Concordia University

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Religion

Doctor of/Doctorate in Philosophy (Religion)

This degree is offered conjointly with the Département des sciences religieuses of the Université du Québec à Montréal and the Faculté de théologie et de sciences religieuses of the Université Laval. There are five areas of concentration: theories of religion, history of religions, contemporary religious phenomena, Judaic studies, and comparative religion and ethics. A student chooses to register in one of the three universities on the basis of the match between faculty expertise and the student’s specialization, and is subject to that university’s regulations. Each student is graduated by the university of their registration. The joint degree provides a context for collaboration between the three departments, with some exchange of faculty for teaching and direction. There are two required doctoral seminars one of which is common to students at all three universities in alternate years.

The doctoral program in Religion at Concordia places strong emphasis on a comparative approach. The comparative study of religion incorporates a number of different but related inquiries, including: examination of the inter-relations between religious beliefs and practices; analysis of religions as social and cultural phenomena and of cultures and societies insofar as they have been influenced by religious traditions; study of inter-relations between religions and human values; investigation of religious ethics; as well as analysis of social issues from the perspective of religious values. These studies are comparative insofar as particular expressions of religions and ethics are viewed as unique but historically situated realities which often can best be understood by making formal or informal comparisons with other comparable realities.

Although the requirements are fundamentally the same in all three universities, the remainder of this section applies only to students registered at Concordia.

Admission Requirements. A Master of Arts in Religion, or equivalent, with high standing from a recognized university.

The Department will consider the application of students to the PhD program for entry without completion of the master’s degree if the following requirements are met:

  • the student has completed 18 credits of graduate level course work in Religion with high standing;
  • the student is recommended by full-time members of the faculty of the Department of Religion;
  • the student has acquired a breadth of knowledge in the study of Religion through course work or scholarly or professional experience;
  • the student has demonstrated her or his ability to do independent graduate-level research in religious studies, and has demonstrated the ability to produce an original analysis of her/his research (in the form of research papers, conference papers, or publications);
  • the student has a well-formed and focused research plan that will serve as a basis for her/his doctoral research.

Transfer Credits. See Transfer Credits in Graduate Admissions section.

Proficiency in English. Any student applying from outside Canada whose first language is not English must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by writing the Test of English as a Foreign Language administered by the Educational Testing Service. Information and applications to write the test may be obtained by writing to: Test of English as a Foreign Language, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, 08540, U.S.A.

Requirements for the Degree

  1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 90 credits.

  2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is two years (6 terms) of full-time graduate study beyond the master’s degree, or the equivalent in part time study, or three years (9 terms) of full-time graduate study beyond the bachelor’s degree.

  3. Doctoral Seminars. All candidates must register for RELI 890 (6 credits) in their first or second or equivalent year of study. This seminar will deal with general and methodological issues in the study of religion. It will be held in common with UQAM and Université Laval; discussion and readings will be both in English and in French. In the first or second or equivalent year of the program, the student will register as well for one of the following seminars according to their specialization: RELI 891, Comparative Religion and Ethics (6 credits), or RELI 892, Judaic Studies (6 credits).

  4. Courses. A student is required to register for a minimum of 18 credits of directed reading. These courses are offered according to the resources of the department and the needs of the students. They are grouped into RELI 800-818 (Topics in Judaic Studies) and RELI 820-839 (Topics in Comparative Religion and Ethics). Some of the courses at the Master of Arts level are open to PhD candidates, with the requirement of additional work and higher standards of performance.

  5. Comprehensive Examination. Graduate students in Religion at the doctoral level are expected to pursue a program of independent study and research in their chosen field. After course work is completed, all candidates must take RELI 860: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (15 credits). The comprehensive examination will consist of three written exams followed by an oral examination which reviews these exams. In most cases, two of these written exams focus on topics from two distinct religious traditions; the third written exam will be on a topic related to a student’s proposed thesis. One of the three exams should include a focus on theory and methodology. Credits are not distributed among these four examinations. For purposes of registration, this work will be designated as RELI 860 and is graded as pass/fail.

  6. Thesis. Each candidate will prepare a doctoral thesis which is to be an original contribution to scholarship. Although the topic should be provisionally chosen and serve as a coordinating factor throughout the student’s doctoral program, a written proposal must be formally submitted and approved by the Graduate Studies Committee after the successful completion of the comprehensive examination. For purposes of registration, the thesis will be designated as RELI 870: Doctoral Thesis (45 credits).

  7. Language Requirement. Students must achieve an acceptable command of the classical and/or modern languages appropriate to their area of specialization. Specific requirements in terms of numbers of years of study and examinations or other demonstrations of competence are established in consultation with the Graduate Program Director and the thesis supervisor. Students are also expected to be proficient in the language or languages of the primary sources relevant to their thesis research. All Canadian students are required to demonstrate a working knowledge of both English and French.

Academic Regulations

  1. GPA Requirement. The academic progress of students is monitored on a periodic basis. To be permitted to continue in the program, students must obtain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 based on a minimum of 12 credits. Students whose GPA falls below 3.00 are considered to be on academic probation during the following review period. Students whose GPA falls below 3.00 for two consecutive review periods are withdrawn from the program.

  2. C Rule. A graduate student who receives one grade of “C” will be evaluated by the Departmental Graduate Studies Committee with respect to that student’s continuance in the program. Two “C”s will result in automatic withdrawal from the program. See Academic Standing in Academic Regulations section.

  3. IP Rule. Students who accumulate more than one IP (In Progress) notation or one IP that has turned into an F shall not normally be permitted to register for courses until the outstanding work is completed.

  4. F Rule. Students who receive a failing grade in the course of their PhD studies will be withdrawn from the program. See Academic Standing in Academic Regulations section.

  5. Time Limit. The limit to complete the doctoral program is six years (18 terms) of full-time study or eight years (24 terms) of part-time study from the time of original registration in the program.

  6. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have satisfied all degree requirements and have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00.

Courses

Since the topics of elective courses are subject to modification according to student enrolment and demands, no course list is provided in this calendar.

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Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (History and Philosophy of Religion)

Admission Requirements. An undergraduate degree in religious studies or Judaic studies, or its equivalent. Qualified applicants requiring prerequisite courses may be required to take up to 12 undergraduate credits in addition to and as a part of the regular graduate program. Applicants with deficiencies in their undergraduate preparation may be required to take a qualifying program. Qualifying program students in the Department of Religion must complete their program with a minimum GPA of 3.50 with no courses graded lower than a “B” to be considered for admission to the graduate program. Qualifying students must reapply to the MA program on completion of their qualifying program.

Transfer Credits. See Transfer Credits in Graduate Admissions section.

Proficiency in English. Any student applying from outside Canada whose first language is not English must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by writing the Test of English as a Foreign Language administered by the Educational Testing Service. Information and applications to write the test may be obtained by writing to: Test of English as a Foreign Language, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, 08540, U.S.A.

Requirements for the Degree

  1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits.

  2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is one year (3 terms) of full-time graduate study, or the equivalent in part-time study.

  3. Program Options. All students enter in option B (course-intensive, without thesis) and later have the opportunity to apply for option A (with thesis).

Academic Regulations

  1. GPA Requirement. The academic progress of students is monitored on a periodic basis. To be permitted to continue in the program, students must obtain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 based on a minimum of 12 credits. Students whose GPA falls below 3.00 are considered to be on academic probation during the following review period. Students whose GPA falls below 3.00 for two consecutive review periods are withdrawn from the program.

  2. C Rule. A graduate student who receives one grade of “C” will be evaluated by the Departmental Graduate Studies Committee with respect to that student’s continuance in the program. Two “C”s will result in automatic withdrawal from the program. See Academic Standing in Academic Regulations section.

  3. IP Rule. Students who accumulate more than one IP (In Progress) notation or one IP that has turned into an F shall not normally be permitted to register for courses until outstanding work is completed.

  4. F Rule. Students who receive a failing grade in the course of their studies will be withdrawn from the program. See Academic Standing in Academic Regulations section.

  5. Time Limits. The time limit to complete the MA in History and Philosophy of Religion for full-time students is 4 years (12 terms) from the time of initial registration in the program or 5 years (15 terms) for part-time students.

  6. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have satisfied all degree requirements and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00.

Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (History and Philosophy of Religion) with Thesis (Option A)

Candidates are required to take the following:

  1. Core Courses. RELI 609: Theories of Religion (3 credits); and RELI 610: Methodological Problems in the Study of Religion (3 credits).

  2. Elective Courses. Five other 3-credit courses (15 credits), normally including three courses in another religious tradition.

  3. Thesis Proposal. RELI 655: (3 credits). Students must submit a thesis proposal on a topic chosen in consultation with the thesis supervisor and the proposal must be approved by the Department’s Graduate Studies Committee.

  4. Thesis. RELI 600: (21 credits). Students who wish to transfer to the thesis option should have a 3.50 GPA or higher. Once the Thesis Proposal (RELI 655) is approved the student will be transferred from option B - without thesis to option A - with thesis. Each thesis shall be read and evaluated by the student’s thesis supervisor and by two other scholars, one of whom may be an outside examiner.

  5. Language Requirement. Students are expected to acquire knowledge of the classical and/or modern languages appropriate to their area of specialization. Specific requirements will be established in consultation with the Graduate Program Director. Students who intend to pursue graduate studies at the PhD level are also encouraged to gain proficiency in the language or languages of the primary sources relevant to their proposed research.

Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (History and Philosophy of Religion) without Thesis (Option B)

Candidates are required to take the following:

  1. Core Courses. RELI 609: Theories of Religion (3 credits); and RELI 610: Methodological Problems in the Study of Religion (3 credits).

  2. Elective Courses. Ten other 3-credit courses (30 credits), normally including four courses in another religious tradition.

  3. Guided Research Paper. RELI 603 (9 credits) involves the preparation of a substantial research paper.

  4. Language Requirement. Students are expected to acquire knowledge of the classical and/or modern languages appropriate to their area of specialization. Specific requirements will be established in consultation with the Graduate Program Director. Students who intend to pursue graduate studies at the PhD level are also encouraged to gain proficiency in the language or languages of the primary sources relevant to their proposed research.

Courses for the Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (History and Philosophy of Religion)

Candidates for the Master of Arts in the History and Philosophy of Religion may select courses from the course category listings below, as well as those offered by the Master of Arts program in Judaic Studies, which are listed in the next section. Courses are selected in consultation with the Graduate Program Director.

No graduate student may take more than two 3-credit courses or one 6-credit course outside the Department. Permission to substitute outside courses must be granted before taking the course by both the Graduate Program Director in the History and Philosophy of Religion program and by the other Department involved.

All of the general course categories listed below are for one-term, 3-credit courses unless otherwise indicated. A list designating which specific courses are to be offered in any given year, with description of content is available from the Graduate Program Assistant, and on the Department website

Note: For those courses where the subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year, students may register for these courses, provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the course subtitle.

Topics in World Religions

Courses offered in recent years include: Islam in North America; Survey of Islamic literature; The Systems of Yoga; Advaita Philosophy of Sankara; Social History of Indian Religions; Women and Buddhism; Hindu Myth and Myth Theory; Buddhist Cosmologies; Power and the Body in Hindu and Buddhist Tantra; Tibetan Religions; and Religions of Iran.

RELI 608 Studies in the History of Religions
This course takes a historical approach and can deal with one or more religious traditions such as Manichaeism. 

RELI 611 Concepts in the Historical Study of Judaism
Serving as an introduction to the study of Judaism as well as the field of Judaic Studies, this course investigates the ways in which Jews have conceived of themselves in relation to history and the historical process.

RELI 612 History of Islamic Thought and Institutions
This course focuses on the areas of Islamic thought and institutions principally in the classical period. Examples of topics offered in the past are Islamic mysticismsurvey of Islamic religious literature, and medieval Islamic iconography.

RELI 613 Modern Islamic Thought and Institutions
This course treats areas of Islamic thought and institutions principally in the modern period.  Examples of topics offered in the past are Islamic lawIslam and the other, andIslam in North America.

RELI 614 History of Hindu Thought and Institutions
This course treats areas of Hindu thought and institutions principally in the classical and medieval periods.  Examples of topics offered in the past are Advaita Vedanta,Tantra in South Asia, and devotional traditions of Medieval India.

RELI 615 Modern Hindu Thought and Institutions
This course treats areas of Hindu thought and institutions in the modern period.  Examples of topics offered in the past are religious movements in modern India and a comparative perspective on Dharma.

RELI 616 History of Buddhist Thought and Institutions
This course treats areas of Buddhist thought and institutions, often in tandem with other religions with which Buddhism has coexisted.  Examples of topics offered in the past are Buddhist cosmologies, social history of Indian religions, and religions of Tibet.

RELI 617 Modern Buddhist Thought and Institutions
This course treats areas of Buddhist thought and institutions principally in the modern period such as Tibetan religions: texts and traditions, engaged Buddhism, contemporary women and Buddhism and esoteric Buddhism in China and Tibet. The content of this course may vary from year to year.

RELI 618 Studies in World Religions and Problems in Modernization in the Middle East and Asia
This course focuses on the modern and contemporary periods and may deal with one or more religious traditions such as Islam in modern South Asia and colonialism in India.

RELI 619 Reading Course in World Religions
The content of this course may vary according to the interests of students.  Examples of topics offered in the past are popular Hinduism, Chinese history and religion, and pre-Islamic Iranian religions.

RELI 620 Studies in Iranian Religions
This course may treat a range of religious traditions, including Zoroastrianism, Manichaeism, and the Baha'i Faith, as well as other religions such as Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam in their Iranian context.

Topics in Religious and Philosophical Thought

Courses offered in recent years include: Religious Wars, Violence, and Sacrifice; Religion and Postmodernism; Jewish and Christian Responses to the Holocaust; Faith and Reason in Medieval Judaism, Islam, and Christianity; Abrahamic Faiths; and Theories of Sacrifice.

RELI 621 Selected Readings in Modern Religious Thought
This course considers various areas and issues of modern religious thought. Examples of topics offered in the past are women's religious lives and Schleiermacher, Comte and J.S. Mill.

RELI 623 Selected Readings in Contemporary Religious Thought
The content of this course varies from year to year. This course treats various areas and issues of contemporary religious thought. Examples of topics offered in the past are Jewish and Christian responses to the Holocaust and the psychology of religion.

RELI 626 Religious Language
This course provides students with opportunities to explore in-depth issues of religious language, scripture and texts. Examples of topics covered in the past are readings in New Testament Greek and readings in Christian Latin.

RELI 627 Mysticism
This course focuses on specific topics with respect to the phenomenon of mysticism.

RELI 628 Faith and Reason in Religion
This course treats various perspectives on the relationship between faith and reason in religion. Examples of topics offered in the past are faith and reason in Medieval Judaism, Islam, and Christianity, and the problem of the 'Thou' in Kierkegaard and Buber.

RELI 629 Reading Course in Religious and Philosophical Thought
The content of this course may vary from year to year.  Examples of topics offered in the past are religion and postmodernism and Buddhist ethics.

Topics in Religion and Society

Courses offered in recent years include: Love, Sex and Marriage in Judaism; Daoism and Chinese Popular Religion; Heresy and the Formation of Christian Tradition and Justice; Ethics and Religion in a Secular Culture; Gnosticism; and Christian Reformation.

RELI 630 Theoretical Problems in Religion and Culture
This course is concerned with the intersection between religion and culture. Examples of topics offered in the past are anthropology of religion, masculinities and religion, the Abrahamic traditions, and science fiction, fantasy and the religious imagination.

RELI 632 Comparative Ethics
This course focuses on the various areas and issues in comparative ethics. Examples of topics offered in the past are justice and Jewish marriage and divorce.
Note: Students who have received credit for a topic under RELI 633 may not take the same topic under RELI 632 for credit.

RELI 636 Religion and the Arts in Contemporary Cultures
This course treats the intersections of religion and the arts. Examples of topics offered in the past are religion and literature, religion and art in India, and 19th-century North American art.

RELI 637 Christianity and Society: Ancient and Medieval Periods
This course looks at the intersections of Christianity, culture and society in the ancient and medieval periods. Examples of topics covered in the past are asceticism, gnosticism, and iconography.

RELI 638 Christianity and Society: Reformation and Modern Periods
This course looks at modern reform movements within Christianity.  Examples of topics offered in the past are the Christian reformations and mystics, heretics and reformers.

RELI 639 Reading Course in Religion and Society
This course treats religions in interaction with particular historical or contemporary communities and social issues.  Examples of topics offered in the past are medieval Jewish communities, millennial thinking, and religion and politics in Iran.

Topics in Christian Studies

Courses offered in recent years include: History of Popular and Official Christianity; Body and Soul - Questions of Dualism; Diversity in Early Christianity; History of Women and Christianity; and From Toleration to Political and Social Activism.

RELI 640 Biblical Studies
This course looks at issues and questions emerging from the Hebrew and Christian scriptures. Examples of topics covered in the past are ancient apocalypticism andChristian origins.

RELI 641 History of Christian Thought
This course looks at ideas, movements and personages within the broad history of Christian thought. Examples of topics covered in the past are history of Church and family; diversity in early Christianity, 400-1700; the reluctant Goddess: Mary and Christian traditions; and Christian Saints.

RELI 643 Contemporary Catholic Thought
The content of this course may vary from year to year within the context of the social teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

RELI 644 Protestantism
While the content of this course varies from year to year, it examines ideas, movements and personages within the broad history of Protestant or Reform Christianity.

RELI 646 Christian Ethics
Topics covered in this course provide an examination of issues, questions and debates within central ethical issues.

RELI 647 Orthodox Christianity
While the content of this course varies from year to year, it considers ideas, movements and personages within the broad history of the Orthodox Christian traditions.

RELI 649 Reading Course in Christianity
The content of this course varies according to the interests of students. Examples of topics offered in the past include same-sex relations, mysticism, asceticism, and saints.

Topics in Judaic Studies

See listings for Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Judaic Studies) below.

Thesis, Research Paper, Thesis Proposal, Methodology

RELI 600 Master’s Thesis in History and Philosophy of Religion (21 credits)
RELI 603 Research Paper (9 credits)

RELI 609 Theories of Religion (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to introduce, examine critically, and compare a selection of contemporary theories of religion including the phenomenological, the theological, the historical, the anthropological, the cognitive, the critical, and the social scientific.

RELI 610 Methodological Problems in the Study of Religion (3 credits)
This required course examines some of the methodological issues and challenges in the social scientific and comparative study of religion. It looks at both the classical and contemporary perspective.

RELI 655 Master’s Thesis Proposal (3 credits)

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Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Judaic Studies)

Admission Requirements. An undergraduate degree in Judaic Studies or its equivalent, including courses corresponding to RELI 301 (The Hebrew Bible), RELI 326 (Ancient Judaism), RELI 327 (Medieval Jewish Thought and Institutions), RELI 328 (Modern Jewish Thought and Institutions). Qualified applicants requiring prerequisite courses may be required to take up to 12 undergraduate credits in addition to and as a part of the regular graduate program. Applicants with deficiencies in their undergraduate preparation may be required to take a qualifying program. Qualifying program students in the Department of Religion must complete their program with a minimum GPA of 3.50 with no courses graded lower than a “B” to be considered for admission to the graduate program.
Candidates must demonstrate proficiency in the reading of Hebrew by taking an examination.

Transfer Credits. See Transfer Credits in Graduate Admissions section.

Proficiency in English. Any student applying from outside Canada whose first language is not English must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by writing the Test of English as a Foreign Language administered by the Educational Testing Service. Information and applications to write the test may be obtained by writing to: Test of English as a Foreign Language, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, 08540, U.S.A.

Requirements for the Degree

  1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits.

  2. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is 3 terms of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study.

  3. Program Options. All students enter in course option B (course intensive, without thesis), and later have the opportunity to apply for option A (with thesis).

Academic Regulations

  1. GPA Requirement. The academic progress of students is monitored on a periodic basis. To be permitted to continue in the program, students must obtain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 based on a minimum of 12 credits. Students whose GPA falls below 3.00 are considered to be on academic probation during the following review period. Students whose GPA falls below 3.00 for two consecutive review periods are withdrawn from the program.

  2. C Rule. A graduate student who receives one grade of “C” will be evaluated by the Departmental Graduate Studies Committee with respect to that student’s continuance in the program. Two “C”s will result in automatic withdrawal from the program. See Academic Standing in Academic Regulations section.

  3. IP Rule. Students who accumulate more than one IP (In Progress) notation or one IP that has turned into an F shall not normally be permitted to register for courses until outstanding work is completed.

  4. F Rule. Students who receive a failing grade in the course of their studies will be withdrawn from the program. See Academic Standing in Academic Regulations section.

  5. Time Limits. The time limit to complete the MA in Judaic Studies for full-time students is 4 years (12 terms) from the time of initial registration in the program or 5 years (15 terms) for part-time students.

  6. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have satisfied all degree requirements and have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00.

Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Judaic Studies) with Thesis (Option A)

  1. Core Courses. RELI 610 (3 credits), and RELI 609 (3 credits) or RELI 611 (3 credits).

  2. Elective Courses. Five other 3-credit courses, which may include one course in another religious tradition (15 credits).

  3. Thesis Proposal. RELI 655 (3 credits). Students must submit a thesis proposal on a topic chosen in consultation with the thesis supervisor and the proposal must be approved by the Department’s Graduate Studies Committee.

  4. Thesis. RELI 602 (21 credits). Students who wish to transfer to the thesis option should have a 3.50 GPA or higher. Once the Thesis Proposal is approved the student will be transferred from option B without thesis to option A with thesis. Each thesis shall be read and evaluated by the student’s thesis supervisor and by two other scholars, one of whom may be an outside examiner.

  5. Language Requirement. Students are expected to acquire knowledge of Hebrew as a condition for admission to the program. In addition, if the candidates’ research necessitates knowledge of another classical or modern language, the Graduate Studies Committee may require proficiency in that language. Specific requirements will be established in consultation with the Graduate Program Director. Students who intend to pursue graduate studies at the PhD level are especially encouraged to gain proficiency in the language or languages of the primary sources relevant to their proposed research.

Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Judaic Studies) without Thesis (Option B)

  1. Core Courses: RELI 610 (3 credits), and RELI 609 (3 credits) or RELI 611 (3 credits).

  2. Elective Courses. Ten other 3-credit courses, including at least one course in another religious tradition (30 credits).

  3. Guided Research Paper: RELI 603 (9 credits) involves the preparation of a substantial research paper.

  4. Language Requirement. Students are expected to acquire knowledge of Hebrew as a condition for admission to the program. In addition, if the candidates’ research necessitates knowledge of another classical or modern language, the Graduate Studies Committee may require proficiency in that language. Specific requirements will be established in consultation with the Graduate Program Director. Students who intend to pursue graduate studies at the PhD level are especially encouraged to gain proficiency in the language or languages of the primary sources relevant to their proposed research.

Courses for the Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Judaic Studies)

Candidates for the Master of Arts in Judaic Studies may select courses from the general course categories listed below, as well as those offered by the Master of Arts program in History and Philosophy of Religion, which are listed in the previous section. Courses are selected in consultation with the Graduate Program Director.

No graduate student may take more than two 3-credit courses or one 6-credit course from those offered outside the Department. Permission to substitute outside courses must be granted by both the Graduate Program Director in the Judaic Studies program and by the other Department involved.

All of the general course categories listed below are for one-term, 3-credit courses unless otherwise indicated. A list designating which specific courses are to be offered in any given year, with description of content is available from the Graduate Program Assistant, and on the Department website

Note: For those courses where the subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year, students may reregister for these courses, providing that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the course subtitle.

RELI 611 Concepts in the Historical Study of Judaism

Other graduate courses offered by the Judaic Studies program fall into the following categories:

RELI 650-659 Topics in Hebrew Bible and Ancient Near Eastern Studies
RELI 660-669 Topics in Rabbinic Judaism
RELI 670-679 Judaism in Late Antiquity
RELI 680-689 Topics in Medieval Judaism
RELI 690-699 Topics in Modern Judaism

Topics in Hebrew Bible and Ancient Near Eastern Studies

Courses offered in recent years include: Women in the Hebrew Bible and The Book of Judges.

RELI 650 Hebrew Bible
The content of this course may vary from year to year within the context of specific issues with respect to the Hebrew Bible. Examples of topics treated in the past are women and the Hebrew Bible, and development of the text and ancient translations of the Hebrew Bible.
Note: Students who have received credit for a topic covered under RELI 651 may not take the same topic under RELI 650 for credit.

RELI 656 Ancient Near Eastern Studies
While the content of this course varies from year to year, it treats specific issues with respect to ancient Near Eastern studies. Examples of topics in this area are Mesopotamian Mythologies and The Epic of Gilgamesh.

RELI 659 Reading Course in Ancient Near Eastern Studies
The content of this course may vary from year to year. This course treats specific issues with respect to ancient Near Eastern studies. Examples of possible topics are women in the Bible; religions of the ancient Mediterranean; and death and dying in the ancient Mediterranean world.

Topics in Rabbinic Judaism

Courses offered in recent years include: Judaic Law-Gender Issues and Early Rabbinic Texts.

RELI 664 Tannaitic Literature
This course treats specific issues with respect to ancient Rabbinic literature. Examples of topics in this area include Mishna and Tosefta and early Rabbinic texts.

RELI 665 Midrash
This course treats specific issues with respect to ancient Rabbinic Midrash. Examples of topics in this area are Halakhic Midrashim and in Midrash Rabba.

RELI 666 Talmud
This course treats specific issues with respect to the Talmud such as Judaic law and gender issues.

RELI 669 Reading Course in Rabbinic Judaism
This course treats specific issues with respect to Rabbinic Judaism. Examples of topics in this area are studies in Jewish law and Jewish liturgy.

Topics in Judaism in Late Antiquity

Courses offered in recent years include: Midrash and Talmudic Mysticism.

RELI 670 Judaism in Late Antiquity
This course treats specific issues with respect to the Talmud. Examples of topics in this area are the Dead Sea Scrolls; Talmudic mysticism and Merkava literature; andApochrypha and Judaism in late antiquity.

RELI 677 Hellenistic Literature
This course treats specific issues with respect to ancient Jewish Hellenistic writings. Examples of topics in this area are the books of Maccabees and studies in Josephus.

Topics in Medieval Judaism

Courses offered in recent years include: Jewish Law and Ethics and Jews and Christians in the Middle Ages.

RELI 680 Medieval Jewish History
Topics under this number treat specific issues with respect to medieval Judaism.  Examples of topics in this area are Jews and Christians in the Middle Ages andmedieval Jewish law and ethics.
Note: Students who have received credit for a topic under RELI 685 may not take the same topic under RELI 680 for credit.

RELI 686 Medieval Jewish Thought
This course treats specific issues with respect to Medieval Jewish Thought. Examples of topics in this area are studies in Saadiah Gaon and studies in Maimonides.
Note: Students who have received credit for a topic under RELI 687 may not take the same topic under RELI 686 for credit.

RELI 688 Jewish Mysticism
This course deals with the historical development of mysticism in Judaism from its ancient beginnings to contemporary times, including especially the Judaic intellectual movement known as Kabbala. Examples of topics in this area are Zohar, Safedian Kabbala, and Medieval Ashkenazic Hasidism.

RELI 689 Reading Course in Medieval Judaism
This course examines topics in the history of Judaism in the medieval period. Subjects include topics in the social, religious, and intellectual history of medieval Jews. Examples of such topics include Medieval Judaic and Christian Apocalypticism, Medieval Jewish Rationalistic Philosophy, and Liturgical Poetry in Medieval Ashkenaz.

Topics in Modern Judaism

Courses offered in recent years include: Judaism and Pluralism; Religion and State in Israel; Impact of the Holocaust on Religious Thought; and Gender Issues in Modern Jewish History.

RELI 694 Modern Jewish Thought
This course explores areas in the intellectual history of Modern Judaism. Topics offered include the notion of the other in Judaism and Religious Pluralism in Modern Jewish Thought.
Note: Students who have received credit for a topic under RELI 695 or RELI 696 may not take the same topic under RELI 694 for credit.

RELI 697 Modern Jewish History
This course covers topics in the history of Jews and Judaism in the modern period. Examples of topics in this area are women in Modern Jewish history, history of Zionism in North America, Hasidism at its 1815 Turning Point, and Canadian Jewish Studies.
Note: Students who have received credit for a topic under RELI 698 may not take the same topic under RELI 697 for credit.

RELI 699 Reading Course in Modern Judaism
The content of this course may vary from year to year focusing on specific issues with respect to modern Judaism. Examples of topics in this area are Sephardic responses to modernity, Hasidism, and Canadian Jewish ritual art.

Topics in the History and Philosophy of Religion (Especially relevant to the program in Judaic Studies)

RELI 628 Faith and Reason in Religion
RELI 641 History of Christian Thought

Thesis, Research Paper, Thesis Proposal, Methodology

RELI 602 Master’s Thesis (Judaic Studies) (21 credits)
RELI 603 Research Paper (9 credits)
RELI 609 Theories of Religion (3 credits)
RELI 610 Methodological Problems in the Study of Religion (3 credits)
RELI 655 Master’s Thesis Proposal (3 credits)

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