Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/academics/graduate/calendar/current/fasc/psyc.html

Psychology

Specific Information about all Programs

Admission Requirements. Admission to the PhD degree requires a master’s degree in psychology from a recognized university. Admission to the MA degree requires an honours degree in psychology or its equivalent. Enrolment in these programs is limited in part by the availability of research supervisors and, for the Research and Clinical Training Option, by space in that option.

Applicants are selected on the basis of past academic record, letters of recommendation, the results of the Graduate Record Examination (optional, but highly recommended), and the relevance of their proposed research to the research expertise of the faculty. Students successfully completing their master’s program in psychology at Concordia University need submit only an application form and letters of recommendation when applying for the doctoral degree. Psychology graduate courses are not open to graduate-level independent students, except in specific circumstances as defined by the department.

Upon recommendation of their thesis supervisor, students enrolled in the Master of Arts (Psychology) program at Concordia University who have completed a minimum of 12 credits of graduate level course work and who have shown high academic performance and potential through performance in research may apply for accelerated admission to doctoral studies without submitting a master’s thesis. Approval for accelerated admission must be obtained from the student’s thesis committee and the graduate admissions subcommittee by August 15 to allow entry into the PhD program in the Fall term. Students in the Research and Clinical Training option may not obtain accelerated admission to the PhD program from MA Year I, but may apply for accelerated admission, upon recommendation of their thesis supervisor, from MA Year II.

Undergraduate Teaching. Students are encouraged to take opportunities to assist in undergraduate teaching. The department treats such teaching as part of the student’s learning experience. Discussion of aims and techniques as well as advice and criticism will be involved as part of the training that students obtain as teaching assistants.

Colloquia. All students are expected to attend departmental colloquia.

Language Requirements. Although no formal language courses or examinations are required, students intending to work in Quebec are strongly encouraged to develop a working knowledge of French. Students who plan to seek admission to the Order of Quebec Psychologists (OPQ) are advised that Article 46 of the professional code of the Province of Quebec states that a working knowledge of French is required for professional certification.

Academic Regulations

  1. GPA Requirement. The academic progress of students is monitored on a periodic basis. To be permitted to continue in the program, students must obtain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 based on a minimum of 12 credits. Students whose GPA falls below 3.00 are considered to be on academic probation during the following review period. Students whose GPA falls below 3.00 for two consecutive review periods are withdrawn from the program.

  2. C Rule. Students receiving a grade of C in two courses will have their status within the program reviewed by the Graduate Committee. Normally a C in two courses is grounds for withdrawal. In cases of extenuating circumstances probationary continuation in the program will be considered.

  3. F Rule. Students receiving a failing grade in the course of their studies will have their status within the program reviewed by the Graduate Committee. Normally a failing grade is grounds for withdrawal. In the case of withdrawal, students may apply for re-admission.

  4. Time Limits. All work for the PhD degree must be completed within 18 terms (6 years) of full-time study or 24 terms (8 years) of part-time study.
    All work for the MA degree for full-time students must be completed within 12 terms (4 years) from the time of initial registration in the program at Concordia University; for part-time students the time limit is 15 terms (5 years).
    All work for the Diploma in Clinical Psychology must be completed within 12 terms (4 years) from the time of initial registration in the program at Concordia University.

  5. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00.

Doctor of/Doctorate in Philosophy (Psychology)

Requirements for the Degree

  1. Residence. The minimum residence requirement is two years (6 terms) of full-time study beyond the MA degree, or the equivalent in part-time study.

  2. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 90 credits, including Core courses and elective Options.

  1. Core Courses:

    1. Students are required to complete 72 credits of core courses as follows: PSYC 801, 802 (6 credits); PSYC 880 (0 credit); PSYC 890 (60 credits); PSYC 721, 724, 725, 726 or 727 (6 credits).

    2. Comprehensive Examination. Students are required to write a comprehensive examination (PSYC 880) within 12 months of being admitted for the degree. The examination will be in two parts, one dealing with general issues and the other with the candidate’s area of specialization.

    3. Thesis. The research will be undertaken within one or more of the areas of research specialization of the department (Behavioural Neuroscience, Clinical and Health Research, Human Development and Developmental Processes, and Cognitive Science) under the supervision of a faculty member. The thesis is expected to make a significant contribution to the advancement of knowledge. The content and form of the thesis must be approved by a departmental committee prior to submission to the School of Graduate Studies. For purposes of registration, this work will be designated as PSYC 890: Research and Thesis (60 credits).
       

    Research Option (18 credits):

    In addition to the core courses, students select from the following sets of courses for a maximum of 18 credits:

    1. PSYC 844, 845, 846 or 847 (3 to12 credits). Each 3-credit seminar may be taken up to 4 times as an elective option provided the topic differs.

    2. PSYC 700, 701, 714, 716, 721, 724, 725, 726,727, 734, 850, or 851 (6-15 credits). Special Topics seminars PSYC 721, 724, 725, 726, and 727 may be taken up to 5 times as an elective option provided the topic differs.

    Research and Clinical Training Option (18 credits):

    In addition to the core courses, students select from the following sets of courses for a maximum of 18 credits:

    1. PSYC 823, 824, or 825 (3 credits); PSYC 834 (3 credits); PSYC 835, 836, or 837 (3 credits); PSYC 841, 842, or 843 (3 credits); PSYC 838, 839, or 840 (3 credits); and PSYC 885 (3 credits).

    2. At least one adult and one child client must be seen in the required practicum courses ((APC Practicum II or III, Extramural Practicum I). All students following the Research and Clinical Training Option are expected to attend case conferences at the Applied Psychology Centre training clinic.

Top

Master of/Magisteriate in Arts (Psychology)

Requirements for the Degree (Research Option)

  1. Residence. The minimum period of residence is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study.

  2. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits consisting of course work and thesis as follows: PSYC 601 (3 credits); PSYC 644, 645, 646, or 647 (3 credits); PSYC 714 (6 credits); 3 credits selected in consultation with the thesis supervisor from among PSYC 700, 716, 721, 724, 725, 726, 727 or 734; and PSYC 690 (30 credits).

  3. Thesis. The student must submit a thesis on a topic relating to one or more of the areas of research specialization of the department (Behavioural Neuroscience, Clinical and Health Research, Human Development and Developmental Processes, and Cognitive Science) chosen in consultation with his or her thesis supervisor. Topics must be approved by a committee of the department. The thesis shall be read and graded by the student’s thesis director and by at least two other scholars, one of whom may be an outside examiner. For purposes of registration, this work will be designated as PSYC 690: Research and Thesis (30 credits).

  4. Thesis Examination. The student must defend the thesis and demonstrate knowledge of the field in which the thesis falls in an oral examination before a committee of the department.

Requirements for the Degree (Research and Clinical Training Option)

  1. Residence. The minimum period of residence is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study.

  2. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits consisting of course work and thesis as follows: PSYC 601 (3 credits); PSYC 644, 645, 646, or 647 (0 credits); PSYC 700 (3 credits); PSYC 714 (6 credits; PSYC 734 (3 credits); and PSYC 690 (30 credits).Students in this option will concurrently complete the courses indicated under Diploma in Clinical Psychology.

  3. Thesis. The student must submit a thesis on a topic relating to one or more of the areas of research specialization of the department (Behavioural Neuroscience, Clinical and Health Research, Human Development and Developmental Processes, and Cognitive Science) chosen in consultation with his or her thesis supervisor. Topics must be approved by a committee of the department. The thesis shall be read and graded by the student’s thesis director and by at least two other scholars, one of whom may be an outside examiner. For purposes of registration, this work will be designated as PSYC 690: Research and Thesis (30 credits).

  4. Thesis Examination. The student must defend the thesis and demonstrate knowledge of the field in which the thesis falls in an oral examination before a committee of the department.

Top

Diploma in Clinical Psychology

The Diploma in Clinical Psychology provides students enroled in the MA in Psychology (Research and Clinical Training Option) with clinical coursework and practica qualifying them for further clinical training provided in the PhD in Psychology (Research and Clinical Training Option).

Admission Requirements

The Diploma in Clinical Psychology is open only to students enrolled in the MA or PhD in Psychology (Research and Clinical Training Option).

Requirements for the Diploma in Clinical Psychology consist of 10 courses.

  1. Credits. (30 credits) Students are required to complete 30 credits as follows:

  2. Courses. PSYC 701, 702, 703, 704, 705, 706, 707, 720 (24 credits); PSYC 708, 709, or 710 (3 credits); and PSYC 711, 712, or 713 (3 credits).

Courses

The following are 3-credit courses unless otherwise indicated.

PSYC 601 Statistical Analysis and Experimental Design
A detailed consideration of selected issues in Psychological statistics. Topics include parametric and non-parametric techniques, analysis of variance, power of statistical tests, and hypothesis testing.

PSYC 644 Clinical and Health Research Area Seminar I (non-credit)
A seminar in which current research of faculty and students in clinical and health psychology is presented and discussed.

PSYC 645 Cognitive Science Area Seminar I (non-credit)
A seminar in which current research of faculty and students in cognitive science is presented and discussed.

PSYC 646 Human Development Area Seminar I (non-credit)
A seminar in which current research of faculty and students in human development and developmental processes is presented and discussed.

PSYC 647 Behavioural Neuroscience Area Seminar I (non-credit)
A seminar in which current research of faculty and students in behavioural neuroscience is presented and discussed.

PSYC 690 Research and Thesis (30 credits)

PSYC 700 Psychopathology
Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in behaviour disorders or equivalent.
This seminar deals with historical and current approaches to the study of behaviour disorders and problems of life adjustment in both adults and children, including critical evaluation of empirical findings in selected areas. Classification systems, including the current revision of the APA Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, are critically reviewed. Students with credit for PSYC 660 or 860 may not take this course for credit.

PSYC 701 Models of Assessment I
Prerequisite: PSYC 700; Co-requisite: PSYC 706 or permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
Focusing on cognitive and ability testing of children and adults, this course stresses the conceptual bases of ability testing, research results and their implications for test interpretation, and strengths and limitations of current test batteries for children and adults. Specific course content includes: a) measurement theory, including issues of test construction, reliability, validity, and evaluation; b) appropriate use and interpretation of specific cognitive assessment batteries (e.g. the Wechsler and Stanford-Binet scales for children and adults); and c) special assessment issues, including the testing of minorities and assessment-related ethical problems. A practicum in assessment techniques (PSYC 706) is typically taken in conjunction with this course.

PSYC 702 Models of Assessment II
Prerequisite: PSYC 701; Co-requisite: PSYC 707 or permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
This course is a continuation of Assessment I, and focuses on the measurement of behaviour related directly to personality and/or behaviour disorders in both adult and child populations. Interviewing, projective techniques and structural (quantitative) tests of personality such as the MMPI and CPI are included. The course stresses the evaluation of assessment procedures in terms of reliability and validity issues, and focuses on the selection and use of assessment procedures for specific types of prediction. The course also stresses the integration of assessment procedures into treatment planning and evaluation.

PSYC 703 Psychological Treatment I: Foundations and Systems
Prerequisite: PSYC 700.
Models of psychological intervention with both adults and children are examined with respect to: a) theoretical formulations and etiological assumptions; b) treatment objectives and strategies; c) issues related to the application of these models; d) the efficacy of treatment procedures, including general issues in outcome research. The major emphases are on behavioural and psychodynamic approaches. Among other topics, the ethics of therapeutic interventions are discussed.

PSYC 704 Psychological Treatment II: Empirically Supported Interventions
Prerequisite: PSYC 703.
A continuation of PSYC 703. Psychological Treatment I: Foundations and Systems.

PSYC 705 APC Practicum I
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 700 and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
Students participate in case supervision, observe and/or assist with clients in therapy, and attend case conferences at the Applied Psychology Centre (APC).

PSYC 706 Assessment Practicum I
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 701, 705 and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
This course focuses on the practical applications of the material discussed in Models of Assessment I (PSYC 701). Students administer intellectual tests under supervision. Techniques for administration, interpretation and report-writing of specific test batteries suitable for adults and children are stressed.

PSYC 707 Assessment Practicum II
Prerequisite: PSYC 706, Co-requisite: PSYC 702, and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
This course focuses on the practical applications of the material discussed in models of Assessment II (PSYC 702). Students administer personality tests under supervision. Techniques for administration, interpretation and report writing of specific assessment test batteries suitable for adults and children are stressed.

PSYC 708 APC Practicum II: General
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 703, 704, 706, 707 and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
The focus of this course is the practical applications of the material discussed in Models of Assessment II and Models of Behaviour Change I and II PSYC 702, 703 and 704. Students are responsible for the assessment and treatment of selected clients of the Applied Psychology Centre under faculty supervision.

PSYC 709 APC Practicum II: Adult
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 703, 704, 706, 707 and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
The focus of this course is the practical applications of the material discussed in Models of Assessment II and Models of Behaviour Change I and II PSYC 702, 703 and 704. Students are responsible for the assessment and treatment of selected adult clients of the Applied Psychology Centre under faculty supervision.

PSYC 710 APC Practicum II: Child
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 703, 704, 706, 707 and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
The focus of this course is the practical applications of the material discussed in Models of Assessment II and Models of Behaviour Change I and II PSYC 702, 703 and 704. Students are responsible for the assessment and treatment of selected child clients of the Applied Psychology Centre under faculty supervision.

PSYC 711 Extramural Practicum I: General
Prerequisite: PSYC 701, 702, 703, 704, 706, 707 and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
A four-month extramural practicum done under qualified supervisors in an applied setting approved by the department’s internship committee, e.g., hospitals, clinics, schools, community and rehabilitation centres.

PSYC 712 Extramural Practicum I: Adult
Prerequisite: PSYC 701, 702, 703, 704, 706, 707 and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
A four-month extramural practicum with adult clients, done under qualified supervisors in an applied setting approved by the department’s internship committee, e.g. hospitals, clinics, schools, community and rehabilitation centres.

PSYC 713 Extramural Practicum I: Child
Prerequisite: PSYC 701, 702, 703, 704, 706, 707 and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
A four-month extramural practicum with child clients, done under qualified supervisors in an applied setting approved by the department’s internship committee, e.g., hospitals, clinics, schools, community and rehabilitation centres.

PSYC 714 Central Topics in Psychology (6 credits)
This general seminar deals with basic theoretical and research issues in Psychology. Topics are drawn from a wide range of areas in Psychology including perceptual and cognitive processes, learning, motivation, and psycho-pathology. Issues are considered with respect to developmental, physiological and social approaches. Students who have received credit for PSYC 602 may not take this course for credit.

PSYC 715 Vision and Audition
A seminar on physical, physiological and psychological aspects of visual and auditory perception with special emphasis on the comparison between normal and defective vision and hearing.

PSYC 716 Advanced Human Development
This seminar on theory and research focuses on human development and developmental processes. Subject matter will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this course, provided that the course content has changed. Change in content will be indicated by the letter following the course number.

PSYC 720 Seminar on Ethical and Professional Issues
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 834 or permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
In this biweekly seminar, ethical and professional issues in clinical psychology are considered through case presentations by students, faculty and guest clinicians. The ethical principles of national accrediting bodies and of the Order of Psychologists of Québec are reviewed.

PSYC 721 Special Topics Seminar
This seminar provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an integrative or selected area of psychology outside the department’s major areas of specialization. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval of the program director.
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course up to 5 times provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PSYC 721A, PSYC 721B. Students with credit for PSYC 603 or 803 may take this course for credit only if the subject matter is different.

PSYC 724 Special Topics in Clinical and Health Psychology
This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of clinical and/or health psychology. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval of the program director.
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course up to 5 times provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PSYC 724A, PSYC 724B. Students with credit for PSYC 603, 721, 803, or 805 may take this course for credit only if the subject matter is different.

PSYC 725 Special Topics in Cognitive Science
This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of cognitive science. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval of the program director.
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course up to 5 times provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PSYC 725A, PSYC 725B. Students with credit for PSYC 603, 721, 803, or 805 may take this course for credit only if the subject matter is different.

PSYC 726 Special Topics in Human Development
This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of human development and developmental processes. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval of the program director.
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course up to 5 times provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PSYC 726A, PSYC 726B. Students with credit for PSYC 603, 721, 803, or 805 may take this course for credit only if the subject matter is different.

PSYC 727 Special Topics in Behavioural Neuroscience
This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of behavioural neuroscience. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval of the program director.
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course up to 5 times provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PSYC 727A, PSYC 727B. Students with credit for PSYC 603, 721, 803, or 805 may take this course for credit only if the subject matter is different.

PSYC 734 Multivariate Statistics
Prerequisite: PSYC 601.
Building upon material presented in PSYC 601, this course covers multivariate procedures, includes MANOVA, cluster analysis, canonical correlation, factor analysis, structural equation modelling, and multilevel modelling.
Note: Students who have received credit for PSYC 730 or PSYC 732 may not take this course for credit.

PSYC 801 Research Seminar I
A seminar attended by all doctoral students in which specific research proposals and related theoretical issues and methodological problems are presented for discussion by students and participating faculty.

PSYC 802 Research Seminar II
A continuation of PSYC 801.

PSYC 823 APC Practicum III: General
Prerequisite: PSYC 708 (or 709 or 710), 711 (or 712 or 713). Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 834, 835 (or 836 or 837), and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
Advanced students are expected to begin to define clinical interests and treatment methods consonant with their career goals. They receive the appropriate clinical experience and supervision in this practicum (e.g., working with children, adolescents, adults, working with clients who present particular types of problems).

PSYC 824 APC Practicum III: Adult
Prerequisite: PSYC 708 (or 709 or 710), 711 (or 712 or 713). Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 834, 835 (or 836 or 837), and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
Advanced students are expected to begin to define clinical interests and treatment methods consonant with their career goals. They receive the appropriate clinical experience and supervision in this practicum working with adult clients, e.g. working with a particular orientation and/or with particular types of problems.

PSYC 825 APC Practicum III: Child
Prerequisite: PSYC 708 (or 709 or 710), 711 (or 712 or 713). Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 834, 835 (or 836 or 837), and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
Advanced students are expected to begin to define clinical interests and treatment methods consonant with their career goals. They receive the appropriate clinical experience and supervision in this practicum working with child clients and families, e.g. working with a particular orientation and/or with particular types of problems.

PSYC 826 APC Practicum IV: General
Prerequisite: PSYC 823 (or 824 or 825) and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
This course is a specialized practicum for advanced students involving clinical experience under supervision.

PSYC 827 APC Practicum IV: Adult
Prerequisite: PSYC 823 (or 824 or 825) and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
This course is a specialized practicum for advanced students involving clinical experience with adult clients under supervision.

PSYC 828 APC Practicum IV: Child
Prerequisite: PSYC 823 (or 824 or 825) and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
This course is a specialized practicum for advanced students involving clinical experience with child clients under supervision.

PSYC 834 Advanced Clinical Seminar I
Prerequisite: PSYC 711 (or 712 or 713), 708 (or 709 or 710), and permission of Director of Clinical Training.
This seminar provides an advanced treatment of issues in current psychological theory and research that are relevant to clinical practice, e.g., causal models and their assumptions, legal and ethical issues, classification by state, trait, and situational context; brain-behaviour relations. The aims are to foster in students a) regular review of clinically relevant literature; b) a critical perspective regarding current clinical practices; and c) guidelines and criteria for optimal assessment and treatment decisions tailored to the needs of clients.

PSYC 835 Advanced Clinical Seminar II: Adult
Prerequisite: PSYC 834.
The seminar provides an advanced analysis of issues in the assessment and treatment of behaviour disorders in adulthood. Prototype cases are presented for illustrative discussion of particular clinical issues, e.g. indicators of risk for suicide, homicide, and psychosis; imagery and dreams in psychological treatment; stress-related physical disorders; anxiety-spectrum disorders; treatment for couples, families, and groups. Assessment and treatment approaches to particular disorders are compared with reference to etiological assumptions and levels of inference.

PSYC 836 Advanced Clinical Seminar II: Child
Prerequisite: PSYC 834.
The seminar provides an advanced analysis of issues in the assessment and treatment of behaviour disorders in children in a developmental context. Prototype cases are presented for illustrative discussion of particular clinical issues, e.g. stress-related physical disorders; family therapy; child abuse; age-related symptom expression and variability; non-verbal therapies.

PSYC 837 Advanced Clinical Seminar II: General
Prerequisite: PSYC 834.
This seminar is a blend of issues examined in PSYC 835 and 836 (see above).

PSYC 838 Extramural Practicum II: General
Prerequisite: Psych 708 (or 709 or 710), 711 (or 712 or 713), and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
This course is a senior extramural practicum, done under qualified supervision in an applied setting approved by the department’s practicum committee, e.g. hospitals, clinics, schools, community and rehabilitation centres.

PSYC 839 Extramural Practicum II: Adult
Prerequisite: Psych 708 (or 709 or 710), 711 (or 712 or 713), and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
This course is a senior extramural practicum with adult clients, done under qualified supervision in an applied setting approved by the department’s practicum committee, e.g. hospitals, clinics, schools, community and rehabilitation centres.

PSYC 840 Extramural Practicum II: Child
Prerequisite: Psych 708 (or 709 or 710), 711 (or 712 or 713), and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
This course is a senior extramural practicum with child clients done under qualified supervision in an applied setting approved by the department’s practicum committee, e.g. hospitals, clinics, schools, community and rehabilitation centres.

PSYC 841 Extramural Practicum III: General
This course is a senior extramural practicum, done under qualified supervision in an applied setting approved by the department’s practicum committee, e.g. hospitals, clinics, schools, community and rehabilitation centres.

PSYC 842 Extramural Practicum III: Adult
This course is a senior extramural practicum with adult clients, done under qualified supervision in an applied setting approved by the department’s practicum committee, e.g. hospitals, clinics, schools, community and rehabilitation centres.

PSYC 843 Extramural Practicum III: Child
This course is a senior extramural practicum with child clients, done under qualified supervision in an applied setting approved by the department’s practicum committee, e.g. hospitals, clinics, schools, community and rehabilitation centres.

PSYC 844 Clinical and Health Research Area Seminar II
This seminar provides the opportunity for faculty and students working in clinical and health psychology to present and discuss their current research.
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course up to 4 times provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PSYC 844A, PSYC 844B.

PSYC 845 Cognitive Science Area Seminar II
This seminar provides the opportunity for faculty and students working in cognitive science to present and discuss their current research.
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course up to 4 times provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PSYC 845A, PSYC 845B.

PSYC 846 Human Development Area Seminar II
This seminar provides the opportunity for faculty and students working on human development and developmental processes to present and discuss their current research.
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course up to 4 times provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PSYC 846A, PSYC 846B.

PSYC 847 Behavioural Neuroscience Area Seminar II
This seminar provides the opportunity for faculty and students working in behavioural neuroscience to present and discuss their current research.
Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course up to 4 times provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content are indicated by the letter following the course number, e.g. PSYC 847A, PSYC 847B.

PSYC 850 Practicum in Experimental Techniques (3 or 6 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of the PhD Program Director.
This practicum is designed to give students the opportunity to develop their research skills by such activities as: (a) learning new experimental skills and techniques; (b) developing computer programs for the execution of experiments or the recording or analysis of experimental data; (c) developing new instruments to facilitate research on a problem, and other equivalent activities. Prior to beginning the work, students who elect to take this option submit to their thesis supervisor and to the program director a 3-5 page outline of what they want to do to meet the practicum requirements. Once the practicum is approved, students are responsible for carrying out the activities described in the outline. Students may complete one 6-credit practicum, or may complete up to two 3-credit practica. Changes in the content of the practica are indicated by a letter following the course number. The number of credits is based on the rule that 45 hours of work equals one credit.

PSYC 851 Teaching of Laboratory Techniques
Prerequisite: Permission of PhD Program Director.
This practicum is designed to train students in the teaching of laboratory techniques. Under supervision, the student is responsible for training an apprentice in specialized experimental skills that require extended on-the-job supervision. Suitable topics would include high pressure liquid chromatography, electrophysiological recording, in vivo voltammetry, or computer programming related to a specific experimental application. The number of credits is based on the rule that 45 hours of work equals one credit.

PSYC 880 PhD Comprehensive Examination (non-credit)

PSYC 885 Predoctoral Internship
Prerequisite: PSYC 835 (or 836 or 837), 823 (824 or 825), and permission of the Director of Clinical Training.
The pre-doctoral internship consists of the equivalent of 12 months full-time employment under qualified supervision in an applied setting approved by the department’s internship committee. The internship is usually done after completion of course requirements, and after data collection and analysis, and a draft of the doctoral thesis have been completed.

PSYC 890 Research and Thesis (60 credits)

Top

Back to top

© Concordia University