotiated and continues to negotiate globalization.

ARTH 647 Independent Studies in North American Art History (3 credits)

ARTH 648 Aspects of Museum and Curatorial Studies: Theory (3 credits)
Aspects of the theoretical underpinnings of museum and curatorial practices.

ARTH 649 Aspects of Curatorial Practice (3 credits)
The development and application of curatorial knowledge, skills and practices as fostered through the organization of an exhibition and related events.

ARTH 654 Annotated Review of Sources and Documents (3 credits)
Students take this individualized study course with their supervisor, normally in the summer term following the first year of study. This course must be completed before students begin writing their thesis. Supervisor and students meet to determine the list of scholarly texts and/or archival materials to be addessed in order to strengthen the students' foundational knowledge of their designated research field and prepare them for writing the thesis.The students are responsible for a series of annotations, together with an essay that synthesizes the annotated material (total word count approximately 6000 words).

ARTH 655 Thesis Seminar (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ARTH 654.
This course is designed to introduce students to the intellectual and professional aspects of graduate school and academia, such as writing a thesis, conducting research, engaging with art historical theory and methodologies, giving a conference paper, applying for grants. Credit for this pass/fail seminar is accorded once the students have delivered their thesis presentation during the second year of the program.

ARTH 656 Thesis (24 credits)

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