Concordia University

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Psychology MA

Specific Information about all Programs

Admission Requirements

Admission to the PhD degree requires a master's degree in psychology or its equivalent in a closely related discipline. Admission to the PhD degree (Research and Clinical Training Option) requires that applicants have completed specific Psychology undergraduate courses required by federal and provincial licensing bodies, including an empirically based undergraduate thesis or its equivalent, as well as master's-level courses in Psychology specified by the program.

Admission to the MA (Research Option) requires an undergraduate degree in psychology or a closely related discipline. Applications from students with non-psychology degrees are evaluated to assess whether they are sufficiently prepared for graduate studies in Psychology. Admission to the MA (Research and Clinical Training Option) requires an honours undergraduate degree in psychology or its equivalent. In addition, applicants must also have completed specific undergraduate courses required by federal and provincial licensing bodies, including an empirically based undergraduate thesis or its equivalent. Students who are lacking up to three of these courses may obtain the equivalency for the missing credits by taking appropriate undergraduate and/or graduate courses during their degree.

Enrolment in these programs is limited in part by the availability of research supervisors and, for the Research and Clinical Training Option, by space in that option.

Applicants are selected on the basis of past academic record, letters of recommendation, the results of the Graduate Record Examination (optional, but highly recommended), and the relevance of their proposed research to the research expertise of the faculty. Students successfully completing their master's program in psychology at Concordia University need submit only an application form and letters of recommendation when applying for the doctoral degree. Psychology graduate courses are not open to graduate-level independent students, except in specific circumstances as defined by the department.

Upon recommendation of their thesis supervisor, students enrolled in the Master of Arts (Psychology) program at Concordia University who have completed a minimum of 12 credits of graduate level course work and who have shown high academic performance and potential through performance in research may apply for accelerated admission to doctoral studies without submitting a master's thesis. Approval for accelerated admission must be obtained from the student's thesis committee and the graduate admissions subcommittee by August 15 to allow entry into the PhD program in the Fall term. Students in the Research Option who obtain accelerated admission are not required to take the elective course (chosen from PSYC 700, PSYC 716, PSYC 721, PSYC 724, PSYC 725, PSYC 726, PSYC 727or PSYC 734) as part of their MA coursework. Students in the Research and Clinical Training option may not obtain accelerated admission to the PhD program from MA Year I, but may apply for accelerated admission, upon recommendation of their thesis supervisor, from MA Year II.

Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements and exemptions.

Language Requirements. Although no formal language courses or examinations are required, students intending to work in Quebec are strongly encouraged to develop a working knowledge of French. Students who plan to seek admission to the Order of Quebec Psychologists (OPQ) are advised that Article 46 of the professional code of the Province of Quebec states that a working knowledge of French is required for professional certification.

Undergraduate Teaching. Students are encouraged to take opportunities to assist in undergraduate teaching. The department treats such teaching as part of the student's learning experience. Discussion of aims and techniques as well as advice and criticism are parts of the training that students obtain as teaching assistants.

Colloquia. All students are expected to attend departmental colloquia.

Requirements for the Degree

Research Option

  1. Residence. The minimum period of residence is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study.

  2. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits consisting of course work and thesis as follows: PSYC 601 (3 credits); PSYC 644, 645, 646, or 647 (3 credits); PSYC 714 (6 credits); 3 credits selected in consultation with the thesis supervisor from among PSYC 700, 716, 721, 722, 724, 725, 726, 727 or 734; and PSYC 690 (30 credits).

  3. Thesis. The student must submit a thesis on a topic relating to one or more of the areas of research specialization of the department (Behavioural Neuroscience, Clinical and Health Research, Human Development and Developmental Processes, and Cognitive Science) chosen in consultation with his or her thesis supervisor. Topics must be approved by a committee of the department. The thesis shall be read and graded by the student's thesis director and by at least two other scholars, one of whom may be an outside examiner. For purposes of registration, this work is designated as PSYC 690 - Research and Thesis (30 credits).

  4. Thesis Examination. The student must defend the thesis and demonstrate knowledge of the field in which the thesis falls in an oral examination before a committee of the department.

Research and Clinical Training Option

  1. Residence. The minimum period of residence is one year (3 terms) of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study.

  2. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 45 credits consisting of course work and thesis as follows: PSYC 601 (3 credits); PSYC 644, 645, 646, or 647 (0 credits); PSYC 700 (3 credits); PSYC 714 (6 credits); PSYC 734 (3 credits); and PSYC 690 (30 credits). Students in this option will concurrently complete the courses indicated under Diploma in Clinical Psychology.

  3. Thesis. The student must submit a thesis on a topic relating to one or more of the areas of research specialization of the department (Behavioural Neuroscience, Clinical and Health Research, Human Development and Developmental Processes, and Cognitive Science) chosen in consultation with his or her thesis supervisor. Topics must be approved by a committee of the department. The thesis shall be read and graded by the student's thesis director and by at least two other scholars, one of whom may be an outside examiner. For purposes of registration, this work is designated as PSYC 690 - Research and Thesis (30 credits).

  4. Thesis Examination. The student must defend the thesis and demonstrate knowledge of the field in which the thesis falls in an oral examination before a committee of the department.

Academic Regulations

  1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a detailed review of the Academic Regulations.

  2. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time Limit requirements. In the case of the Diploma in Clinical Psychology, the time limit is 9 terms (3 years) for full-time students; for part-time students the time limit is 15 terms (5 years).

  3. Graduation Requirement. In order to graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.70.
     

Courses

The following are 3-credit courses unless otherwise indicated.

PSYC 601 Statistical Analysis and Experimental Design
A detailed consideration of selected issues in Psychological statistics. Topics include parametric and non-parametric techniques, analysis of variance, power of statistical tests, and hypothesis testing.

PSYC 644 Clinical and Health Research Area Seminar I (non-credit)
A seminar in which current research of faculty and students in clinical and health psychology is presented and discussed.

PSYC 645 Cognitive Science Area Seminar I (non-credit)
A seminar in which current research of faculty and students in cognitive science is presented and discussed.

PSYC 646 Human Development Area Seminar I (non-credit)
A seminar in which current research of faculty and students in human development and developmental processes is presented and discussed.

PSYC 647 Behavioural Neuroscience Area Seminar I (non-credit)
A seminar in which current research of faculty and students in behavioural neuroscience is presented and discussed.

PSYC 690 Research and Thesis (30 credits)

PSYC 700 Psychopathology
Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in behaviour disorders or equivalent.
This seminar deals with historical and current approaches to the study of behaviour disorders and problems of life adjustment in both adults and children, including critical evaluation of empirical findings in selected areas. Classification systems, including the current revision of the APA Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, are critically reviewed. Students with credit for PSYC 660 or 860 may not take this course for credit.

PSYC 714 Central Topics in Psychology (6 credits)
This general seminar deals with basic theoretical and research issues in Psychology. Topics are drawn from a wide range of areas in Psychology including perceptual and cognitive processes, learning, motivation, and psycho-pathology. Issues are considered with respect to developmental, physiological and social approaches. Students who have received credit for PSYC 602 may not take this course for credit.

PSYC 716 Advanced Human Development
This seminar on theory and research focuses on human development and developmental processes. Subject matter will vary from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this course, provided that the course content has changed. Change in content will be indicated by the letter following the course number.

PSYC 721 Special Topics Seminar
This seminar provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an integrative or selected area of psychology outside the department’s major areas of specialization. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course multiple times provided that the course content has changed.

PSYC 722 Focused Topic Seminar (1.5 credits)
This seminar provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in a selected area of psychology. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course multiple times provided that the course content has changed.

PSYC 724 Special Topics in Clinical and Health Psychology
This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of clinical and/or health psychology. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course multiple times provided that the course content has changed.

PSYC 725 Special Topics in Cognitive Science
This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of cognitive science. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course multiple times provided that the course content has changed.

PSYC 726 Special Topics in Human Development
This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of human development and developmental processes. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course multiple times provided that the course content has changed.

PSYC 727 Special Topics in Behavioural Neuroscience
This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized research literature in an area of behavioural neuroscience. It may be offered as a seminar, tutorial or directed reading course, or in any other format, subject to approval of the program director. Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may register for this course multiple times provided that the course content has changed.

PSYC 734 Multivariate Statistics
Prerequisite: PSYC 601.
Building upon material presented in PSYC 601, this course covers latent variable analyses and multivariate procedures, including factor analysis, structural equation modelling, multiple group models, and multilevel modelling.

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