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Education PhD

Admission Requirements

The normal requirement for admission is a Master of Arts degree in Education, Applied Linguistics, Child Studies, Educational Studies, or Educational Technology, with high standing, from an accredited university. Applicants with a Master's degree in a related field or discipline, such as psychology, sociology, anthropology, adult education, and human resource development, are considered. Applicants from other disciplines might be offered conditional admission which may include fulfilling prerequisite courses.

Proficiency in English. Applicants whose primary language is not English must demonstrate that their knowledge of English is sufficient to pursue graduate studies in their chosen field. Please refer to the Graduate Admission page for further information on the Language Proficiency requirements and exemptions.

Requirements for the Degree

  1. Credits. A fully-qualified candidate is required to complete a minimum of 90 credits.

  2. Orientation. Each candidate is assigned an interim research supervisor and a supervisory committee. This interim supervisory committee consists of three members of the faculty, including a research supervisor. This supervisory committee advises the student on courses to take, including prerequisite courses where necessary (to be determined no later than the first two weeks of the student's first term), and arranges for the comprehensive examination. At this time the membership of the student's interim committee is replaced by a dissertation committee of the student's choice.

  3. Courses. Each candidate is required to complete the following:
    1. EDUC 806 - Quantitative Methods (3 credits)
    2. EDUC 807 - Qualitative Methods (3 credits)
    3. EDUC 808 - Reporting Research (3 credits)
    4. EDUC 809 - Advanced Issues in Education (3 credits)
    5. 9 credits of elective courses
    6. EDUC 890 - Comprehensive Examination (12 credits)
      Each candidate must successfully complete EDUC 890 before being admitted to candidacy for the degree. The comprehensive consists of a written and oral examination that tests the candidate on both general and area specific research. After successfully completing the comprehensive examination, the student is admitted to candidacy for the degree.
    7. EDUC 891 - Doctoral Proposal (9 credits)
      Note: the proposal is accepted only after the student is admitted to candidacy.
    8. EDUC 895 - Doctoral Dissertation (48 credits).
      A doctoral thesis is expected to make an original contribution to knowledge, and be presented in acceptable literary form.
       

Academic Regulations

  1. Academic Standing. Please refer to the Academic Standing section of the Calendar for a detailed review of the Academic Regulations.

  2. Residence. The minimum period of residence is two years (6 terms) of full-time study beyond the master’s degree, or the equivalent in part-time study. A minimum of one year of full-time study is highly recommended.

  3. Time Limit. Please refer to the Academic Regulation page for further details regarding the Time Limit requirements.

  4. Graduation Requirement. To graduate, students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00.

Courses

Required Courses

Each course is worth 3 credits unless otherwise indicated.

EDUC 806 Quantitative Methods
Prerequisite: ETEC 641, or CHST 605 or permission of instructor.
This course builds students' capacity to conduct quantitative research in education at the doctoral level. It covers all topics related to experimental and quasi-experimental design and the application of univariate statistics to educational research problems. In doing so, the course addresses the basic theory underlying quantitative approaches, selection of an initial research question, the types of questions best suited to quantitative methods, managing and analyzing quantitative data, external and internal validity, reliability and objectivity. This course also provides opportunities to analyze quantitative data.
Note: Students who have received credit for EDUC 802 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 807 Qualitative Methods
This course builds students’ capacity to conduct qualitative research in education at the doctoral level. It covers various types of qualitative research, such as ethnography, case studies, content analysis, and naturalistic observation. In doing so, the course addresses the basic theory and philosophy underlying qualitative approaches, selection of an initial research question, the types of questions best suited to qualitative methods, managing qualitative data, qualitative data analysis, and assuring the credibility and trustworthiness of qualitative data.
Note: Students who have received credit for EDUC 802 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 808 Reporting Research
This course prepares students to report their research to various stakeholders of educational research, including funding agencies, other researchers, journal editors, policy makers, and the public. Students prepare various research-related documents, and provide peer reviews.
Note: Students who have received credit for EDUC 800 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 809 Advanced Issues in Education
This seminar explores one or more complex issues of education that has implications for Applied Linguistics, Child Studies, Educational Studies, and Educational Technology. During the course, students explore the research and popular literature on the topic, critically examine the epistemological, sociological, and theoretical bases of the literature, and relate the lessons learned to their own proposed research projects.
Note: Students who have received credit for EDUC 801 or EDUC 805 may not take this course for credit.

EDUC 890 Comprehensive Examination (12 credits)
EDUC 891 Doctoral Proposal (9 credits)
EDUC 895 Doctoral Dissertation (48 credits)

Area Tutorials

The content and format of an area tutorial may vary from year to year, depending on the number of students and the availability of faculty members. All area tutorials involve directed reading, research, seminar presentations, and discussion sessions on selected topics within that problem area.

Area tutorials offered by the Department of Education fall into the following categories:

EDUC 810-824 Educational Technology Area Tutorials
EDUC 825-839 Child Studies Area Tutorials
EDUC 840-854 Educational Studies Area Tutorials
EDUC 855-869 Applied Linguistics Area Tutorials

Each course is worth 3 credits unless otherwise indicated.

EDUC 810-824 Educational Technology Area Tutorials
Area tutorials in Educational Technology are selected from topics related to the application of technology to education and training. These include Human Performance Technology (HPT); theory, development and research in educational media; distance education; educational cybernetics, systems analysis and design; and human resources development.

EDUC 825-839 Child Studies Area Tutorials
Area tutorials in Child Studies are selected from topics that focus on children’s typical and atypical learning and development (e.g., social or cognitive development), in a variety of settings and contexts (e.g., early childhood environments, schools, after-school programs, recreation and community settings, families and peers, special education environments).

EDUC 840-854 Educational Studies Area Tutorials
Area tutorials in Educational Studies consist of philosophical, historical, social psychological, sociological and anthropological aspects of education locally, nationally, and internationally. These may include, but are not limited to, comparative study or early childhood education thought and practice, multicultural education, policy and practice in diverse school settings, curriculum issues and indigenous knowledge, mediated learning environments, curriculum theory, moral education, issues of difference in sexual orientation, class, race, and gender.

EDUC 855-869 Applied Linguistics Area Tutorials
Area tutorials in Applied Linguistics consist of a variety of topics related to second-language learning and teaching. More specifically they may focus on interlanguage development; teaching of pronunciation; role of routinization in language acquisition; acquisition of second language vocabulary; teaching and learning of second language phonology.

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